JENUARY 1-31

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

2015-11

ALL SAINTS OF EASTERN ORTHODOX CHURCH

JENUARY

Sources:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/hp.php

ORTHODOX ENGLAND

http://www.abbamoses.com

GOD IS WONDERFUL IN HIS SAINTS

January 1

The Circumcision of Our Lord Jesus Christ – Jan 1
In keeping with the Law of Moses, the Savior’s parents had Him circumcised eight days after His birth (see Luke ch. 2). On this day, following Jewish custom, he received the name Jesus (Yeshua, a form of Joshua), meaning “God saves.” Thus, on this day, the Covenant of Moses was fulfilled and brought to an end, and the Salvation of God’s people was proclaimed to the world.

Almachius (Telemachus) Jan 1  
+ 391. A hermit who came to Rome from the East and publicly protested against the gladiatorial combats in the Roman amphitheatre. He was seized and cut to pieces by order of the prefect Alipius. As a consequence, the Emperor Honorius is said to have abolished such spectacles.

Basil Jan 1 
c 475. A priest from Arles who became second Bishop of Aix en Provence in France.

Clarus Jan 1 
+ c 660. A monk at the monastery of St Ferreol, he was chosen abbot of the monastery of St Marcellus in Vienne in France.

Our Father among the Saints Basil the Great (379) – Jan 1
In its services, the Church calls St Basil a “bee of the Church of Christ”: bringing the honey of divinely-inspired wisdom to the faithful, stinging the uprisings of heresy. He was born in Cappadocia to a wealthy and prominent family. Their worldly wealth, however, is as nothing compared to the wealth of Saints that they have given to the Church: his parents St Basil the Elder and St Emmelia; his sister St Macrina (July 19), the spiritual head of the family; and his brothers St Gregory of Nyssa (January 10), and St Peter, future bishop of Sebaste (January 9).
Inspired and tutored by his father, a renowned professor of rhetoric, the brilliant Basil set out to master the secular learning and arts of his day, traveling to Athens, where he studied alongside his life-long friend St Gregory of Nazianzus. When he returned from his studies in 356, he found that his mother and his sister Macrina had turned the family home into a convent, and that his brothers had also taken up the monastic life nearby. Puffed up by his secular accomplishments, he at first resisted his sister’s pleas to take up a life devoted to God, but at last, through her prayers and admonition, entered upon the ascetical life.
After traveling among the monks of Egypt, Palestine and Syria, he settled in Cappadocia as a hermit, living in utter poverty and writing his ascetical homilies. A monastic community steadily gathered around him, and for its good order St Basil wrote his Rule, which is regarded as the charter of monasticism. (St Benedict in the West was familiar with this Rule, and his own is modeled on it.)
In about 370 he was consecrated Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia. Even as bishop, he continued to live without any possessions save a worn garment to cover himself. At this time the Arian heresy was rending the Church, and it became St Basil’s lot to defend Orthodoxy in Sermons and writings, a task which he fulfilled with such erudition and wisdom that he is called “Basil the Great.” He reposed in peace in 379, at the age of forty-nine.
St Gregory, Bishop of Nazianzus (374), father of St Gregory the Theologian
He converted to Christianity from paganism as an adult through the influence of his pious wife St Nonna (Aug. 5). He was made Bishop of Nazianzus in Cappadocia in 329, and served faithfully for forty-five years, defending his flock against the inroads of Arianism and the persecutions of Julian the Apostate. Late in life, he ordained his son Gregory, later known as St Gregory the Theologian (Jan. 25) to assist him. He reposed in peace, aged almost 100.
St Emilia (375), mother of Sts Macrina, Basil the Great and Gregory of Nyssa, Peter of Sebaste, and Theosevia
Her main commemoration is on May 8.

Concordius Jan 1 
+ 175. A subdeacon martyred in Spoleto in central Italy under Marcus Aurelius.

Connat (Comnatan) Jan 1 
+ c 590. Abbess of Kildare in Ireland.

Cuan (Mochua, Moncan) Jan 1 
6th cent. The founder of many churches and monasteries in Ireland, he lived to nearly 100.

Elvan and Mydwyn Jan 1 
2nd cent. By tradition they were two Britons sent to ask for missionaries for Britain.

Eugendus (Oyend) Jan 1 
450-c 510. Fourth Abbot of Condat in France, called Saint-Oyend after him and later Saint-Claude. He became a monk at the age of seven and lived there until his repose.

Fanchea (Garbh) Jan 1 
+ c ?585. Born in Clogher in Ireland, she was the sister of St Enda. She founded a convent at Rossory in Fermanagh and was buried in Killane.

Felix of Bourges Jan 1 
+ c 580. Bishop of Bourges in France. He took part in the Council of Paris in 573.

Fulgentius Jan 1 
+ 532. Born in North Africa, he became a monk early in life and was elected abbot. He had to flee from the Vandal persecution. In 502 or 507 he was chosen Bishop of Ruspe but was again exiled by the Vandals. He spent his exile in Sardinia where he wrote numerous works which still exist. He returned to Africa in 523.

Justin of Chieti Jan 1 
+ c ? 540. Venerated from time immemorial in Chienti in Italy, he was bishop of that city.

Maelrhys Jan 1 
6th cent. A saint of the Isle of Bardsey in Wales, probably born in Brittany.

Rome (Martyrs of) Jan 1 
+ c 304. Thirty soldiers martyred in Rome under Diocletian.

William of Dijon Jan 1 
962-1031. William was born near Novara in Italy and became a monk near Vercelli, from where he went to France. Here he was sent to restore the monastery of St Benignus in Dijon, Gentle with the poor, he showed great firmness in his dealings with the great. Towards the end of his life he founded the monastery of Fruttuaria in Piedmont and rebuilt that of Fécamp.

January 2

Beginning of the Forefeast of Theophany – Jan 2

Adalard Jan 2 
c 751-827. He entered the monastery of Corbie in the north of France, where he became abbot. Exiled, he founded New Corbie (Corvey) in Saxony in Germany.

Artaxus, Acutus, Eugenda, Maximianus, Timothy, Tobias and Vitus Jan 2 
3-4th cent. Martyrs in Syrmium in Pannonia.

Seraphim of Sarov (1833) – Jan 2
“Saint Seraphim was born in the town of Kursk in 1759. From tender childhood he was under the protection of the most holy Mother of God, who, when he was nine years old, appeared to him in a vision, and through her icon of Kursk, healed him from a grave sickness from which he had not been expected to recover. At the age of nineteen he entered the monastery of Sarov, where he amazed all with his obedience, his lofty asceticism, and his great humility. In 1780 the Saint was stricken with a sickness which he manfully endured for three years, until our Lady the Theotokos healed him, appearing to him with the Apostles Peter and John. He was tonsured a monk in 1786, being named for the holy Hieromartyr Seraphim, Bishop of Phanarion (Dec. 4), and was ordained deacon a year later. In his unquenchable love for God, he continually added labours to labours, increasing in virtue and prayer with titan strides. Once, during the Divine Liturgy of Holy and Great Thursday he was counted worthy of a vision of our Lord Jesus Christ, Who appeared encompassed by the heavenly hosts. After this dread vision, he gave himself over to greater labours.
“In 1794, Saint Seraphim took up the solitary life in a cell in the forest. This period of extreme asceticism lasted some fifteen years, until 1810. It was at this time that he took upon himself one of the greatest feats of his life. Assailed with despondency and a storm of contrary thoughts raised by the enemy of our salvation, the Saint passed a thousand nights on a rock, continuing in prayer until God gave him complete victory over the enemy. On another occasion, he was assaulted by robbers, who broke his chest and his head with their blows, leaving him almost dead. Here again, he began to recover after an appearance of the most Holy Theotokos, who came to him with the Apostles Peter and John, and pointing to Saint Seraphim, uttered these awesome words, ‘This is one of my kind.’
“In 1810, at the age of fifty, weakened by his more than human struggles, Saint Seraphim returned to the monastery for the third part of his ascetical labours, in which he lived as a recluse, until 1825. For the first five years of his reclusion, he spoke to no one at all, and little is known of this period. After five years, he began receiving visitors little by little, giving counsel and consolation to ailing souls. In 1825, the most holy Theotokos appeared to the Saint and revealed to him that it was pleasing to God that he fully end his reclusion; from this time the number of people who came to see him grew daily. It was also at the command of the holy Virgin that he undertook the spiritual direction of the Diveyevo Convent. He healed bodily ailments, foretold things to come, brought hardened sinners to repentance, and saw clearly the secrets of the heart of those who came to him. Through his utter humility and childlike simplicity, his unrivalled ascetical travails, and his angel-like love for God, he ascended to the holiness and greatness of the ancient God-bearing Fathers and became, like Anthony for Egypt, the physician for the whole Russian land. In all, the most holy Theotokos appeared to him twelve times in his life. The last was on Annunciation, 1831, to announce to him that he would soon enter into his rest. She appeared to him accompanied by twelve virgins martyrs and monastic saints with Saint John the Baptist and Saint John the Theologian. With a body ailing and broken from innumerable hardships, and an unspotted soul shining with the light of Heaven, the Saint lived less than two years after this, falling asleep in peace on January 2, 1833, chanting Paschal hymns. On the night of his repose, the righteous Philaret of the Glinsk Hermitage beheld his soul ascending to Heaven in light. Because of the universal testimony to the singular holiness of his life, and the seas of miracles that he performed both in life and after death, his veneration quickly spread beyond the boundaries of the Russian Empire to every corner of the earth. See also July 19.” (Great Horologion)
July 19 is the commemoration of the uncovering of St Seraphim’s holy relics, which was attended by Tsar Nicholas II.
Saint Seraphim’s life became a perpetual celebration of Pascha: in his later years he dressed in a white garment, greeted everyone, regardless of the season, with “Christ is Risen!” and chanted the Pascha service every day of the year.

Aspasius Jan 2 
+ c 560. Bishop of Auch in France, he took part in the Councils of Orleans in 533, 541 and 549, besides holding a Council in Auch in 551.

Blidulf (Bladulf) Jan 2 
+ c 630. A monk at Bobbio in Italy who bravely denounced the heresy of the Lombard King Ariovald.

Martinian (Maternian) Jan 2 
+ c 435. Bishop of Milan in Italy (423-c 435). He took part in the Third Oecumenical Council at Ephesus and wrote against Nestorianism.

Munchin Jan 2 
7th cent.? Probably the first Bishop and also patron-saint of Limerick in Ireland.

Rome (Martyrs of) Jan 2 
+ c 303. Many martyrs who suffered in Rome under Diocletian for refusing to give up the Holy Scriptures.

Silvester Dec 31 (In the East Jan 2) 
+ 335. Silvester came from Rome and served the Church as Pope from 314 to 335, helping convert St Constantine. Most of his relics are enshrined in San Silvestro in Capite in Rome.

Vincentian (Viance, Viants) Jan 2 
+ c 730. A disciple of St Menelaus, he became a hermit near Tulle in Auvergne in France.

Sylvester, Pope of Rome (335) – Jan 2
He was a native of Rome. Because of his virtue and love for all, the faithful made him Pope against his will upon the death of Pope Miltiades in 314. He was Pope when Constantine the Great ended the persecution of the Church, and personally instructed the Emperor in the Faith. Unable to attend the Council of Nicaea personally, he sent delegates to represent him and uphold the Orthodox faith there. He reposed in peace in 325.
Once, in a debate between the Saint and Zambrius, a Jewish scribe and occultist, Zambrius whispered a magic word in the ear of a bull, upon which the animal fell down dead. Zambrius then challenged the Pope to do as much in the name of Christ. The holy bishop replied, ‘My God gives life and resurrection, not death.’ Lifting his hands to heaven, he restored the creature to life. The Emperor and the crowd who witnessed the debate cheered the Saint, and many decided to be baptized.

Juliana of Lazarevskoye (1604) – Jan 2
The daughter of a devout and generous official in the Tsar’s court, she was orphaned at the age of six and reared by relatives. At the age of sixteen she was given in marriage to George Ossorguin, a nobleman who lived on an estate at Lavarevskoye, near Murom.
The couple were a model of Christian marriage. When her husband was at home, they would devote much of their time to praying together. When he was away in service to the Tsar, she would devote whole nights to prayer and handiwork. Since she was not free to give away her fortune as she desired, she earned money for almsgiving by the work of her hands, something unheard-of for a lady of her rank. When anyone died in the village she prayed for him at length, and if he were indigent she would pay for his funeral.
When two of the pious couple’s sons died, Juliana asked her husband to let her enter a monastery. He refused because they had other young children who needed her care; but he gave her permission to live a monastic life under his roof. From this time forward, she increased her fasts, spent her nights in prayer, and slept on the floor. When her husband died ten years later, her wealth was at her own disposal, and she devoted all of it to works of mercy. When her family criticized her for depriving herself so harshly, especially for her severe fasting, she answered ‘Whatever my body loses now won’t be food for worms later. What is the point of fattening the flesh only to lose the soul?’
From 1601 to 1603, Russia was struck for three years by the worst famine in its history, so severe that men ate human flesh in their desperation. Saint Juliana sold all her livestock, gave away all the provisions in her barns, and freed all her serfs who wished to leave. Those who remained became her family, with whom she shared all she had. By her prayers, bitter and inedible plants became palatable so that they could be made into bread. The holy woman, despite almost killing privation, never complained, but seemed more cheerful than ever before.
Saint Juliana reposed in peace at the age of seventy in 1604. At the moment of her death a bright halo was seen above her head. Ten years later her body was found incorrupt, and her tomb filled with a fragrant myrrh. She was venerated among the Russian people from that time forward, though it was not until 1988 that she was officially glorified by the Moscow Patriarchate.

Holy New Martyr George the Georgian (1770) – Jan 2
A native of Georgia, he was sold as a slave to a Turk and made a Muslim in his youth. He lived a long life as a Muslim, seemingly having no memory of the faith or language of his parents. Without warning, however, when he had reached the age of seventy, his conscience awakened, he presented himself to the judge and stated that he had been born a Christian and wished to die a Christian. The old man remained immovable under questioning, exhortation, threats and, finally, torture; he would only say ‘I am a Christian; I want to die a Christian!’ The executioners hanged him, then cut him down to see if this last trial would change his mind. When he assured them once again that he was a Christian, they hanged him again, and he was allowed to claim his martyrdom.

January 3

Antherus Jan 3 (In the East Aug 5) 
+ 236. A Greek who was Pope of Rome for only a few weeks. He may have been martyred and was buried in the catacomb of St Callistus, the first Pope to be so.

Bertilia Jan 3 
+ c 687. A noble virgin who took a vow of continence with her husband. On his death she lived as an anchoress near a church she had founded at Maroeuil (Marolles) in Flanders in Belgium.

Blitmund Jan 3 
+ 660 ? A monk at Bobbio in Italy. He followed St Walaricus (St Valéry) to France, where they founded the monastery of Leucone, later called Saint-Valéry. St Blitmund was the second abbot.

Prophet Malachi (~400 BC) Jan 3
He is the last of the twelve Minor Prophets and the last of all the Prophets of the Old Testament. His name means ‘My Angel’ or ‘My Messenger.’ He returned with the exiled Jews from Babylon and took part in the rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem. His prophecy announces to the ear of faith that the Lord will soon bring the Hebrew priesthood to an end in the coming of Christ, the Sun of Righteousness (Malachi 4:2), the eternal Priest.

Gordius of Caesarea (4th c.) Jan 3
“The Martyr Gordius, who was from Caesarea of Cappadocia, was a centurion by rank. Unable to bear the impiety of the heathen, he withdrew to the wilderness to purify himself through prayer and fasting. After he perceived that his ascetical training had prepared him sufficiently, he came down from the mountains when a certain pagan festival was held in Caesarea, attended by all, and presented himself to the multitude. Although the spectacles of the festival continued, no one paid them any heed, but all eyes were turned upon him. From his sojourn in the mountains, his look was wild, his beard was long, his raiment squalid, his body like a skeleton; yet a certain grace shone round about him. He was recognized, and a loud shout and tumult was made, as his fellow Christians rejoiced, and the enemies of the truth cried out for his death. He boldly professed his faith before the Governor, and after torments was beheaded, in the reign of Licinius in the year 314. Saint Basil the Great delivered a homily on Saint Gordius, mentioning that some of those in his audience had been present at the Saint’s martyrdom.” (Great Horologion)

Genevieve of Paris (~502) Jan 3
She was born near Paris to a family of wealthy landowners. When she was about ten years old St Germanus of Auxerre (July 31), passing through the region on his way to Britain, discerned a special divine purpose for her, and told her parents that she had been chosen for the salvation of many. “He asked her that day, and early the next, if she would consecrate herself to holy virginity for Christ and, on both occasions, she answered that it was her dearest wish. Then he blessed her and gave her a copper coin inscribed with the Cross to wear around her neck, telling her never to wear gold, silver or pearls, but to elevate her mind above the small beauties of this world in order to inherit eternal and heavenly adornments.” (Synaxarion)
Convents were unknown at that time in Gaul, so Genevieve lived as a solitary, in a cell in her own house, first with her parents then, after their death, with her godmother in Paris. She devoted herself to the poor, giving away everything that came into her hands, except the small amount that she needed to feed herself on bread and beans. (When she passed the age of fifty, she was commanded by the bishops to add some fish and milk to her diet). She kept Lent from Theophany to Pascha, during which time she never left her house. She was never afraid to rebuke the powerful for their oppression of the weak and the poor, and thus earned many powerful enemies; but the people’s love for her, and the support of the Church, kept her from persecution.
It became her custom to walk to church on Sundays in procession with her household and many pious laypeople. Once the candle borne at the front of the procession (it was still dark) blew out in a rainstorm. The Saint asked for the candle and, when she took it in her hand, it re-lit and stayed lighted until they reached the church. At several other times, candles lit spontaneously in her hand; for this reason her icon shows her holding a candle.
She traveled throughout Gaul (modern-day France) on church business, being greeted with all the honors usually accorded a bishop. Several times she saved the city of Paris from the assaults of barbarian tribes through her prayers, by pleading with barbarian chieftains, and once by organizing a convoy to bring grain to the besieged city.
Saint Genevieve reposed in peace at the age of eighty. Through the centuries since then, she has shown her holy protection of the city of Paris countless times, and her relics in the Church of Saint Genevieve have wrought innumerable healings. Her relics were many times carried in huge processions in times of war, pestilence or other national trial. These relics were mostly burned and thrown into the River Seine by the godless Revolutionaries in 1793, but, as the Synaxarion concludes, “those who continue to invoke Saint Genevieve with faith, find her to be well and truly alive.”

Daniel Jan 3 
+ 168. A deacon who helped St Prosdocimus, the first Bishop of Padua in Italy. He was martyred in 168.

Finlugh (Finlag) Jan 3 
6th cent. A brother of St Fintan, he went to Scotland, where he became one of St Columba’s disciples. Returning to Ireland, he became abbot of a monastery in Co. Derry.

Fintan Jan 3 
6th cent. A disciple of St Comgall at Bangor in Ireland. He is honoured as the patron-saint of Doon in Limerick where his holy well still exists.

Florentius of Vienne Jan 3 
3rd century? A martyred Bishop of Vienne in France.

Wenog Jan 3 
? An early saint in Wales.

January 4

Synaxis of the Seventy Apostles Jan 4
In addition to the Twelve Apostles, our Lord appointed seventy disciples to go forth and bring the Good News to the world (see Luke ch. 10). Others were later added to this company by the Holy Apostles, so that their number in fact exceeds seventy, though all are still referred to as “of the Seventy.”
On this day we also commemorate the company of those who have been sent forth by the Holy Spirit through the centuries to proclaim the joyous Gospel of Christ.

Aquilinus, Geminus, Eugene, Marcian, Quintus, Theodotus and Tryphon Jan 4 
c 484. A group of martyrs in North Africa under the Arian Hunneric, King of the Vandals.

Clement Nov 23 (In the East Jan 4, Apr 22, Sept 10 and Nov 25) 
+ c 101. One of the Seventy Apostles, he was the third Pope of Rome. Consecrated by the Apostle Peter, he is mentioned in Philippians 4,3 and wrote a letter to the Church of Corinth which still exists. He is venerated as a martyr and he is remembered in Rome by the church of San Clemente, which may have been built on the site of his home.

Dafrosa (Affrosa) Jan 4 
? Dafrosa, the mother of St Bibiana, was martyred in Rome under Julian the Apostate.

Ferreolus Jan 4 
+ 581. Born in Narbonne in France, he became Bishop of Uzès. He devoted himself in particular to converting Jews and was exiled by King Childebert on that account. He also founded a monastery.

Gregory of Langres Jan 4 
+ 539. A governor of Autun in France. Later in life he lost his wife, was ordained priest and became Bishop of Langres, gaining a reputation for gentleness and understanding. He was the father of St Tetricus and the great-uncle of St Gregory of Tours.

Libentius (Liäwizo) Jan 4 
938-1013. Born in Swabia in Germany, he became Bishop of Hamburg in 988.

Linus Sept 23 (In the East Jan 4 and Nov 5) 
+ c 79. The first Pope of Rome. A disciple of the Apostle Paul, he was one of the Seventy and is mentioned in 2 Timothy 4,21. He was Pope for twelve years (67-79) and is venerated as a martyr.

Mavilus (Majulus) Jan 4 
+ 212. A martyr in Hadrumetum in North Africa, thrown to wild beasts at the time of Caracalla.

Pharäildis (Vareide, Verylde, Veerle) Jan 4 
+ c 740. Probably born in Ghent in Belgium, she was married against her will. Maltreated by her husband, she became one of the patron-saints of Ghent.

Priscus, Priscillian and Benedicta Jan 4 
? Martyrs in Rome buried by their father, Flavian.

Rigobert Jan 4 
+ c 745. Monk and Abbot of Orbais in France, in 721 he became Archbishop of Rheims but some years later was banished by the Frank Charles Martel. He returned to Orbais and resumed monastic life. On being recalled to Rheims, he came to terms with the intruded bishop and himself became a hermit.

The Ethiopian Eunuch of Queen Candace Jan 4
His baptism by the holy Apostle Philip is told in Acts ch. 8. He was already seeking out the things of God — the story shows him reading the Book of Isaiah, and specifies that he was going to Jerusalem to worship. He returned home (“rejoicing”, say the scriptures) and proclaimed the Gospel of Christ in his native land; the ancient Church of Ethiopia traces its beginnings to his mission. He died a martyr’s death.

Apollinaria (5th c.) Jan 4
She was a maiden of high rank, the daughter of a magistrate named Anthimus in the city of Rome. Filled with love for Christ, she prevailed on her parents to allow her to travel on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. In Jerusalem she dismissed most of her attendants, gave her jewels, fine clothes and money to the poor, and went on to Egypt accompanied only by two trusted servants. Near Alexandria she slipped away from them and fled to a forest, where she lived in ascesis for many years. She then made her way to Sketis, the famous desert monastic colony, and presented herself as a eunuch named Dorotheos. In this guise she was accepted as a monk.
Anthimus, having lost his elder daughter, was visited with another grief: his younger daughter was afflicted by a demon. He sent this daughter to Sketis, asking the holy fathers there to aid her by their prayers. They put her under the care of “Dorotheos”, who after days of constant prayer effected the complete cure of her (unknowing) sister. When the girl got back home it was discovered that she was pregnant, and Anthimus angrily ordered that the monk who had cared for her be sent to him. He was astonished to find that “Dorotheos” was his own daughter Apollinaria, whom he had abandoned hope of seeing again. After some days the holy woman returned to Sketis, still keeping her identity secret from her fellow-monks. Only at her death was her true story discovered.

January 5

Eve of Theophany Jan 5

Holy Martyrs Theopemptus and Theonas (~290)

Theopemptus was a bishop (some say in Nicomedia) who contested for Christ during the fierce persecutions of the Emperor Diocletian. For openly confessing the Faith, he was arrested and brought before the Emperor himself, whom he fearlessly convicted for his cruelty and ungodliness. The saint was then subjected to several cruel tortures, from which he miraculously emerged unhurt. He was given a deadly poison to drink, prepared by a sorcerer named Theonas. When Theonas saw that the holy bishop was unharmed by his potion, he was led to confess Christ. Finally, St Theopemptus was beheaded, and Theonas thrown in a pit and buried alive.

Cera (Ciar, Cyra, Cior, Ceara) Jan 5 
7th cent. Born in Tipperary in Ireland, she was abbess of two convents, one at Kilkeary and the other at Tech Telle, now Tehelly.

Kiara (Chier) Jan 5 
+ c 680. A spiritual daughter of St Fintan Munnu. She lived in Ireland near Nenagh in Co. Tipperary, at a place now called Kilkeary after her.

Convoyon Jan 5 
+ 868. Born in Brittany, he became a monk and founded the monastery of St Saviour near Redon. He was driven out of his monastery by the Vikings and reposed in exile.

Syncletike (4th c.) Jan 5
She was the daughter of wealthy and devout parents in Alexandria. Though much desired as a bride for her great beauty, intelligence and wealth, she showed no interest in any worldly attraction and, when her parents died, gave away all of her large fortune. She then fled with her blind sister to the desert, where she became the foundress of monastic life for women in the Egyptian desert, just as St Anthony had for men. At first she attempted to struggle in solitude, hiding her ascetic labors from all and keeping strict silence before all people. But in time her holiness became known, and a company of young women formed around her, seeking to emulate and share in her way of life. At first she kept her silence even with them, but at last was forced out of love to give way to their pleas and reveal to them the wisdom that had been implanted in her. A settled monastic community grew around her, and she became known to all as Amma, the feminine form of the title Abba.
At the age of eighty-five, she was stricken with an agonizing cancer that slowly destroyed and putrefied her body. She bore these heavy trials with patience and thanksgiving, and told her disciples: “If illness strikes us, let us not be distressed as though physical exhaustion could prevent us from singing God’s praises; for all these things are for our good and for the purification of our desires. Fasting and ascesis are enjoined on us only because of our appetites; so if illness has blunted their edge, there is no longer any need for ascetic labors. To endure illness patiently and to send up thanksgiving to God is the greatest ascesis of all.”
Eventually her illness deprived her even of the power of speech, but it was said that the sight of her joyful and serene countenance amid her sufferings was better than any other teaching, and the faithful continued to flock to her to receive a blessing. After a three-month martyrdom, she departed this life, having predicted the day of her death.
It is said that St Syncletike was the virgin who sheltered St Athanasius the Great when he was driven into hiding for more than a year by the Arians. Her biography, which the Synaxarion calls “one of the basic texts of Orthodox spirituality,” is attributed to St Athanasius.

Emiliana Jan 5 
6th cent. A Roman lady and the paternal aunt of St Gregory the Great, from whom we know of her saintly life, visions and repose.

Gaudentius of Gnesen Jan 5 
+ c 1004. Younger brother of St Adalbert of Prague and also a monk at the monastery of Sant’ Alessio on the Aventine in Rome. He escaped the massacre in which his brother was martyred by the pagan Prussians and in 1000 became first Archbishop of Gnesen in Poland.

Telesphorus Jan 5 (In the East Feb 22) 
+ c 136. A Greek who was Pope of Rome for ten years and was martyred under Hadrian.

January 6

The Holy Theophany of our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ Jan 6
‘About the beginning of our Lord’s thirtieth year, John the Forerunner, who was some six months older than our Saviour according to the flesh, and had lived in the wilderness since his childhood, received a command from God and came into the parts of the Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance unto the remission of sins. Then our Saviour also came from Galilee to the Jordan, and sought and received baptism though He was the Master and John was but a servant. Whereupon, there came to pass those marvellous deeds, great and beyond nature: the Heavens were opened, the Spirit descended in the form of a dove upon Him that was being baptized, and the voice was heard from the Heavens bearing witness that this was the beloved Son of God, now baptized as a man (Matt. 3:13 17; Mark 1:9 11; Luke 3:1 22). From these events the Divinity of the Lord Jesus Chist and the great mystery of the Trinity were demonstrated. It is also from this that the present feast is called “Theophany,” that is, the divine manifestation, God’s appearance among men. On this venerable day the sacred mystery of Christian baptism was inaugurated; henceforth also began the saving preaching of the Kingdom of Heaven.’ (Great Horologion)
When Thou was baptized in the Jordan, O Lord, the worship of the Trinity was made manifest; for the voice of the Father bare witness to Thee, calling Thee His beloved Son. And the Spirit in the form of a dove confirmed the certainty of the word. O Christ our God, Who hast appeared and hast enlightened the world,glory be to Thee. — Troparion of Theophany
‘But Christ’s descent into the river has also a further significance. When Christ went down into the waters, not only did he carry us down with Him and make us clean, but He also made clean the nature of the waters themselves… The feast of Theophany has thus a cosmic aspect. The fall of the angelic orders, and after it the fall of man, involved the whole universe. All God’s creation was thereby warped and disfigured: to use the symbolism of the liturgical texts, the waters were made a “lair of dragons”. Christ came on earth to redeem not only man but through man the entire material creation. When He entered the water, besides effecting by anticipation our rebirth in the font, he likewise effected the cleansing of the waters, their transfiguration into an organ of healing and grace.’ Bishop Kallistos, “Background and meaning of the Feasts” in the Festal Menaion.
The western feast of Epiphany, also on this day, commemorates not Christ’s baptism but the adoration of the Magi.

Africa, Martyrs of North-West Africa Jan 6 
+ c 210. A number of Christians of both sexes burnt at the stake under Septimius Severus.

Anastasius Jan 6 
4th cent. A martyr in Syrmium in Pannonia, now Hungary.

Anastasius, Jucundus, Florus, Florianus, Peter, Ratites, Tatia and Tilis Jan 6 
4th cent. Martyred in Syrmium in Pannonia, now Hungary.

Diman (Dimas, Dima) Jan 6 
+ 658. A monk with St Columba and afterwards Bishop of Connor in Ireland.

Edeyrn Jan 6 
6th cent. Born in Britain, he was hermit and the patron saint of a church in Brittany.

Eigrad Jan 6 
6th cent. A brother of St Samson, he was a disciple of St Illtyd and founded a church in Anglesey in Wales.

Frederick of Arras Jan 6 
+ 1020. Son of the Count of Verdun in France, he gave his inheritance to the Bishop of Verdun. He then set out for Palestine and on his return became a monk at St Vanne and later St Vedast in Arras.

Hywyn Jan 6 
+ 516. Probably a companion of St Cadfan on his return journey from Brittany to Cornwall and Wales. By tradition he founded Aberdaron in Gwynedd.

Macra Jan 6 
+ 287. A holy virgin from Rheims in France, she was martyred in Fismes in Champagne before the persecution under Diocletian began.

Melanius (Melaine) Jan 6 
+ c 535. Born in Brittany, he was Bishop of Rennes and succeeded in overcoming idolatry in his diocese.

Merinus Jan 6 
6th cent. A disciple of Dunawd at Bangor in Wales and venerated there and in Brittany.

Peter of Canterbury Jan 6 
+ c 607. A monk from St Andrew’s in Rome, he was one of the first missionaries sent to England. He became first Abbot of Sts Peter and Paul (later St Augustine’s), founded in Canterbury. While travelling to France he was drowned off Ambleteuse near Boulogne, where his relics are still honoured.

Schotin (Scarthin) Jan 6 
6th cent. While still a youth, Schotin left Ireland to become a disciple of St David in Wales. On his return to his native country he lived as a hermit on Mt Mairge in Leix for many years.

Wiltrudis Jan 6 
+ c 986. After her husband’s death (c 947), she founded (c 976) the convent of Bergen near Neuburg in Germany and herself became a nun and the first abbess.

January 7

The Synaxis of the Venerable and Illustrious Prophet, Forerunner and Baptist of the Lord, John. Jan 7
On the day after a great Feast we usually honor the servant of the Mystery; today we honor him who baptized the Lord: the blessed Forerunner, “greatest of the Prophets, most noble of those born of women, voice of the Word, herald of Grace, swallow presaging the spiritual spring, torch and beacon of the divine Light, spiritual dawn announcing the Sun of Righteousness, and as terrestrial angel and celestial man, stationed at the border of heaven and earth, uniting the Old and the New Testaments” (Synaxarion).
New Martyr Athanasius of Attalia (1700)
A native of Attalia, he lived in Smyrna. Once he unguardedly spoke the opening words of the Muslim confession of faith, “There is no god but God.” Hearing this, some Turks immediately surrounded him and took him to the court, claiming that he had embraced Islam. This he vehemently denied, assuring them that he was a Christian and that the words he had spoken would be unremarkable to any Christian. He was thrown into prison as an apostate and, after a sham trial, beheaded. His body was thrown to the dogs, but the usually voracious animals refused to touch his body, and it was removed by some pious Christians and given honorable burial.

Cedd, Bishop of Essex and Abbot of Lastingham (664)
He and his brother Chad (Mar. 2) were from an English family, educated under Saint Aidan (Aug. 31) of Lindisfarne. Both brothers entered monastic life at Lindisfarne and later became bishops. Cedd travelled as an evangelist among the people of Essex, where Saint Finan (Feb. 17) consecrated him to be their first bishop. He founded two monasteries in Essex, one of whose churches still stands; he built yet another monastery at Lastingham in Yorkshire, where he lived until his repose. He spoke both Irish and Anglo-Saxon, and served as a translator for the Irish at the Synod of Whitby in 664. He reposed at Lastingham not long after the Synod.

Aldericus (Aldric, Audry) Jan 7 
+ 856. Bishop of Le Mans in France (832), he excelled as a saintly prelate and as an able administrator. Some of his works survive.

Anastasius Jan 7 
+ 977. Archbishop of Sens from 968 to 977, he began building the Cathedral and greatly helped the monks of Saint-Pierre-le-Vif, in whose church he was buried.

Brannoc Jan 7 
? Born in Wales, he crossed to Devon in England and founded a monastery in Braunton.

Crispin Jan 7 
5th century. Bishop of Pavia in Italy, he signed the acts of the Council of Milan.

Cronan Beg Jan 7 
7th cent. A Bishop of Aendrum in Co. Down in Ireland.

Emilian (Aemilio) Jan 7 
+ 767. Born in Vannes in France, he was a monk at Saujon near Saintes and died as a hermit in the forest of Combes near Bordeaux.

Kentigerna Jan 7 
+ 734. Daughter of Kelly, prince of Leinster and mother of St Coellan. After her husband’s death she left Ireland and became an anchoress on the island of Inchebroida on Loch Lomond in Scotland, where a church is dedicated to her.

Reinold (Rainald, Reynold) Jan 7 
+ 960. A monk at the monastery of St Pantaleon in Cologne in Germany. He was killed by stonemasons who threw his body into a pool near the Rhine. It was later found by divine revelation.

Tillo (Thillo, Thielman, Théau, Tilloine, Tillon, Tilman) Jan 7 
+ c 702. Born in Saxony in Germany, he was abducted by robbers and enslaved. Freed by St Eligius of Noyon, he became a monk at Solignac and enlightened the area around Tournai and Courtrai in Belgium.

Valentine Jan 7 
+ c 470. An abbot who became a bishop in Rhaetia. He reposed in Mais in the Tyrol in Austria. Some years later his relics were translated to Trent and then to Passau.

Wittikund Jan 7 
+ c 804. A noble from Westphalia in Germany, he was converted by a vision and baptised in 785. He was zealous in spreading Christianity and restoring churches.

January 8

Albert of Cashel Jan 8 
7th cent. Patron-saint of Cashel in Ireland. According to some, he had been born in England, laboured in Ireland and later preached in Bavaria. He then went to Jerusalem and on his return reposed and was buried in Regensburg.

Athelhelm (Athelm) Jan 8 
+ 923. Paternal uncle of St Dunstan. A monk and then Abbot of Glastonbury in England, he became first Bishop of Wells in Somerset and in 923 twenty-first Archbishop of Canterbury.

Ergnad (Ercnacta) Jan 8 
5th cent. Born in Ulster in Ireland, she was made a nun by St Patrick.

Erhard Jan 8 
+ c 686. Born in Ireland, he preached the Gospel as a bishop in Bavaria in Germany, mainly around Regensburg.

Eugenian Jan 8 
4th cent. Bishop of Autun in France, he was a staunch defender of Orthodoxy against Arianism, for which he was martyred.

Frodobert Jan 8 
+ c 673. A monk at Luxeuil in France, he founded the monastery of Moutier-la-Celle near Troyes, where he led a life of unceasing prayer and asceticism.

Garibaldus Jan 8 
+ 762. First Bishop of Regensburg in Germany. He was consecrated by St Boniface in c 740. He had probably been Abbot of St Emmeran in Regensburg before this.

Gudula (Goule) Jan 8 
+ 712. Daughter of St Amelberga, she spent much time with St Gertrude at Nivelles and afterwards lived a life of holiness. She is the patroness of Brussels in Belgium.

Lucian, Maximian and Julian Jan 8 
+ c 290. Martyrs in Beauvais in the north of France.

Maximus Jan 8 
+ 511. Bishop of Pavia in Italy, he attended Councils in Rome under Pope Symmachus.

Patiens Jan 8 
2nd cent. Venerated as the fourth Bishop and patron-saint of Metz in France.

Pega Jan 8 
+ c 719. The sister of St Guthlac of Crowland in England. She too lived as an anchoress. The village of Peakirk (Pega’s church) in Northamptonshire is called after her.

Severinus Jan 8 
+ 482. An Eastern monk who enlightened Noricum Ripense, now in Austria. He founded several monasteries, notably one on the Danube near Vienna, where he organised help for those afflicted by the invasions of Attila and the Huns and where he reposed. Six years after his repose, the monks were driven out and took his relics to Naples in Italy, where the monastery of San Severino was built to enshrine them.

Wulsin Jan 8 
+ 1002. A monk whom St Dunstan loved as a son and made Abbot of Westminster in 980. In 993 he became Bishop of Sherborne.

Domnica (Domnina) (~474) Jan 8
She was born in Rome and reared in the love of Christ. She secretly left her parents’ house and traveled by ship to Alexandria, where she found lodging with four virtuous pagan maidens. By her example and counsel these four were in time led to abandon idolatry and embrace Domnica’s faith. The five then sailed to Constantinople, where it is said that the Patriarch Nectarius (October 11) was notified of their coming by an angel and met them at the dock. The Patriarch baptized the four maidens himself, giving them the names Dorothea, Evanthia, Nonna and Timothea, then settle them and Domnica in a monastery.
Soon the fame of Domnica’s pure life, wise teaching, and wondrous healings spread throughout the city, and even the Emperor Theodosius, with the Empress and his court, came to see her. Soon the crowds made it impossible for her and her sisters to live the heavenly life for which they had entered the monastery; so they relocated the monastery to a remote, demon-haunted location where executions had once commonly been performed, since everyone avoided the area. Here a new monastery was built by order of the Emperor, and the sisters found peace.
Saint Domnica’s fame continued, and she became not only a healer but an oracle for the city of Constantinople, prophesying the death of the Emperor Theodosius and the unrest which followed it. She reposed in peace, having first entrusted the care of the monastery to Dorothea. At the moment of her death, the whole monastery was shaken, and those present saw Saint Domnica dressed as a bride, being borne heavenward escorted by a company of white-clad monks and nuns.

Atticus, Patriarch of Constantinople (425) Jan 8
Born in Sebaste in Armenia, he was reared by monks who held to the heresy of Macedonius, which denied the uncreated divinity of the Holy Spirit; but when he came of age he rejected this error and embraced the Orthodox faith. He settled in Constantinople and became a priest in the Great Church. Though he had little formal education, his amazing memory, his zeal for Christ, and his powerful sermons recommended him to all, and he was elected Patriarch in 406, during the reign of the Emperor Arcadius. He served as shepherd to the Church for twenty years, ruling always with wisdom and moderation. Though he was unbending in upholding the Faith exactly, he took a conciliatory, persuasive approach to heretics and schismatics; in this way he was able to restore many to the Church rather than driving them away. His best-known single act is his restoration of the name of St John Chrysostom to the diptychs. Saint John had been unjustly denied commemoration in the Patriarchate since his exile, which had led to a schism; restoration of his commemoration not only corrected a grave injustice but healed a schism. Saint Atticus also presided over the rededication of the Agia Sophia, which had been burned in 404 in the rioting that followed St John Chrysostom’s exile. He reposed in peace in 425.
Saint Severinus (482)
St. Severinus came to the borderland of present-day Gemany and Austria from the east — possibly the Egyptian desert — to care for the Roman Christians who were endangered by invading barbarians during the collapse of the Roman Empire. He remained there until the end of his life. While he was there he advised both common people and kings to put eternal life first, and taught them to be generous to one another and to lead a true Christian life. He built a monastery and protected from harm those who gathered around him. As he foretold, the monks and other Christians who had followed him escaped to saftety in Italy, taking St. Severinus’ incorrupt relics with them. His relics are still honored in Frattamaggiore, Italy (near Naples).
—from the 2006 Saint Herman Calendar

January 9

Adrian Jan 9 
+ 710. Born in North Africa, he became Abbot of Nerida not far from Naples in Italy. Chosen to be Archbishop of Canterbury, he declined the office and recommended instead St Theodore of Tarsus, with whom he came to England. He became Abbot of Sts Peter and Paul, later called St Augustine’s in Canterbury. He was eminent for his holiness and his learning.

Brithwald (Brihtwald) Jan 9 
+ 731. He became a monk and the Abbot of Reculver in Kent in England. In 693 he became the ninth Archbishop of Canterbury.

Epictetus, Jucundus, Secundus, Vitalis, Felix and Companions Jan 9 
+ ? 250. Twelve martyrs in North Africa, who probably suffered under Decian. Epictetus was a bishop mentioned by St Cyprian.

Foellan (Foilan, Fillan) Jan 9 
8th cent. Born in Ireland, he accompanied his mother, St Kentigerna, and his relative, St Comgan, to Scotland, where he lived as a monk. The place of repose is called Strathfillan.

Marcellinus of Ancona Jan 9 
+ c 566. Born in Ancona in Italy, he became bishop there in c 550.

Marciana Jan 9 
+ c 303. A virgin-martyr in Mauritania in North Africa. Accused of breaking a statue of a goddess, she was thrown to the wild beasts and gored to death by a bull.

Maurontus (Maurontius, Mauruntius) Jan 9 
+ c 700. Founder of the monastery of Saint-Florent-le-Vieil on the Loire in France.

Paschasia Jan 9 
+ c 178 (?) A virgin martyr venerated from ancient times in Dijon in France.

Waningus (Vaneng) Jan 9 
+ c 686. Born near Rouen, he became a monk and helped St Wandrille found Fontenelle. Soon after he himself founded another important monastery in Fécamp in France.

January 10

Agatho Jan 10 (In the East Jan 20) 
+ 681. Pope of Rome from 678 to 681. A Sicilian from Palermo, he called for the holding of the Sixth Oecumenical Council in Constantinople in 680 against Monothelitism.

Dermot (Diarmis, Diarmaid) Jan 10 
6th cent. The spiritual father of St Kieran of Clonmacnois and later founder of a monastery on Innis-Clotran Island in Ireland.

John Camillus the Good Jan 10 
+ c 660. Bishop of Milan in Italy. He worked against Arianism and Monothelitism.

Peter Urseolus Jan 10 
928-987. Born in Venice in Italy, at the age of twenty Peter became Admiral of the Venetian fleet. In 976 he became Doge of Venice. After two years, he disappeared from Venice to become a monk at the monastery of Cuxa in Spain, where he later lived as a hermit.

Petronius Jan 10 
+ c 463. Born in Avignon, he became a monk at Lérins and Bishop of Die in France from c 456 to 463.

Sethrid (Saethryth) Jan 10 
+ c 660. Stepdaughter of Anna, King of East Anglia. She became a nun at Faremoutiers-en-Brie in France under St Fara, whom she succeeded as abbess. She was the half-sister of Sts Etheldred (Audrey) and Ethelburgh.

Thomian (Toimen) Jan 10 
+ c 660. Archbishop of Armagh in Ireland 623-c 660.

January 11

Alexander Jan 11 
? Born in Fermo near Ancona in Italy, he became bishop of his native city and was martyred under Decius. His relics are enshrined in the Cathedral.

Anastasius Jan 11 
+ c 570. A notary of the Roman church, he became monk and Abbot of Castel Sant’ Elia in Italy. St Gregory the Great narrates that St Anastasius and his monks reposed, at the call of an angel, in quick succession.

Boadin Jan 11 
? Born in Ireland, he lived as a monk in France.

Brandan Jan 11 
5th cent. Born in Ireland, he took refuge from Pelagianism in Britain and then in France, at a monastery where he became abbot.

Ethenia and Fidelmia Jan 11 
+ 433. Daughters of King Laoghaire in Ireland and among the first converts of St Patrick, they became nuns and reposed in holiness.

Honorata Jan 11 
+ c 500. The sister of St Epiphanius, Bishop of Pavia in Italy. She was a nun at Pavia when Odoacer, King of the Heruli, captured her. She was ransomed by her brother and returned to Pavia.

Hyginus Jan 11 
+ c 140. Pope of Rome from c 138 to 140, he may also have been a martyr.

Leucius of Brindisi Jan 11 
+ c 180. Venerated as the first Bishop of Brindisi in Italy where he had come as a missionary from Alexandria.

Paldo, Taso and Tato Jan 11 
8th cent. Three brothers, born in Benevento in Italy, who became monks at Farfa and eventually founded the monastery of San Vincenzo at the headwaters of the Volturno. Of this they successively became abbots, Paldo reposing in c 720, Taso in c 729, and Tato in c 739.

Salvius Jan 11 
? A martyr in North Africa.

January 12

Arcadius Jan 12 
+ c 302 A prominent citizen of Caesarea near Algiers in North Africa, who under Maximianus Herculeus was slowly and barbarously mutilated until he died under torture.

Benedict Biscop Jan 12 
c 628-c 690 Born in Northumbria, Biscop Baducing made two pilgrimages to Rome early in life and after the second became a monk at Lérins. After a third journey to Rome, bringing back books and icons, he returned to England and founded the monastery of Wearmouth and Jarrow (674-682). He visited Rome twice more after that.

Caesaria Jan 12 
+ c 530. The gifted sister of St Caesarius of Arles and abbess of the convent founded there by her brother.

John of Ravenna Jan 12 
+ 494. Bishop of Ravenna in Italy from 452 to 494. He saved his flock from the fury of Attila the Hun and mitigated its lot when the city was taken by Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths.

Probus Jan 12 
+ c 59. Bishop of Verona in Italy

Salvius (Salve, Sauve) Jan 12 
+ c 625. Bishop of Amiens in the north of France. His relics were enshrined in Montreuil in Picardy.

Tatiana and Companions Jan 12 
+ c 225. A renowned virgin-martyr of the eminent Tatian family tortured and slain for the Orthodox Faith together with others in Rome.

Victorian of Asan Jan 12 
+ c 560. Born in Italy, he went to France and founded Asan (called San Victorian after him) in the Pyrenees in Spain.

Zoticus, Rogatus, Modestus, Castulus and Companions Jan 12 
? A group of between forty and fifty soldiers martyred in North Africa.

January 13

Agrecius (Agritius) Jan 13 
+ c 333. Bishop of Trier in Germany and predecessor of St Maximinus. He took part in the Council of Arles in 314. According to a late Life, composed in the eleventh century, he was aided by St Helen, who procured for him the garment of our Lord, known as the Holy Coat of Trier.

Andrew Jan 13 
+ c 235. The twelfth Bishop of Trier in Germany, whom some chroniclers also call a martyr.

Berno Jan 13 
+ 927. Born in Burgundy in France, he became a monk at St Martin in Autun. He restored Baume-les-Messieurs and founded monasteries at Gigny, Bourg-Dieu, Massay and Cluny (910), where he was abbot until 926.

Elian (Eilan, Allan) Jan 13 
6th cent. Probably born in Cornwall, he belonged to the family of St Ismael. Llanelian in Anglesey and Llanelian in Clwyd are named after him and St Allen’s church in Cornwall is dedicated to him.

Elian ap Erbin Jan 13 
? 5th cent. A saint in Wales.

Enogatus Jan 13 
+ 631. The fifth successor of St Malo as Bishop of Aleth in Brittany.

Erbin (Ervan, Erbyn, Erme or Hermes) Jan 13 
? 5th cent. Churches were dedicated to him in Cornwall.

Gumesindus and Servusdei Jan 13 
+ 852. Two martyrs, one a parish-priest, the other a monk, who suffered in Cordoba in Spain under Abderrahman II.

Hilary Jan 13 
315-368. Born in Poitiers in France of pagan patrician parents, he married early in life. Shortly after he became Orthodox and in 353 he became Bishop of Poitiers. At once he began a campaign against Arianism and for this reason was exiled to Phrygia by the Arian Emperor Constantius. But in Phrygia he was even more objectionable to the Arians, who clamoured for his recall. He returned to Poiters in 360.

Kentigern Mungo Jan 13 
+ 603. The name Mungo means ‘darling’. He began preaching in Cathures on the Clyde on the site of the city of Glasgow and was consecrated first Bishop of the Strathclyde Britons. Driven into exile, he preached around Carlisle and then went to Wales, where he stayed with St David at Menevia. Returning to Scotland, he continued his labours, making Glasgow his centre. He is venerated as the Apostle of north-west England and south-west Scotland.

Potitus Jan 13 
? A boy venerated as a martyr near Naples in Italy.

Rome (Martyrs of) Jan 13 
+ 262. Forty soldiers who suffered on the Via Lavicana in Rome under Gallienus.

Viventius Jan 13 
+ c 400. An eastern priest who travelled to the West and attached himself to St Hilary of Poitiers. He ended his life as a hermit.

January 14

Datius Jan 14 
+ 552. Bishop of Milan in Italy. His diocese was overrun by Arian Ostrogoths and he had to flee to Constantinople where he spent the rest of his life.

Deusdedit Jan 14 
+ 664. Born in England and baptised Frithona, he was the first Englishman to become Archbishop of Canterbury, succeeding St Honorius in 655.

Euphrasius Jan 14 
? A bishop martyred in North Africa by the Arian Vandals.

Felix of Nola Jan 14 
+ c 250. The son of a Romano-Syrian soldier who had settled in Nola near Naples in Italy. Felix was ordained a priest and devoted himself to his bishop, St Maximus, especially during the persecution which broke out under Decius. On account of his sufferings during the persecution, he was sometimes referred to as a martyr.

Felix Jan 14 
? A priest in Rome.

January 15

Blaithmaic (Blathmac, Blaithmale) Jan 15 
+ c 823. An abbot from Ireland who went to Scotland and was martyred by the Danes on the altar steps of the church of Iona.

Bonitus (Bont) Jan 15 
623-c 710. Born in Auvergne in France, he became Bishop of Clermont. After ten years as bishop he resigned and lived as a monk, reposing in extreme old age.

Ceolwulf Jan 15 
+ 764. King of Northumbria in England, he encouraged monastic life. St Bede dedicated his Ecclesiastical History to him. He ended his days as a monk at Lindisfarne.

Emebert (Ablebert) Jan 15 
+ c 710. A brother of Sts Reineldis and Gudula, he became Bishop of Cambrai in France.

Ephysius Jan 15 
+ 303. A much-venerated martyr in Sardinia, under Diocletian.

Eugyppius Jan 15 
+ c 511. Born in North Africa, he was ordained priest at Rome and was a companion of St Severinus of Noricum in Austria, whose Life he wrote.

Ita (Ytha, Meda) Jan 15 
+ c 570. She is second only to St Bridget in popular veneration in Ireland. She was born in Drum in Co. Waterford and founded the convent of Hy Conaill in Co. Limerick, attracting many to the monastic life.

Lleudadd (Laudatus) Jan 15 
6th cent. Abbot of Bardsey in Wales, he accompanied St Cadfan to Brittany.

Malard Jan 15 
+ c 650. A Bishop of Chartres in France, present at the Council of Châlon-sur-Saône (650).

Maura and Britta Jan 15 
? 4th cent. Two holy virgins in France.

Maximus of Nola Jan 15 
+ c 250. Bishop of Nola in Italy. He ordained St Felix. During the persecution of Decius he fled to the mountains, where he nearly died of exposure and hunger. He reposed in Nola worn out by the hardships he had endured for the Faith.

Sawl Jan 15 
6th cent. The father of St Asaph of Wales.

Secundina Jan 15 
+ c 250. A virgin-martyr scourged to death near Rome in the persecution of Decius.

Tarsicia (Tarsitia) Jan 15 
+ c 600. An anchoress who lived near Rodez in France.

January 16

Dunchaid O’Braoin Jan 16 
+ 988. Born in Westmeath in Ireland, he lived as a hermit near the monastery of Clonmacnoise until the year 969, when he became abbot there.

Ferreolus (Fergéol) Jan 16 
+ c 670. Bishop of Grenoble in France.

Fulgentius Jan 16 
+ c 633. Brother of Sts Isidore and Leander of Seville in Spain and of St Florentina. He was Bishop of Ecija in Andalusia and one of the leaders of the Spanish Church of that time.

Fursey Jan 16 
+ c 648. Having founded a monastery at Rathmat in Ireland, he went to England and founded another at Burgh Castle in Suffolk. He finally moved to France and founded a monastery at Lagny near Paris. He was buried in Picardy. His life is famous for his remarkable visions.

Honoratus of Arles Jan 16 
c 350-429. Probably born in Lorraine of a Roman consular family, he renounced paganism in his youth and went to the East to learn from monasticism. Returning to France, he founded a monastery on the Mediterranean island of Lérins. In 426 he was forced to become Archbishop of Arles, but reposed three years later.

Honoratus of Fondi Jan 16 
6th cent. Founder of the monastery of Fondi in Italy.

James of Tarentaise Jan 16 
? 429. A Syrian by origin, he became a monk with St Honoratus at Lérins and was venerated at Chambéry as an Apostle of Savoy in France and the first Bishop of Tarentaise.

Liberata Jan 16 
5th cent. Sister of St Epiphanius of Pavia in Italy and St Honorata.

Marcellus Jan 16 (June 7 in the East) 
+ 309. Pope of Rome from 308 to 309 and suffered for confessing the faith.

Priscilla Jan 16 
1st cent. The wife of Manius Acilius Glabrio and mother of the senator Pudens. The tradition is that she was the hostess in Rome of the Apostle Peter. His headquarters were at her villa near the Roman catacombs which to this day bear her name.

Titian Jan 16 
+ 650. For thirty years a bishop near Venice in Italy.

Triverius Jan 16 
+ 550. Born in Neustria, he showed spiritual sensitivity from childhood. He lived as a hermit near the monastery of Thérouanne until he moved to Dombes. The village of Saint Trivier in France commemorates his name.

Valerius Jan 16 
+ c 453. A hermit taken from his solitude by the people of Sorrento in Italy, who made him their bishop.

January 17

Antony, Merulus and John Jan 17 
6th cent. Three monks at St Andrew’s on the Coelian Hill in Rome. St Gregory the Great, who was their Abbot, has left an account of their virtues and miraculous power.

Genulfus (Genou) and Genitus Jan 17 
? 3rd cent. Two monks who lived in Celle-sur-Naton in France.

Joseph of Freising Jan 17 
+ 764. A monk who in 752 founded the monastery of St Zeno at Isen. In 764 he became third Bishop of Freising in Germany. His relics are in Isen.

Mildgyth Jan 17 
+ c 676. The youngest of the three holy virgins of Minster-in-Thanet in England – Milburgh, Mildred and Mildgyth.

Nennius Jan 17 
6th cent. A disciple of St Finian of Clonard, reckoned as one of the ‘Twelve Apostles of Ireland’.

Richimirus Jan 17 
+ c 715. Under the patronage of the Bishop of Le Mans in France he founded a monastery, later called Saint-Rigomer-des-Bois after him.

Sulpicius (II) the Pious Jan 17 
+ 647. Bishop of Bourges in France from 624 to 647. He devoted himself to the care and defence of the poor and persecuted.

January 18

Archelais, Thecla and Susanna Jan 18 
+ 293. Three holy virgins of the Romagna in Italy who went to Nola in the Campagna in order to escape death, but there too they were accused of being Orthodox, were tortured, taken to Salerno and beheaded.

Deicola (Deicolus, Desle, Dichul, Deel, Delle, Deille) Jan 18 
+ c 625. A monk at Bangor in Ireland, he followed St Columbanus to Burgundy in France, where he helped found the monastery of Luxeuil. Later he founded a second monastery in Lure in the Vosges.

Leobard (Liberd) Jan 18 
+ 593. A hermit in Tours in France near the monastery of Marmoutier for twenty-two years.

Liberata Jan 18 
+ 580. A holy virgin in Como in Italy where with her sister St Faustina she founded the convent of Santa Margarita. Both reposed in 580. Their relics are in Como Cathedral.

Prisca Jan 18 
3rd cent. (?) A virgin-martyr venerated from ancient times in Rome, where a church is dedicated to her on the Aventine.

Ulfrid (Wolfred, Wilfrid) Jan 18 
+ 1028. Born in England, he became a missionary in Germany and Sweden. He was martyred for destroying an image of Thor.

Volusian Jan 18 
+ 496. A married senator who was chosen Bishop of Tours in France and shortly after driven out by Arian Visigoths. He reposed in Toulouse.

January 19

Arcontius Jan 19 
8th or 9th cent. Bishop of Viviers in France, killed by a mob for having upheld the rights of the Church.

Bassian Jan 19 
+ 413. Born in Sicily, he became Bishop of Lodi in Lombardy in Italy. He was much esteemed by St Ambrose of Milan, with whom he attended the Council of Aquilia (381) and at whose repose he was present (390).

Branwallader Jan 19 
? 6th cent. A bishop in Jersey in the Channel Islands. King Athelstan, who founded the monastery of Milton in Dorset in England translated relics of the saint there in 935.

Catellus Jan 19 
9th cent. Bishop of Castellamare to the south of Naples in Italy. He is venerated as the main patron-saint of the town.

Contestus Jan 19 
+ c 510. Bishop of Bayeux in France from 480 on.

Firminus Jan 19 
? Third Bishop of Gabales (Gévaudan) in France.

Lomer (Laudomarus) Jan 19 
+ 593. A shepherd boy near Chartres in France and then priest, he became a hermit. Disciples came and he founded the monastery of Corbion near Chartres. He lived to be over a hundred.

Marius (Maris), Martha, Audifax and Abachum Jan 19 
+ c 270. Marius, a Persian nobleman, his wife Martha, and their two sons, Audifax and Abachum, travelled to Rome to venerate the tombs of the Apostles. While there, they also buried the bodies of those being martyred in the persecution of Claudius II. They too were arrested, the three men beheaded and St Martha drowned.

Messalina Jan 19 
+ 251. A holy virgin in Foligno in Italy. She visited Bishop Felician of Foligno in prison, was denounced as a Christian and clubbed to death.

Nathalan Jan 19 
+ c 678. Born of a wealthy family in Scotland, he became a hermit and was praised for earning his living by tilling the soil, ‘which comes closest to divine contemplation’. He became a bishop and lived in Tullicht.

Paul, Gerontius, Januarius, Saturninus, Successus, Julius, Catus, Pia and Germana Jan 19 
2nd cent. (?) Martyrs in Numidia in North Africa.

Pontian Jan 19 
+ 169. A martyr in Spoleto in Italy under Marcus Aurelius.

Remigius Jan 19 
+ c 772. Bishop of Rouen in France from 755 on.

January 20

Agatho Jan 10 (In the East Jan 20) 
+ 681. Pope of Rome from 678 to 681. A Sicilian from Palermo, he called for the holding of the Sixth Oecumenical Council in Constantinople in 680 against Monothelitism.

Fabian Jan 20 (In the East Aug 5) 
+ 250. Fabian succeeded St Antherus as Pope of Rome in 236 and was martyred in 250 under Decius. St Cyprian described him as an ‘incomparable man’ and added that the glory of his death matched the purity and goodness of his life.

Fechin Jan 20 
+ c 665. Born in Connaught in Ireland, he founded several monasteries. His name is connected with Fobhar (Fore) in Westmeath. Ecclefechan and St Vigean’s near Arbroath in Scotland are also called after him.

Maurus Jan 20 
+ 946. He became monk and Abbot of Classe in Ravenna in Italy (926), and finally Bishop of Cesena. He built for himself a cell on a hill near the city, where he spent part of his time in prayer. After his repose the cell grew into the monastery of Santa Maria del Monte.

Molagga (Laicin) Jan 20 
+ c 655. Born in Ireland, he was a disciple of St David in Wales. He founded a monastery in Fulachmhin (Fermoy) in Ireland.

Sebastian Jan 20 
+ ? 288. One of the most renowned of all the martyrs of Rome. According to his Life, he was an officer in the imperial army and a favourite of Diocletian. Nevertheless, when he was discovered to be Orthodox no mercy was shown him. Tied to a tree, his body was made a target for Roman archers and he was finally martyred with clubs. His church is one of the seven main churches in Rome.

January 21

Agnes Jan 21 
+ c 305. A virgin-martyr in Rome, aged only twelve or thirteen, she suffered and was buried by the Via Nomentana in Rome, where a basilica in her honour has stood since the fourth century. St Ambrose, St Damasus and Prudentius sang her praises and she is a patroness of chastity.

Brigid (Briga) Jan 21 
6th cent. Known as St Brigid of Kilbride, she is venerated around Lismore in Ireland.

Epiphanius Jan 21 
439-497. Born in Pavia in Italy, he became bishop there in 467. During his episcopate Odoacer destroyed Pavia and Epiphanius was largely responsible for rebuilding the city. While paying the ransom of some of his flock, he caught a fever of which he died.

Fructuosus, Augurius and Eulogius Jan 21 
+ 259. Fructuosus, Bishop of Tarragoña in Spain, and his two deacons, Augurius and Eulogius, were burnt at the stake under Valerian. When the fire had burnt through their bonds, they stretched out their arms in the form of a cross and died.

Lawdog Jan 21 
6th cent. Four churches are dedicated to him near St David’s in Wales.

Maccallin (Macallan) Jan 21 
+ 978. Born in Ireland, he went to St Fursey’s shrine in Péronne in France and entered the monastery of Gorze. Later he became a hermit and then Abbot of St Michael’s monastery at Thiérache and Waulsort near Dinant in Belgium.

Meinrad Jan 21 
+ 861. Of the noble family of Hohenzollern, he became a monk at the monastery of Reichenau on the Rhine in Germany. Later he became a hermit in Switzerland, and this later became the monastery of Einsiedeln, meaning in German ‘the Hermitage’. He lived as a hermit for twenty-five years, was murdered by robbers and is venerated as a martyr.

Patroclus Jan 21 
+ c 275 (or 259). A very wealthy and exceedingly charitable Orthodox in Troyes in France, who was martyred there. His relics were translated to Soest in Germany in 960.

Publius Jan 21 
+ c 112. Tradition identifies this saint with Publius, ‘chief man of the island of Malta’, who befriended St Paul after his shipwreck (Acts 28,7). He became the first Bishop of Malta and later Bishop of Athens, being martyred under Trajan.

Vimin (Wynnin, Gwynnin) Jan 21 
6th cent. A bishop in Scotland, said to have founded the monastery of Holywood.

January 22

Blaesilla Jan 22 
+ 383. A daughter of St Paula, married and widowed very young she consecrated herself to God, but died in Rome aged twenty.

Brithwald Jan 22 
+ 1045. A monk at Glastonbury, he became Bishop of Ramsbury in 1005. He was a great benefactor of Malmesbury and Glastonbury, where he was buried.

Dominic of Sora Jan 22 
+ 1031. Born in Foligno in Italy, he became a monk and founded several monasteries – at Scandrilia, Sora, Sangro, and elsewhere near Naples. He died in Sora in Campania at the age of eighty.

Gaudentius of Novara Jan 22 
+ 417. A priest in Ivrea near Turin in Italy. He succeeded St Laurence as Bishop of Novara, where he was bishop for twenty years.

Vincent of Digne Jan 22 
+ 380. Born in North Africa, he succeeded St Domninus as Bishop of Digne in France and is the main patron-saint of the town.

Vincent the Deacon Jan 22 
+ 304. Born in Huesca in Spain, he became deacon of St Valerius in Saragossa and was martyred in Valencia under Diocletian. He has always been widely honoured. In some places he is honoured as the patron of vinedressers.

Vincent, Orontius and Victor Jan 22 
+ 305. Vincent and Orontius were brothers born in Cimiez near Nice in France. They preached the Gospel in the Spanish Pyrenees and were martyred with St Victor at Puigeerda near Gerona in Spain. Their relics were later taken to Embrun in France.

January 23

Amasius Jan 23 
+ 356. A Greek, driven from the East by the Arians, he became second Bishop of Teano in central Italy in 346.

Barnard Jan 23 
777-841. Born near Lyons in France, he restored the monastery of Ambournay where he became a monk and abbot. In 810 he was consecrated Bishop of Vienne and became one of the most influential bishops of his age. He founded the monastery of Romans (c 837) where he was buried.

Colman of Lismore Jan 23 
+ c 702. Abbot of Lismore in Ireland and also a bishop.

Emerentiana Jan 23 
+ 305? A martyr in Rome. Still only a catechumen, this foster-sister of St Agnes was found by pagans praying at the tomb of the recently martyred Agnes and was stoned to death.

Ildephonsus Jan 23 
607-667. Nephew of St Eugene of Toledo in Spain. He knew St Isidore of Seville and became a monk and Abbot of Agli on the Tagus near Toledo. He became Archbishop there in 657. He excelled as a writer, especially on the Mother of God.

Lufthild Jan 23 
+ ? 850. A saint honoured near Cologne in Germany, where she lived as an anchoress.

Maimbod Jan 23 
+ c 880. Born in Ireland, he was martyred by pagans while preaching to peasants near Kaltenbrunn in Alsace, now in France.

Martyrius (Martory) Jan 23 
6th cent. A hermit in the Abruzzi in Italy.

Ormond (Armand) Jan 23 
6th cent. Monk of the monastery of Saint Mairé in France, where he became abbot.

Severian and Aquila Jan 23 
? A husband and wife martyred in Julia Caesarea in Mauritania in North Africa

January 24

Artemius (Arthemius) Jan 24 
+ 396. An imperial legate who, on his way to Spain, fell sick in Gaul and settled in Clermont in Auvergne in France where eventually he became bishop.

Bertrand (Bertram, Bertran, Ebertram) Jan 24 
7th cent. A disciple of St Bertinus, he also helped St Omer enlighten the north of France and Flanders. He later became Abbot of Saint-Quentin.

Cadoc (Docus, Cathmael, Cadvaci) Jan 24 
+ c 580. Founder of the monastery of Llancarfan not far from Cardiff in Wales, he later lived as a hermit on an island off the coast of Vannes in Brittany. He returned to Britain and by tradition was martyred by heathen near Weedon in England.

Erembert I Jan 24 
+ c 1050. Abbot of Kremsmünster in Austria.

Exuperantius Jan 24 
5th cent. Born in North Africa, he became Bishop of Cingoli near Ancona in Italy.

Felician Jan 24 and Oct 20 
+ 251. Born in Foligno in Italy, he was consecrated bishop and cared for his diocese for over fifty years, enlightening the whole of Umbria. He was arrested under Decius and died on his way to martyrdom in Rome.

Guasacht Jan 24 
5th cent. Son of Maelchu, the master under whom St Patrick worked as a slave in Ireland. Guasacht was converted by Patrick, whom he helped as Bishop of Granard in Ireland.

Suranus Jan 24 
+ c 580. Abbot of a monastery at Sora near Caserta in Italy, who gave away all the goods of the monastery to refugees from the Lombards. When the latter arrived and found that nothing remained to plunder, they martyred Suranus on the spot.

Zama Jan 24 
+ c 268. The first Bishop of Bologna in Italy.

January 25

Amarinus Jan 25 
+ 676. Abbot of a monastery in the Vosges in France and companion in martyrdom of St Praejectus (St Priest), Bishop of Clermont. The valley of Saint-Amarian in Alsace is named after him.

Artemas Jan 25 
? A child martyr in Pozzuoli (Puteoli) in Italy.

Dwynwen Jan 25 
+ c 460. Born in Wales, churches dedicated to her are to be found in Wales and Cornwall. Her holy well and shrine at Llanddwyn in Anglesey were once centres of pilgrimage.

Eochod Jan 25 
+ 597. One of St Columba’s twelve companions, he was chosen to enlighten the Picts in Scotland. He is called the Apostle of the Picts of Galloway.

Felicity Nov 23 (In the East Jan 25) 
?. A widow martyred with her sons either in Rome or else in North Africa under Decius. They were buried in Rome.

Maurus and Placid Jan 25 
? Maurus and Placid were early disciples of St Benedict, details of whose lives are related in the second book of The Dialogues of St Gregory the Great.

Poppo Jan 25 
978-1048. Born in Flanders, after a military career he made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and Rome. On his return he became a monk at St Thierry in Rheims in 1006. Two years later he moved to Saint-Vannes and then to Vaast in Arras. In 1021 he became Abbot of Stavelot-Malmédy in Belgium and the monastic revival soon spread to other monasteries, among others to Hautmont, Marchiennes, St Maximinus of Trier in Germany and St Vaast in Arras in France.

Praejectus (Priest, Prest, Preils, Prix) Jan 25 
+ 676. He became Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne in France. He encouraged monasticism but was murdered by evildoers at Volvic in the Vosges.

Racho (Ragnobert) Jan 25 
+ c 660. Bishop of Autun in France.

Seven Brothers July 10 (In the East Jan 25) 
+ c 150. Seven early martyrs in Rome who became brothers through sharing martyrdom. Their names are: Januarius, Felix and Philip, scourged to death; Sylvanus, thrown over a precipice; Alexander, Vitalis and Martial, beheaded. They suffered in Rome under Antoninus Pius.

Sigebert Jan 25 
+ 634. The first Christian King of East Anglia in England. He introduced Orthodoxy into his kingdom, later himself becoming a monk. He was killed by the pagan King Penda of Mercia and was venerated as a martyr.

Thorgyth (Tortgith) Jan 25 
+ c 700. Nun at the convent of Barking in England with St Ethelburgh. She is described as a miracle of patience under suffering.

January 26

Alphonsus of Astorga Jan 26 
9th cent. Bishop of Astorga in Spain, he went to live as a simple monk at the monastery of St Stephen de Ribas de Sil in Spanish Galicia.

Ansurius (Aduri, Asurius, Isauri) Jan 26 
+ 925. Bishop of Orense in Galicia, he helped found the monastery of Ribas de Sil in Spain. He became bishop in 915, but in 922 became a simple monk at the monastery. After his repose he was venerated there, together with seven other bishops who had followed his example.

Athanasius Jan 26 
? He is honoured as a bishop in Sorrento in the south of Italy.

Conan Jan 26 
+ ? c 648. Born in Ireland, he became a monk at Iona and a bishop in the Isle of Man.

Paula Jan 26 
347-404. A Roman lady of noble birth, she married a patrician and had five children, among them St Eustochium and St Blaesilla. Left a widow when she was thirty-two, she presided for twenty years over the sisterhood she had founded in Bethlehem. She also established a guest house for pilgrims there.

Theofrid (Theofroy) Jan 26 
+ c 690. A monk at Luxeuil in France who became Abbot of Corbie and a bishop.

January 27

Avitus Jan 27 
? St Avitus is venerated in the Canary Islands as their Apostle and first Bishop.

Candida Jan 27 
+ c 798. Mother of St Emerius, who founded the monastery of St Stephen of Bañoles in Spain. She reposed as an anchoress near the monastery.

Datius, Reatrus (Restius) and Companions, and Datius (Dativus), Julian, Vincent and 27 Companions Jan 27 
c. 500? Two groups of martyrs in North Africa; the second group suffered under the Arian Vandals.

Devota Jan 27 
+ 303. A virgin-martyr in Corsica who expired on the rack in the persecution of Diocletian. Her relics are in Monaco. She is the patron-saint of both Corsica and Monaco.

Emerius Jan 27 
8th cent. Born in France, he founded and was the first Abbot of St Stephen of Bañoles in Catalonia in Spain.

Gamelbert Jan 27 
720-800. The son of rich parents in Bavaria, Gamelbert went to Rome on pilgrimage, was ordained priest and was parish priest of Michaelsbuch in Germany for over fifty years.

Julian of Le Mans Jan 27 (In the East July 13) 
? 3rd cent. Venerated as the first Bishop of Le Mans in France.

Julian of Sora Jan 27 
+ c 150. Born in Dalmatia, he was arrested, tortured and beheaded in Sora in Campania in Italy under Antoninus Pius (138-161).

Lupus of Châlons Jan 27 
+ c 610. Bishop of Châlons-sur-Saône in France, famous for his charity to the afflicted.

Maurus (Marius, May) Jan 27 
+ c 555. Founder of a monastery in Bodon in France.

Natalis Jan 27 
6th cent. A monastic founder in the north of Ireland, he worked with St Columba. He was Abbot of Cill, Naile and Daunhinis. His holy well still exists.

Theodoric II of Orleans Jan 27 
+ 1022. A monk at Saint-Pierre-le-Vif in Sens in France, he became Bishop of Orleans.

Vitalian Jan 27 (In the East July 23) 
+ 672. Pope of Rome from 657 to 672. He was much troubled by Monothelitism. He consecrated Theodore of Tarsus as Archbishop of Canterbury in 668.

January 28

Antimus Jan 28 
8th cent. One of the first Abbots of Brantôme in France.

Brigid and Maura Jan 28 
? Born in Scotland, they were martyred in Picardy in France while on pilgrimage to Rome.

Cannera (Cainder, Kinnera) Jan 28 
+ c 530. A holy virgin who lived as an anchoress near Bantry in Ireland. She reposed after visiting St Senan and receiving communion. She was buried on St Senan’s island off Enniscorthy.

Flavian Jan 28 
+ c 304. A deputy-prefect of Rome who was martyred in Civita Vecchia in Italy under Diocletian.

Glastian Jan 28 
+ 830. The patron saint of Kinglassie in Fife in Scotland. He made peace between the Picts and the Scots.

John of Reomay (Réomé) Jan 28 
425-539. Born in Dijon in France, he became a hermit in Reomay. When disciples gathered around him, he fled and became a monk at Lérins. Here he learnt the traditions of St Macarius and on his return to Reomay, he and the monastery he founded there lived according to them.

Odo of Beauvais Jan 28 
801-880. Born near Beauvais in France, he gave up a military career to become a monk at Corbie. In 861 he became a very influential Bishop of Beauvais.

Valerius Jan 28 
+ 315. Bishop of Saragossa in Spain, with whom St Vincent served as deacon. He was arrested and exiled under Diocletian but survived and reposed in peace in his city.

January 29

Aquilinus Jan 29 
+ 650. Born in Bavaria, he fled from the prospect of the episcopate in Cologne, went to Paris and then Milan, preaching against Arianism. He was martyred for this by the Arians. His relics were venerated in Milan in Italy.

Blath (Flora) Jan 29 
+ 523. A cook at St Brigid’s convent in Kildare where she was honoured as a holy woman.

Caesarius Jan 29 
1st cent. A deacon in Angouleme in France under its first bishop St Ausonius.

Constantius and Companions Jan 29 
+ 170. Constantius, first Bishop of Perugia in Italy, was martyred with numerous members of his flock under Marcus Aurelius.

Dallan Forgaill (of Cluain Dallain) Jan 29 
+ 598. A relative of St Aidan of Ferns, he was born in Connaught in Ireland. He was martyred at Inis-coel by pirates.

Gildas the Wise Jan 29 
+ c 570. Born in the year the Britons defeated the Saxons at Bath, he was a disciple of St Illtyd. Towards the end of his life, he went to Brittany and lived as a hermit on the island of Rhuys. St Gildas is famous for a work on the sufferings of his homeland, De excidiis Britanniae.

Papias and Maurus Jan 29 
+ c 303. Soldiers martyred in Rome under Maximian.

Sabinian (Savinien) Jan 29 
+ ? 275. A martyr honoured in Troyes in France, having suffered there in one of the early persecutions, perhaps under Aurelian. Tradition relates that he came from Samos in Greece from where he had fled with his sister St Sabina.

Sulpicius (I) Jan 29 
+ 591. Bishop of Bourges in France from 584 to 591.

Valerius Jan 29 
+ c 320. Second Bishop of Trier in Germany.

Voloc Jan 29 
+ c 724. A bishop from Ireland who worked in Scotland.

January 30

Aldegund Jan 30 
630-684. Sister of St Waldetrudis, Abbess of Mons in Belgium. She founded the convent of Maubeuge in the north of France.

Amnichad (Amnuchad) Jan 30 
+ 1043. Born either in Ireland or in Scotland, he travelled to Germany and became a monk and then a hermit at Fulda.

Armentarius Jan 30 
+ c 451. First Bishop of Antibes in Provence in France. An old church is dedicated to him in Draguignan.

Armentarius Jan 30 
+ c 711. Bishop of Pavia in Italy.

Bathildis Jan 30 
+ 680. Born in England, she was sold as a slave to the mayor of the palace of the Kingdom of Neustria. In 649 King Clovis II married her and she became the mother of three future kings. After her husband’s death, she was regent of France (656-664). When Clotaire III came of age, she became a nun at the convent of Chelles which she had founded.

Felician, Philappian and Companions Jan 30 
? A group of one hundred and twenty-six martyrs in North Africa.

Martina Jan 30 
+ 228. A martyr in Rome under Alexander Severus.

Savina (Sabina) Jan 30 
+ 311. Born in Milan in Italy, she ministered to martyrs in prison and buried their bodies during the persecution of Diocletian

Tudy (Tudclyd, Tybie) Jan 30 
5th century? A virgin in Wales. Llandydie church in Dyfed is named after her.

January 31

Adamnan Jan 31 
+ c 680. Born in Ireland, he became a monk at Coldingham, now in Scotland.

Aidan (Maedoc) Jan 31 
+ 626. The first Bishop of Ferns in Co. Wexford in Ireland where he also founded and became abbot of a monastery. In his youth he had become a monk under St David in Wales and later in life he returned to live there.

Athanasius Jan 31 
+ c 885. Born in Catania in Sicily, during the invasion of the Saracens he fled to Patras in Greece, where he became a monk and eventually a bishop.

Bobinus Jan 31 
+ c 766. Born in Aquitaine in France, he was a monk at Moutier-la-Celle. Later he became Bishop of Troyes (760).

Eusebius Jan 31 
+ 884. Born in Ireland, he became a monk at St Gall in Switzerland and later lived as a hermit on Mt St Victor in the Vorarlberg. While denouncing godlessness, he was struck with a scythe and killed. As a result he was venerated as a martyr.

Geminian of Modena Jan 31 
+ 348. Deacon and later successor of the Bishop of Modena. He gave refuge to St Athanasius the Great when he came through Italy on his way to exile in Gaul. Geminian bravely opposed Jovinianism.

John Angelus Jan 31 
+ c 1050. Born in Venice in Italy, he became a monk at Pomposa.

Julius of Novara Jan 31 
+ c 390. Julius was a priest and his brother Julian a deacon. Together they converted heathen temples into Christian churches.

Madoes (Madianus) Jan 31 
? A saint who has left his name to a place in the Carse of Gowrie in Scotland.

Marcella Jan 31 
325-410. A noblewoman of Rome, as a widow she turned her home into a house-church and she devoted herself to prayer and almsgiving. When Alaric sacked Rome, Marcella was cruelly scourged as the Goths thought that she had hidden her wealth. In reality she had already distributed it to the poor. She died shortly after from the effects of this treatment.

Ulphia (Wulfia, Olfe, Wulfe) Jan 31 
8th cent. By tradition she lived as a hermitess near Amiens in France, her spiritual father being the hermit St Domitius. A convent was later built on the site of her tomb.

Wilgils Jan 31 
7th cent. Father of St Willibrord, born in Northumbria in England, he settled on the banks of the River Humber and lived as a hermit.

Advertisements

FEBRUARY 1-28

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

pismo-beach

ORTHODOX SAINTS OF WESTERN EUROPE

 FEBRUARY

Source:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/hp.php

ORTHODOX ENGLAND

February 1

Brigid (Bridget, Bride) Feb 1
c 450-c 525. Born in Faughart near Dundalk, she became a nun when still young and founded a convent in Kildare, the first in Ireland. Her life is associated with mercy and pity for the poor. A greatly venerated saint, she is the second patron-saint of Ireland after St Patrick.

Brigid Feb 1
9th cent. Sister of St Andrew, Abbot of St Donatus in Fiesole in Tuscany in Italy. She was carried to her brother’s deathbed by angels and reposed as an anchoress in the Apennines.

Cinnia Feb 1
5th cent. A princess of Ulster in Ireland who was converted by St Patrick and became a nun.

Clarus Feb 1
+ c 1048. An ascetic and hermit in Seligenstadt near Mainz in Germany.

Crewenna Feb 1
5th cent. Born in Ireland, he went to Cornwall where the place name Crowan recalls him.

Darlugdach (Dardulacha, Derlugdach) Feb 1
+ c 524. Successor of St Brigid as second Abbess of Kildare in Ireland.

Jarlath (Hierlath) Feb 1
+ c 480. A disciple of St Patrick, he succeeded St Benignus as Bishop of Armagh in Ireland.

Kinnia Feb 1
5th cent. A virgin baptised by St Patrick and venerated in Co. Louth in Ireland.

Paul of Trois-Châteaux Feb 1
+ c 405. Born in Rheims in France, he became a hermit near Arles and was chosen Bishop of Trois-Châteaux in the Dauphiné

Perpetua, Felicity, Saturus (Satyrus), Saturninus, Revocatus and Secundulus March 7 (in the East Feb 1)
+ 203. Vivia Perpetua was a young married woman of good social position. Felicity, also married, was a slave. The others were catechumens and Saturus perhaps their instructor. All were imprisoned together in Carthage in North Africa as a law of Septimus Severus forbade conversions to the faith. Secundulus died in prison: the others were thrown to the wild beasts in the amphitheatre on March 7. Their Acts were written by Saturus, one of the martyrs, and completed by an eyewitness.

Seiriol Feb 1
6th cent. A saint whose name is recalled by the island of Ynys-Seiriol (Puffin Island) off Anglesey in Wales where remains of his small monastery still exist.

Severus Feb 1
+ c 348. Born in Ravenna in Italy, he became bishop of that city in 283 and attended the Council of Sardica in 344.

Severus Feb 1
+ c 690. Born of poor parents in the Cotentin in the north of France, he became Abbot and Bishop of Avranches. Before his repose he returned to monastic life.

Sigebert Feb 1
631-656. Sigebert III was King of Austrasia, now eastern France. He lived piously but reposed at the age of twenty-five. He was revered as the founder of numerous hospitals, churches and monasteries, among them Stavelot and Malmédy in Belgium.

Ursus Feb 1
6th cent. Born in Ireland, he preached against Arianism in the south of France and later went to Aosta in Italy.

February 2

Adalbald Feb 2
+ 652. Born in Flanders in Belgium, he was a son or grandson of St Gertrude of Hamage. He married a lady named Rictrude, who is also venerated as a saint together with their four children, Maurontius, Clotsindis, Eusebia and Adalsindis. Adalbald was murdered by relatives of his wife who disapproved of the marriage and he was venerated as a martyr.

Adeloga (Hadeloga) Feb 2
+ c 745. A princess who became the first Abbess of Kitzingen in Germany.

Apronian Feb 2
+ c 304. A Roman executioner who was converted to Orthodoxy when taking the martyr St Sisinnius before the tribunal and was then himself martyred.

Columbanus Feb 2
+ 959. Born in Ireland, he lived as a hermit near the church of Saint-Bavo in Ghent in Belgium.

Ebsdorf (Martyrs of) Feb 2
+ 880. In 880 a Christian army was caught in the ice and snow and was defeated by pagan Norsemen at Ebsdorf in the north of Germany. Among them, St Bruno and four bishops, eleven nobles and many others were slain and venerated as martyrs.

Feock Feb 2
? A saint recalled by a church dedication in Cornwall.

Flosculus (Flou) Feb 2
+ c 480. Bishop of Orleans in France.

Laurence of Canterbury Feb 2
+ 619. Sent by St Gregory the Great to England, St Augustine sent him back to Rome to report on the English mission and to bring more help. The second Archbishop of Canterbury from 604, he suffered during the pagan reaction and thought of fleeing to France. He was rebuked by the Apostle Peter in a dream and in the end succeeded in converting Eadbald.

Marquard Feb 2
+ 880. A monk at New Corbey in Saxony, he was Bishop of Hildesheim from 874 to 880 and was martyred with others at Ebsdorf in Germany.

Theodoric Feb 2
+ 880. Third Bishop of Ninden in Germany.

February 3

Anatolius Feb 3
9th cent. A bishop in Scotland, he went to Rome on pilgrimage and settled as a hermit in Salins in the Jura in France, where at a later date a church was dedicated to him.

Ansgar (Anschar) Feb 3
801-865. Born near Amiens in France, as a child he became a monk at Old Corbie in Picardy. He then went to New Corbie in Saxony, from where he was taken by King Harold of Denmark to enlighten the heathen Danes. He toiled there as Archbishop of Hamburg for thirteen years and his mission extended to Sweden, Norway and the north of Germany.

Berlinda (Berlindis, Bellaude) Feb 3
+ 702. A niece of St Amandus, she became a nun at Moorsel near Alost in Belgium and later an anchoress in Meerbeke.

Caellainn (Caoilfionn) Feb 3
? 6th cent. A church in Roscommon in Ireland is dedicated to her.

Celerinus Feb 3
+ c 250. Born in North Africa, he earned the title of martyr on account of the sufferings he endured under Decius during a visit to Rome. Freed, he returned to Carthage, where he was ordained deacon and later a church was dedicated to him.

Deodatus Feb 3
8th cent. A monk at Lagny in France.

Felix, Symphronius (Sempronius), Hippolytus and Companions Feb 3
? A group of martyrs in North Africa.

Hadelin Feb 3
+ c 690. Born in Gascony in France, he followed St Remaclus to Solignac, Maastricht and Stavelot and founded the monastery of Chelles, also in Belgium. He lived as a hermit near Dinant on the Meuse.

Ia (Hia, Ives) Feb 3
+ 450. Born in Ireland and the sister of St Ercus, she went to Cornwall with Sts Fingar, Piala and others and was martyred at the mouth of the River Hayle. The town of St Ives is called after her.

Laurence the Illuminator Feb 3
+ 576. A Syrian driven by the Monophysite persecution to Italy, there he was ordained and founded a monastery near Spoleto. He was bishop for twenty years, but then founded the monastery of Farfa in the Sabine hills near Rome. St Laurence was renowned as a peacemaker. His title derives from his gift of healing blindness, both spiritual and physical.

Laurentinus, Ignatius and Celerina Feb 3
3rd cent. Martyrs in North Africa. Sts Laurentinus and Ignatius were uncles and St Celerina was an aunt of the deacon St Celerinus.

Liafdag Feb 3
c 980. He became Bishop in Jutland in Denmark and met the needs of the growing number of Orthodox there but was martyred by pagans.

Lupicinus and Felix Feb 3
5th cent. Bishops of Lyons in France.

Oliver (Oliverius, Liberius) Feb 3
+ c 1050. A monk at Santa Maria di Portonuovo in Ancona in Italy.

Philip of Vienne Feb 3
+ c 578. Bishop of Vienne in France (c 560-578).

Remedius Feb 3
? Bishop of Gap in France.

Tigides and Remedius Feb 3
6th century? Two bishops who succeeded one another in Gap in France.

Werburgh Feb 3
+ c 699. Daughter of St Ermenhild and King Wulfhere of Mercia. She became a nun at Ely under St Etheldred (Audrey) and later founded three convents. She reposed at Trentham but her body was transferred to Chester, of which she is the patron saint.

Werburgh Feb 3
+ c 785. A widow who became a nun, probably at Bardney in England, where she later became abbess.

February 4

Aldate Feb 4
6th cent? Famed for his resistance to the heathen invaders of Britain, in some accounts he is called Bishop of Gloucester, now in England.

Aquilinus, Geminus, Gelasius, Magnus and Donatus Feb 4
3rd cent. Martyrs in ‘Forum Sempronii’, which has been interpreted as Fossombrone in central Italy.

Aventinus of Chartres Feb 4
+ c 520. Bishop of Chartres in France, he succeeded his brother, St Solemnis.

Aventinus of Troyes Feb 4
+ c 538. Born in central France, he acted as almoner to St Lupus, Bishop of Troyes, until he left to live as a hermit. The place where he lived is now called Saint-Aventin.

Eutychius Feb 4
4th cent. A martyr in Rome under Diocletian. He was left in prison for twelve days without food and then thrown into a well.

Liephard Feb 4
+ 690? According to tradition he was born in England and was a bishop and companion of King Cadwalla during the latter’s pilgrimage to Rome. While returning to England, Liephard was murdered near Cambrai in France.

Modan Feb 4
? 6th cent. Born in Ireland, he preached at Stirling and along the Forth in Scotland and later lived as a hermit near Dumbarton.

Nithard Feb 4
+ 845. A monk at Corbie in Saxony in Germany and a companion of St Ansgar whom he followed to Sweden as a missionary. He was martyred there by pagan Swedes.

Rembert Feb 4
+ 888. Born in Flanders, he became a monk at Turholt in Belgium He worked in Denmark with St Anschar and succeeded him as Bishop of Hamburg-Bremen (865).

Vincent of Troyes Feb 4
+ c 546. Bishop of Troyes in France c 536-546.

Vulgis Feb 4
+ c 760. Bishop and Abbot of Lobbes in Belgium.

February 5

Adelaide Feb 5
+ c 1015. Abbess of Willich near Bonn in Germany and of Our Lady of the Capitol in Cologne. Both convents were founded by her father.

Agatha Feb 5
+ 1024. Wife of the Count of Carinthia in Austria, she was a model of devotion and patience under the brutal ill-treatment of her jealous husband whom she later converted.

Agatha Feb 5
? Born in Catania in Sicily, where she was martyred. She was handed over to a prostitute and her breasts were cut off. The Apostle Peter healed her of this mutilation while she was in prison, where she subsequently reposed. The miracles by which she has preserved Catania from successive eruptions of Mt Etna are well accredited.

Agricola Feb 5
+ 420. The eleventh Bishop of Tongres in Belgium.

Avitus of Vienne Feb 5
+ c 520. Born in Auvergne in France, he was the brother of St Apollinaris, Bishop of Valence. Their father St Isychius, a Roman senator, had also been Bishop of Vienne. Avitus succeeded him. As a bishop he commanded the respect of his flock, both of the pagan Franks and the Arian Burgundians. He converted the Burgundian King, Sigismund. St Avitus was also a fine writer.

Bertulf Feb 5
+ 705. Born in Pannonia, he moved to Flanders in Belgium where he became Orthodox and a priest and founded a monastery.

Genuinus (Ingenuinus) and Albinus Feb 5
7th cent. A Bishop of Sabion near Brixen in the Tyrol in Austria. He is commemorated with St Albinus, Bishop of Brixen in the 11th century.

Indract Feb 5
+ c 710. Born in Ireland, on his return from a pilgrimage to Rome he was murdered by heathen with his sister St Dominica (Drusa) and others near Glastonbury in England. Their relics were enshrined there.

Modestus Feb 5
+ c 722. A monk in Salzburg, he became Bishop of Carinthia in Austria and was largely responsible for its enlightenment.

Vodoaldus (Voel, Vodalus, Vodalis) Feb 5
+ c 725. Born in Ireland, he went to France and reposed as a hermit near Soissons.

February 6

Amandus of Elnon Feb 6
c 675. Born near Nantes in France, he lived as a hermit in Bourges for fifteen years. At the age of thirty-three he became a bishop and preached in Flanders in Belgium, Carinthia in Austria and among the Basques in Spain. He founded many monasteries in all these places, of which the best known is Elnon near Tournai, where he went in his old age and reposed aged over ninety.

Andrew of Elnon Feb 6
+ c 690. A monk and disciple of St Amandus at Elnon in France, whom he succeeded as Abbot. His relics were enshrined together with those of St Amandus in 694.

Antholian (Anatolianus) Feb 6
c 265. Mentioned by St Gregory of Tours as one of the martyrs of Auvergne in France under Valerian and Gallienus. Fellow-sufferers were Sts Cassius, Maximus, Liminius and Victorinus.

Mel (Melchno) Feb 6
+ c 490. By tradition one of the four nephews of St Patrick ( Mel, Melchu, Munis and Rioch), sons of Conis and Darerca, St Patrick’s sister. They accompanied St Patrick to Ireland, St Mel becoming the first Bishop of Ardagh.

Mun Feb 6
5th cent. A nephew of St Patrick who consecrated him bishop. He ended his days as a hermit on an island in Lough Ree in Ireland.

Relindis (Renildis, Renula, Renule) Feb 6
+ c 750. A nun together with her sister Herlindis in Valenciennes, she was gifted in embroidery and painting. On her sister’s repose, she became Abbess of Maaseik in Belgium.

Tanco (Tancho, Tatta) Feb 6
+ 808. Born in Ireland, he became Abbot of Amalbarich in Saxony and eventually Bishop of Werden in Germany. He was martyred by pagans whose savage customs he had denounced.

Vedast (Vaast, Vaat, Gaston, Foster) Feb 6
+ 539. He preached with St Remigius to convert the Franks. He was Bishop of Arras-Cambrai in the north of France for nearly forty years. He instructed King Clovis for baptism, built churches and cared for the poor.

February 7

Amulwinus Feb 7
+ c 750. Bishop of Lobbes in Belgium and the successor of St Erminus (+ 737).

Anatolius Feb 7
? Bishop of Cahors in France.

Augulus (Augurius, Aule) Feb 7
+ c 303. An early martyr and bishop, probably in France, though some have suggested London in England.

Chrysolius Feb 7
4th cent. An Armenian who enlightened the north-east of France, where he became bishop and was martyred. Having left Armenia during the persecution of Diocletian, he won martyrdom in Flanders. His relics were venerated in Bruges in Belgium.

Fidelis Feb 7
+ c 570. Eastern by origin, he travelled to Spain with some merchants and settled in Mérida, where he became a disciple of St Paul, bishop of the city, whom he later succeeded.

Juliana of Bologna Feb 7
+ 435. A matron in Bologna in Italy whose piety and charity were praised by St Ambrose of Milan. Her husband left her to become a priest with her consent and she devoted herself to bringing up her four children and to the service of the Church and the poor.

Laurence of Siponto Feb 7
+ c 546. Called Majoranus. Bishop of Siponto in Italy from 492, he built the church of St Michael on Mt Gargano.

Meldon (Medon) Feb 7
6th cent. From Ireland, he became a hermit in France and reposed at Péronne.

Richard Feb 7
+ 720. An noble from the west of England and father of Sts Willibald, Winebald and Walburga. He reposed at Lucca on a pilgrimage to Rome.

Tressan (Trésain) Feb 7
+ 550. A missionary from Ireland, he was ordained priest by St Remigius and preached in Mareuil on the Marne in France.

February 8

Cuthman Feb 8
9th cent. A confessor who lived a holy life as a shepherd near Steyning in Sussex in England. The church there was dedicated to him.

Elfleda (Aelflaed) Feb 8
+ 714. Daughter of Oswy, King of Northumbria in England. She was offered to God as a child at the convent of Hartlepool. She then went to Whitby with St Hilda and succeeded her mother Enfleda as abbess there. She was one of the most influential people of her time.

Honoratus of Milan Feb 8
+ 570. Appointed Bishop of Milan in Italy in 567, at a time when much trouble was caused by Arianism and the Lombard invasion. He was driven out of Milan by barbarians

Jacut and Guethenoc Feb 8
5th cent. Sons of Sts Fragan and Gwen and brothers of St Gwenaloe. They became disciples of St Budoc and were driven from Britain to Brittany.

Juventius of Pavia Feb 8 and Sept 12
1st cent. (?). The tradition is that St Hermagoras, Bishop of Aquileia and disciple of the Apostle Mark, sent Sts Syrus and Juventius to preach the Gospel in Pavia in Italy where the latter became the first bishop.

Kigwe (Kewe, Ciwa) Feb 8
6th or 7th cent. A saint venerated in Gwent in Wales.

Mary (Mileda, Mlada) Feb 8
+ 994. Daughter of Boleslav, Duke of Czechia. She founded the convent of St George in Prague.

Meingold Feb 8
10th cent. A holy man, Meingold lived in Huy on the Meuse and was venerated in Belgium

Nicetius (Nizier) of Besançon Feb 8
+ 611. Bishop of Besançon in France and a friend of St Columbanus of Luxeuil. He restored the episcopal see to Besançon after it had been transferred to Nyon on Lake Geneva after the invasion of the Huns.

Oncho (Onchuo) Feb 8
+ c 600. A pilgrim, poet, and guardian of holy relics and the Celtic tradition. While searching for memorials of the saints, he reposed at Clonmore monastery in Ireland and his body was enshrined there together with the relics which he had gathered.

Paul of Verdun Feb 8
+ c 649. A courtier who became a hermit on Mt Voge (now Paulberg) near Trier in Germany. Later he became a monk at the monastery of Tholey and then Bishop of Verdun in France.

Paul, Lucius and Cyriacus Feb 8
? Martyrs in Rome.

February 9

Alexander Feb 9
A martyr of Rome who was accompanied in his confession and death by thirty-eight others.

Alto Feb 9
+ c 760. Born in Ireland, he went to Germany and settled as a hermit in a forest near Augsburg. There he founded a monastery, now called Altomünster after him.

Ammon, Emilian, Lassa and Companions Feb 9
? A group of forty-four Christians martyred in Membressa in Africa.

Anshert Feb 9
+ c 700. From being Chancellor at the Court of Clotaire III he became a monk at Fontenelle in the north of France. He was chosen third abbot and in 683 became Bishop of Rouen.

Cronan the Wise Feb 9
? 8th cent. Called ‘the Wise’ on account of his knowledge of the canons.

Cuaran (Curvinus, Cronan) Feb 9
+ c 700. A bishop in Ireland, called ‘the Wise’, who hid his identity in order to become a monk at Iona, where he was recognised by St Columba.

Eingan (Einion, Eneon, Anianus) Feb 9
6th cent. A British prince who left Cumberland for Wales, he finished his days as a hermit at Llanengan near Bangor.

Nebridius Feb 9
+ c 527. Bishop of Egara near Barcelona in Spain, a city since destroyed.

Primus and Donatus Feb 9
+ 362. Two deacons in Lavallum in North Africa martyred by Donatists.

Sabinus Feb 9
+ c 566. Bishop of Canosa in Apulia in Italy and a friend of St Benedict. He was entrusted with an embassy (535-536) to the Emperor Justinian. He is the patron saint of Bari where his relics are now enshrined.

Teio (Teilio, Teilus, Thelian, Teilan, Teiou, Teliou, Dillo, Dillon) Feb 9
6th cent. Probably born in Penally near Tenby in Wales. He was a disciple of St Dyfrig and a friend of Sts David and Samson. He founded Llandaff monastery (Landeio Fawr) in Dyfed where he was buried.

February 10

Austreberta Feb 10
630-704. Born near Thérouanne in Artois in the north of France, she was the daughter of St Framechildis and Count Badefrid. She became a nun with St Omer in Abbeville where she became Abbess. She was also blessed as Abbess of Pavilly.

Baldegundis Feb 10
+ c 580. Abbess of Saint-Croix in Poitiers in France.

Desideratus (Désiré) Feb 10 Feb 11
6th cent. Successor of St Avitus as Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne in France

Erluph Feb 10
+ 830. Probably born in Ireland, he became Bishop of Werden in Germany and was martyred by pagans.

Merewenna Feb 10
+ c 970. Abbess of Romsey, a convent in Hampshire in the south of England.

Prothadius (Protagius) Feb 10
+ 624. The successor of St Nicetius as Bishop of Besançon in France.

Rome (Martyrs of) Feb 10
? 250. Ten soldiers martyred on the Via Lavicana in Rome.

Salvius Feb 10
+ 962. Abbot of Albelda in the north of Spain.

Scholastica Feb 10
c 480-c 543. Sister of St Benedict. She became a nun and lived near Montecassino. St Gregory in his Dialogues (2,33), says that St Benedict saw her soul ascend to heaven in the semblance of a dove.

Silvanus Feb 10
? Bishop of Terracina in Italy.

Soteris Feb 10
+ 304. A virgin-martyr in Rome under Diocletian. She seems to have been related to St Ambrose who often mentioned her.

Trumwin Feb 10
+ c 704. Appointed in 681 by St Theodore and King Edfrid as Bishop of the Southern Picts in Scotland, he set up his diocese at the monastery of Abercorn on the Firth of Forth. In 685 King Egfrid was killed by the Picts and St Trumwin and all his monks had to flee. He retired to Whitby in England and lived an exemplary monastic life there.

Zoticus, Irenaeus, Hyacinth, Amantius and Companions Feb 10
+ 120. A group of ten soldiers martyred in Rome and buried on the Via Lavicana.

February 11

Africa, Martyrs of North-West Africa Feb 11
+ c 303. Martyrs known as the ‘Guardians of the Holy Scriptures’.. They preferred martyrdom to giving up the sacred books to be burnt. They suffered under Diocletian.

Benedict of Aniane Feb 11
c 750-821. A Visigoth, by name Witiza, he was born in Languedoc in France. In 773 he became a monk at Saint-Seine near Dijon and in 779 founded a monastery in Languedoc by a stream called Aniane. The Emperor asked him to oversee monasteries in Languedoc, Provence and Gascony and eventually all those in French and Germany.

Caedmon Feb 11
+ c 680. A Northumbrian, who worked at the monastery of Whitby in England as a farm-labourer. He was the first Englishman to write Orthodox hymns.

Calocerus Feb 11
+ c 130. A disciple of St Apollinaris, whom he succeeded as Bishop of Ravenna in Italy.

Desideratus (Désiré) Feb 10 Feb 11
6th cent. Successor of St Avitus as Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne in France

Desiderius Feb 11
+ 608. Born in Autun he became Bishop of Vienne in France. He defended Orthodox values and was murdered for this at the place now called Saint-Didier-sur-Chalaronne.

Gobnata (Gobnet) Feb 11
? 6th cent. Abbess of a convent in Ballyvourney in Co. Cork in Ireland. A holy well named after her still exists there.

Gregory II Feb 11
669-731. Born in Rome, he was librarian and archivist of the Roman Church, when he was chosen Pope in 715. He is famous for encouraging the spreading of the Gospel among the Germanic peoples, to whom he sent St Boniface and St Corbinian. He restored several Italian monasteries, notably Montecassino. He also opposed Iconoclasm and checked the advancing Lombards.

Lazarus of Milan Feb 11
+ c 450. Archbishop of Milan in Italy, he defended his flock from the Ostrogoths.

Priscus, Castrensis, Tammarus, Rosius, Heraclius, Secundinus, Adjutor, Mark, Augustus, Elpidius, Canion and Vindonius Sept 1 and Feb 11
5th cent? Priscus, a bishop in North Africa, and his priests were cast adrift in a boat by the Arian Vandals. They reached the south of Italy, where eventually Priscus became Bishop of Capua.

Saturninus, Dativus, Felix, Ampelius, Victoria and Companions Feb 11
+ 304. A group of forty-six martyrs in Albitina in North Africa. They were arrested at the liturgy and sent to Carthage for examination. Saturninus was a priest, and with him suffered his four children, Saturninus and Felix, readers, Mary, a virgin, and Hilarion, a young child. Dativus and another Felix were senators. Other names from this group which have come down to us are: Thelica, Ampelius, Emeritus, Rogatian and Victoria, a holy virgin of undaunted courage. The child Hilarion, when threatened by the magistrates while his companions were being tortured, replied: ‘Yes, torture me too; anyhow, I am a Christian’. They all died in prison.

Severinus Feb 11
+ ? 507. A Burgundian who became the Abbot of Agaunum in Switzerland.

February 12

Benedict Revelli Feb 12
c 900. A monk at Santa Maria dei Fonti in Italy and then a hermit on the island of Gallinaria in the Gulf of Genoa. In 870 he became Bishop of Albenga.

Damian Feb 12
? A martyr in Rome whose relics were found in the catacombs of St Callistus and sent to Salamanca in Spain.

Ethilwold Feb 12
+ c 740. A disciple of St Cuthbert, he was Abbot of Melrose in Scotland before becoming Bishop of Lindisfarne in England.

Eulalia (Aulaire, Aulazie, Olalla) of Barcelona Feb 12
+ c 304. Born in Barcelona in Spain, she was a virgin-martyr under Diocletian.

Gaudentius of Verona Feb 12
+ c 465. Bishop of Verona in Italy. His relics are enshrined in the ancient basilica of St Stephen in Verona.

Julian the Hospitaller Feb 12
? Also called ‘the Poor’. Tradition says that Julian killed his own parents in error. In repentance he and his wife went to Rome on pilgrimage and built a hospice by the side of a river where they tended the poor and the sick and rowed travellers across the river. For this reason he is venerated as the patron saint of boatmen, innkeepers and travellers.

Modestus Feb 12
+ c 304. A deacon, born in Sardinia and martyred under Diocletian. His relics were brought to Benevento in Italy in c 785.

Modestus Feb 12
2nd century? Modestus was martyred in Carthage in North Africa and venerated as the patron-saint of Cartagena in Spain.

February 13

Aimo (Aimonius) Feb 13
+ c 790. Founder of the convent of St Victor in Meda in the north of Italy.

Benignus Feb 13
+ c 303. A priest in Todi in Umbria in Italy martyred under Diocletian.

Dyfnog Feb 13
7th cent. Born in Wales, he was much venerated in Clwyd.

Ermenhild (Ermengild, Ermenilda) Feb 13
+ c 700. Daughter of King Erconbert of Kent and St Saxburgh. She married Wulfhere, the King of Mercia. On his death, she joined her mother at Minster-in-Sheppey, eventually succeeding her as abbess. She then went to Ely where she also became abbess.

Fulcran Feb 13
+ 1006. Bishop of Lodève in Languedoc in France, famous for his asceticism. He was bishop for over half a century.

Fusca and Maura Feb 13
+ c 250. Two martyrs in Ravenna under Decius. Fusca was a young girl and Maura her nurse.

Gosbert Feb 13
+ c 859. The fourth Bishop of Osnabruck in Germany and a disciple of St Ansgar.

Huna Feb 13
+ c 690. A monk-priest in Ely in England under St Audrey (Etheldred) whom he helped in her last moments. He ended his life as a hermit in the fens near Chatteris, at a place now called Honey Farm after him.

Julian of Lyons Feb 13
? A martyr venerated in Lyons in France.

Lucinus (Lezin) Feb 13
+ c 618. Bishop of Angers in France.

Modomnock (Domnoc, Dominic) Feb 13
+ c 550. A disciple of St David in Wales and later a hermit in Tibraghny in Ireland.

Stephen of Lyons Feb 13
+ 512. Bishop of Lyons in France, he was active in converting the Arian Burgundians to Orthodoxy.

Stephen of Rieti Feb 13
+ c 590. An Abbot in Rieti in Italy whom St Gregory the Great describes as ‘rude of speech but of cultured life’.

February 14

Antoninus of Sorrento /
+ 830. A monk in one of the daughter monasteries of Montecassino in Italy. Forced to leave his monastery by the wars raging in the country, he became a hermit, until he was invited by the people of Sorrento to live among them. He did so as Abbot of St Agrippinus. He is now venerated as the patron-saint of that town.

Conran Feb 14
? A holy bishop of the Orkney Islands.

Eleuchadius Feb 14
2nd cent. A Greek, he was converted by St Apollinaris of Ravenna in Italy and succeeded St Adheritus as third Bishop of that city.

Nostrianus Feb 14
+ c 450. Bishop of Naples in Italy and a valiant opponent of Arianism and Pelagianism.

Proculus, Ephebus and Apollonius Feb 14
+ 273. Martyrs in Terni in Italy.

Theodosius Feb 14
+ 554. Bishop of Vaison in France and predecessor of St Quinidius.

Valentine Feb 14
+ 269. A priest and doctor in Rome martyred probably under Claudius the Goth and buried on the Flaminian Way. In 350 a church was built over his tomb.

Valentine Feb 14
+ c 269. A Bishop of Terni in Italy martyred under Claudius the Goth.

Vitalis, Felicula and Zeno Feb 14
? Early martyrs in Rome.

February 15

Agape Feb 15
c 273. A virgin-martyr in Terni in Italy. She belonged to a group of virgins formed by St Valentine into a community.

Berach (Barachias, Berachius) Feb 15
6th cent. From his birth he was cared for by his uncle St Freoch. Afterwards he became a disciple of St Kevin and founded a monastery at Clusin-Coirpte in Connaught. He is the patron-saint of Kilbarry near Dublin in Ireland.

Craton and Companions Feb 15
+ c 273. Converted to Christ by St Valentine, Bishop of Terni. He was martyred in Rome together with his wife and family.

Decorosus Feb 15
+ 695. For thirty years Bishop of Capua in Italy.

Dochow (Dochau, Dogwyn) Feb 15
? 473. He travelled from Wales to Cornwall and founded a monastery there and may have become a bishop.

Druthmar Feb 15
+ 1046. A monk at Lorsch, in 1014 he became Abbot of Corvey in Saxony in Germany

Farannan Feb 15
+ c 590. A disciple of St Columba at Iona in Scotland. Eventually he returned to Ireland to lead the life of a hermit at All-Farannan, now Allernan, in Sligo.

Faustinus and Jovita Feb 15
2nd cent. Two brothers, belonging to the nobility of Brescia in Italy, zealous preachers of Orthodoxy, they were beheaded in their native city under Hadrian.

Faustus Feb 15
6th cent. A disciple of St Benedict at Montecassino in Italy.

Georgia Feb 15
+ c 500. A holy virgin and later anchoress near Clermont in Auvergne in France.

Quinidius Feb 15
+ c 579. After living as a hermit in Aix in Provence, he became Bishop of Vaison in France.

Saturninus, Castulus, Magnus and Lucius Feb 15
+ 273. These martyrs belonged to the flock of St Valentine, Bishop of Terni in Italy.

Severus Feb 15
+ c 530. A priest from the Abruzzi in Italy. St Gregory the Great relates that he brought a dead man back to life so that he could receive communion and unction.

Sigfrid Feb 15
+ c 1045. A priest and monk, probably at Glastonbury in England. He went to enlighten Sweden and was based in Vaxjo. One of his converts was King Olaf of Sweden.

Walfrid (Gualfredo) della Gherardesca Feb 15
+ c 765. Born in Pisa in Italy, he married and had five sons and one daughter. In later life he joined two other married men in founding the monastery of Palazzuolo and a convent nearby for their wives and Walfrid’s daughter. Walfrid was the first abbot and was succeeded by one of his sons.

Winaman, Unaman and Sunaman Feb 15
+ c 1040. Monks and nephews of St Sigfrid whom they followed to Sweden. They were martyred by pagans.

February 16

Faustinus Feb 16
+ 381. The successor of St Ursicinus about the year 360, as Bishop of Brescia in Italy. He was a descendant of Sts Faustinus and Jovita and compiled their Acts.

Honestus Feb 16
+ 270. Born in Nimes in France, he was ordained priest and sent to Spain by St Saturninus to preach the Gospel, which he did with success. He was martyred in Pampeluna.

Onesimus Feb 16
+ c 90. The slave who ran away from his master Philemon, was converted by St Paul in Rome and was the occasion of the Apostle’s letter to Philemon.

February 17

Donatus, Secundian, Romulus and Companions Feb 17
+ 304. A group of eighty-nine martyrs who suffered under Diocletian. They were martyred in Porto Gruaro, not far from Venice in Italy.

Faustinus and Companions Feb 17
? A group of forty-five martyrs honoured in Rome.

Finan Feb 17
+ 661. Born in Ireland, he became a monk at Iona in Scotland and succeeded St Aidan in the Northumbrian Church. With St Cedd and others he enlightened parts of the south of England.

Fintan Feb 17
+ 603. A disciple of St Columba, he led the life of a hermit in Clonenagh in Leix in Ireland. Soon numerous disciples attached themselves to this ascetic and he became their abbot.

Fortchern Feb 17
? 6th cent. Bishop of Trim in Ireland, he later lived as a hermit.

Guevrock (Gueroc), Kerric) Feb 17
6th cent. A Briton who followed St Tudwal to Brittany and succeeded him as Abbot of Loc-Kirec. He also helped St Paul of Léon.

Habet-Deus Feb 17
+ c 500. Bishop of Luna in Tuscany in Italy, a city now in ruins. He was probably martyred by the Arian Vandals.

Loman (Luman) Feb 17
+ c 450. A nephew of St Patrick and the first Bishop of Trim in Meath in Ireland.

Silvinus Feb 17
+ c 720. A courtier who gave up his worldly life to preach the Gospel. He enlightened the area near Thérouanne in the north of France. After some forty years of unceasing work, during which he paid the ransoms of many slaves, he went to the monastery of Auchy-les-Moines, where he lived the few remaining years of his life as a monk.

February 18

Angilbert Feb 18
c 740-814. His early life was worldly, but later he became a model Abbot of St Riquier in the north of France where there were some 300 monks.

Colman of Lindisfame Feb 18
+ 676. Born in Connaught in Ireland, he became a monk at Iona in Scotland. He was then chosen as third Abbot of Lindisfarne in England. He later returned to Ireland, founding a monastery on Innisboffin Island for Irish monks and a monastery for English monks (Mayo of the Saxons).

Ethelina (Eudelme) Feb 18
? The patroness of Little Sodbury, now in Gloucestershire in England.

Helladius of Toledo Feb 18
+ 632. Born in Toledo in Spain, he served at the court of the Visigothic Kings. He loved to visit the monastery of Agali (Agallia) near Toledo on the banks of the Tagus. Eventually he became a monk there and then abbot (605). In 615 he became Archbishop of Toledo.

Leo the Great Nov 10 (In the East Feb 18)
+ 461. Probably born in Tuscany in Italy, he became Bishop of Rome in 440. He fought against many heresies. His celebrated Tomos defined the Orthodox belief in the Two Natures and One Person of Christ. It was acclaimed as the teaching of the Orthodox Church at the Council of Chalcedon in 451. The most famous event of his life was his meeting with Attila outside the gates of Rome which resulted in the salvation of the city in 452.

Lucius, Silvanus, Rutulus, Classicus, Secundinus, Fructulus and Maximus Feb 18
? Martyrs in North Africa.

Maximus, Claudius, Praepedigna, Alexander and Cutias Feb 18
+ 295. Martyrs in Rome who suffered under Diocletian.

February 19

Barbatus (Barbas) Feb 19
c 612-682. Born in Benevento in Italy, he rendered great service to his native town as a priest and then as bishop, especially when it was under siege. He took part in the Sixth Oecumenical Council in Constantinople at which Monothelitism was condemned.

Beatus Feb 19
+ 789. Born in Asturias in Spain, he became a monk at Liebana and was famous for his firm stand against Adoptionism. When Adoptionism was condemned, the saint went to the monastery of Valcavado and wrote his famous Commentary on the Apocalypse.

Gabinus Feb 19
+ c 295. A martyr in Rome who was related to the Emperor Diocletian, but was also the brother of Pope Gaius and father of the martyr St Susanna.

George of Lodève Feb 19
+ c 884. Born near Rodez in France, he became a monk at Saint-Foi-de-Conques in Rouergue but later moved to Vabres. He became Bishop of Lodève at an advanced age.

Mansuetus Feb 19
+ c 690. Born in Rome, he became Bishop of Milan in Italy (c 672) and showed both vigour and wisdom. He wrote a treatise against Monothelitism.

Odran Feb 19
+ c 452. A martyr in Ireland.

Publius, Julian, Marcellus and Companions Feb 19
? Martyrs in North Africa.

Quodvultdeus Feb 19
+ 450. Bishop of Carthage in North Africa, exiled by the Arian Genseric King of the Vandals, after the capture of the city in 439. He reposed in Naples in Italy.

Valerius Feb 19
+ c 450. Bishop of Antibes in the south of France.

February 20

Bolcan (Olcan) Feb 20
+ c 480. Baptised by St Patrick, Bolcan later became Bishop of Derkan in Ireland.

Colgan Feb 20
+ c 796. Called ‘the Wise’ and ‘the Chief Scribe of the Irish’. He was Abbot of Clonmacnoise in Offaly in Ireland.

Eleutherius of Tournai Feb 20
+ 532. Born in Tournai in Belgium, he became bishop there in 486 and enlightened the pagan Franks who had settled nearby. He died from wounds inflicted by Arian heretics.

Eucherius Feb 20
+ 743. Born in Orleans in France, he became a monk at Jumièges near Rouen in about 714. In 721 he became Bishop of Orleans, opposing the theft of church lands by Charles Martel. For this he was exiled to Cologne in Germany in 737. Here he became very popular and so was sent to Liège in Belgium. He spent the rest of his life at the monastery of St Trond near Maastricht in Holland.

Falco Feb 20
+ 512. Bishop of Maastricht in Holland from 495 on.

Leo of Catania Feb 20
703-787. Known in Sicily as St Leo the Wonderworker. He was a learned priest in Ravenna who became Bishop of Catania.

Valerius Feb 20
? First Bishop of Conserans in France.

February 21

Alexander of Adrumetum Feb 21
+ c 434. Martyred with others in North Africa.

Avitus II of Clermont Feb 21
+ 689. Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne in France from 676 to 689. He was one of the great bishops of the age.

Ercongotha Feb 21
+ 660. Daughter of King Erconbert of Kent and St Saxburgh. She became a nun at Faremoutiers-en-Brie under her aunt, St Ethelburgh, but reposed when very young.

Felix of Metz Feb 21
2nd cent. The third Bishop of Metz in France for over forty years.

Germanus and Randoald Feb 21
+ c 677. Born in Trier in Germany, he became a monk at Remiremont in the east of France. From there he went to Luxeuil and later he became Abbot of Granfield in the Val Moutier in Switzerland. Together with another monk, Randoald, he was martyred by the local magnate while interceding on behalf of the poor.

Gundebert (Gumbert, Gondelbert) Feb 21
+ c 676. Bishop of Sens in France, he left and went to the Vosges, where he founded the monastery of Senones (c 660).

Paterius Feb 21
+ 606. A monk, disciple and friend of St Gregory the Great. He became Bishop of Brescia in Lombardy in Italy and was a prolific writer.

Pepin of Landen Feb 21
+ c 646. Pepin, Duke of Brabant, he was the husband of St Ida and the father of St Gertrude of Nivelles and St Begga. He was described as ‘a lover of peace and the constant defender of truth and justice’.

Severus and Sixty-Two Companions Feb 21
3rd-4th cent. Martyrs in Syrmium in Pannonia.

Valerius Feb 21
+ 695. Born in Astorga in Spain, he became a monk and Abbot of San Pedro de Montes. He left several ascetic writings.

Verulus, Secundinus, Siricius, Felix, Servulus, Saturninus, Fortunatus and Companions Feb 21
+ c 434? Martyrs in North Africa, probably under the Vandals. Hadrumetum is given as the place of their martyrdom and their number as twenty-six.

February 22

Elwin Feb 22
6th cent. A holy man who accompanied St Breaca from Ireland to Cornwall.

John the Saxon Feb 22
+ 895. Born in Saxony in Germany, he became a monk and was asked by King Alfred to restore monasticism in England after the Danish attacks. He became Abbot of Athelney.

Maximian of Ravenna Feb 22
+ c 556. Consecrated Bishop of Ravenna in Italy in 546, he built the basilica of St Vitalis, which was dedicated in the presence of the Emperor Justinian and his wife Theodora. Holding a jewelled cross, he is depicted in mosaics standing next to the Emperor.

Paschasius Feb 22
+ c 312. The eleventh bishop of Vienne in France.

Raynerius (Raynier) Feb 22
+ c 967. A monk at Beaulieu near Limoges in France.

Telesphorus Jan 5 (In the East Feb 22)
+ c 136. A Greek who was Pope of Rome for ten years and was martyred under Hadrian.

February 23

Boswell (Boisil) Feb 23
+ c 661. Abbot of Melrose in Scotland. Sts Cuthbert and Egbert were among his monks. Both admired him greatly, as did St Bede. His favourite reading was the Gospel of St John.

Felix of Brescia Feb 23
+ c 650. The twentieth Bishop of Brescia in Italy. He was bishop for over forty years during which time he was occupied in fighting Arianism and other heresies.

Florentius of Seville Feb 23
+ c 485. A saint much venerated in Seville in Spain.

Jurmin Feb 23
653. An East Anglian prince, son or nephew of King Anna (634-654). His relics were enshrined at Bury St Edmunds in England.

Martha Feb 23
+ 251. A virgin-martyr beheaded in Astorga in Spain under Decius. Her relics are enshrined at Ribas de Sil and Ters.

Medrald (Mérald, Méraut) Feb 23
+ c 850. A monk at Saint-Evroult (Ebrulfus) of Ouche in France. Later he became Abbot of Vendôme.

Milburgh Feb 23
+ 715. The elder sister of St Mildred of Minster-in-Thanet in England and the second Abbess of Wenlock. Archbishop Theodore consecrated her as a nun. She had the gift of miracles and healing of the blind and lepers, as well as power over birds and the natural world.

Polycarp Feb 23
+ c 300. A priest in Rome noted for ministering to those in prison for their faith.

Romana Feb 23
+ 324. A virgin born in Rome who reposed at the age of eighteen while living as an anchoress in a cave on the banks of the Tiber in Italy.

Syncrotas, Antigonus, Rutilus, Libius, Senerotas and Rogatianus Feb 23
4th cent. Martyrs at Syrmium in Pannonia.

Willigis Feb 23
+ 1011. The son of a wheelwright, he became a priest at Hildesheim in Germany. Two years later he became Archbishop of Mainz. Although a statesman, Willigis was first and foremost a churchman and always remained humble and charitable to others.

February 24

Betto Feb 24
+ 918. A monk at Sainte Colombe in Sens in France. He became Bishop of Auxerre in 889.

Cumine the White Feb 24 or Oct 6
+ 669. Born in Ireland, he became Abbot of Iona and wrote a life of St Columba.

John the Harvester (Theristos) Feb 24
+ 1129. Of Calabrian parentage, he was born in Sicily, where his mother had been taken as a slave by the Saracens. He managed to escape to Calabria while still a child and there became a monk. Theristos, meaning harvester, refers to a miraculous harvest reaped by the saint.

Liudhard Feb 24
+ c 600. Chaplain and bishop of Queen Bertha of Kent. He may have played an important part in the conversion of King Ethelbert, preparing for the conversion of Kent.

Modestus Feb 24
+ 489. Bishop of Trier in Germany from 486 to 489. His relics are venerated in the church of St Matthias in Trier.

Montanus, Lucius, Julian, Victoricus, Flavian and Companions Feb 24
+ 259. A group of ten martyrs in North Africa, disciples of St Cyprian of Carthage, who suffered in that city under Valerian. The story of their imprisonment was told by themselves and that of their martyrdom by eyewitnesses.

Praetextatus (Prix) Feb 24
+ 586. Bishop of Rouen in France (550-586). For his courage in denouncing the wicked, he was cruelly persecuted and exiled. Recalled seven years later, he was martyred on Easter Sunday in his own church.

Primitiva (Primitivus) Feb 24
? An early martyr, probably in Rome.

February 25

Aldetrudis (Adeltrudis) Feb 25
+ c 696. Daughter of Sts Vincent Madelgarus and Waldetrudis and a niece of St Aldegund of Maubeuge in France, she was confided to her aunt’s care at this convent, where she became the second abbess.

Donatus, Justus, Herena and Companions Feb 25
3rd cent. A group of fifty martyrs who suffered in North Africa under Decius.

Ethelbert (Albert) of Kent Feb 25
560-616. King of Kent and High King of England, he protected St Augustine’s mission and may have been baptised by him as early as Pentecost 597. Though he never tried to force his subjects into Christianity, thousands followed his apostolic example.

Victor Feb 25
+ 995. A monk at St Gall in Switzerland who became a hermit in the Vosges in France where he reposed.

Walburgh (Walburga) Feb 25
c 710-779. Sister of Sts Willibald and Winebald. She became a nun at Wimborne in Dorset in England with St Tetta and followed St Lioba to Germany. She reposed as Abbess of Heidenheim, from where her relics were translated to Eichstätt. Miraculous healings come from the oil which still flows from the rock on which her shrine is placed.

February 26

Eithne (Ethenia) Feb 26 & May 26

6th cent. Founder and abbess of the Monastery in Isle of Jura in Hebrides Islands, Scotland. She is mother of St. Columbia of Iona, from Ireland – Rejoicings to Saint Eithne (Ethenia): Click HERE

Agricola Feb 26
+ c 594. Bishop of Nevers in France between 570 and 594.

Andrew of Florence Feb 26
+ c 407. Bishop of Florence in Italy.

Dionysius of Augsburg Feb 26
+ c 303. Venerated as the first Bishop of Augsburg in Germany. By tradition he was baptised and later consecrated bishop by St Narcissus. He was martyred under Diocletian.

Faustinian Feb 26
4th cent. The second Bishop of Bologna in Italy. He reorganised his diocese and lived to be a firm defender of Orthodoxy against Arianism.

Victor Feb 26
7th cent. A hermit in Arcis-sur-Aube in Champagne in France.

February 27

Alnoth Feb 27
+ c 700. A cowherd attached to St Werburgh’s monastery at Weedon in Northamptonshire in England. Later he lived as a hermit at Stowe near Bugbrooke and was martyred by robbers.

Baldomerus (Galmier) Feb 27
+ c 650. By trade a locksmith in Lyons in France, he entered the monastery of St Justus.

Comgan Feb 27
+ c 565. Abbot of Glenthsen or Killeshin in Ireland.

Herefrith Feb 27
+ 869? The relics of this Bishop of Lindsey, probably martyred by the Danes, were venerated at Thorney in Cambridgeshire in England.

Honorina (Honorine) Feb 27
? An early martyr in the north of France. Her relics are still venerated in Conflans Ste Honorine near Paris.

John of Gorze Feb 27
+ c 975. Born in Vandières near Metz in the east of France, after some years in the world, he made a pilgrimage to Rome. On his return he restored and entered the monastery of Gorze in Lorraine in 933. Emperor Otto I sent him as his ambassador to the Caliph Abd-er-Rahman of Cordoba, where he stayed for two years. In 960 he became Abbot of Gorze,.

Leander Feb 27
550-600. The elder brother of Sts Fulgentius, Isidore and Florentina. He entered a monastery in his early youth and was later sent to Constantinople on a diplomatic mission. There he met St Gregory the Great, who became a close friend. On his return to Spain, Leander became Archbishop of Seville. He revised and unified the Spanish liturgy, converted St Hermenegild and helped convert the Visigoths from Arianism. He was responsible for holding two national Councils at Toledo in 589 and 590.

February 28

Hilary (Hilarus) Feb 28
+ 468. Born in Sardinia, he became Pope of Rome in 461 and worked energetically against Nestorianism and Eutychianism and also consolidated the Church.

Llibio Feb 28
6th cent. The patron-saint of Llanlibio in Anglesey in Wales.

Macarius, Rufinus, Justus and Theophilus Feb 28
+ c 250. Potters by trade, they were martyred under Decius, perhaps in Rome, and were venerated in Bari and Bologna in Italy.

Maidoc (Madoc) Feb 28
6th cent. A sixth century bishop. Llanmadog in Wales was named after him.

Oswald Feb 28
+ 992. Born in England of a noble Danish family, he was the nephew of St Oda of Canterbury. He went to Fleury in France to learn from monastic life and later became Bishop of Worcester (961), identifying himself with St Dunstan and St Ethelwold in their efforts to revive monastic life in England. St Oswald founded monasteries at Ramsey and at Worcester. In 972 he became Archbishop of York. He repose on his knees after washing the feet of twelve poor people, as was his daily practice.

Romanus of Condat Feb 28
+ c 460. A Gallo-Roman who at the age of thirty-five went to live as a hermit in the Jura mountains, where he was followed by his brother St Lupicinus. Many disciples soon gathered round the two brothers, who then founded the monasteries of Condat (later known as Saint-Oyend) and Leuconne, over which they ruled together, and the convent of La Beaume (later called St-Romain-de-la-Roche) where their sister was abbess.

Ruellinus (Ruellin) Feb 28
6th cent. Successor of St Tudwal as Bishop of Tréguier in Brittany.

Sillan (Silvanus) Feb 28
+ c 610. A disciple of St Comgall in Bangor in Co. Down in Ireland and his second successor as abbot there.

MARCH 1-31

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

11796365_496845437158144_8627277011944037095_n

Source:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/hp.php

http://orthodox-synaxarion.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX ENGLAND

SAINTS BOOK – EASTERN ORTHODOX SYNAXARION OF CELTIC SAINTS & ALL SAINTS

March 1

Saints:

Righteous martyr Eudoxia of Heliopolis

Martyrs Nestorianus (Nestor), Tribimius, Marcellus, and Anthony, of Perge in Pamphylia, by the sword (249-251)

Martyr Antonina of Nicaea in Bithynia (c. 286-305)

Virgin-martyr Domnina of Syria (c. 460)[3][9][10]

Martyrs Antonius, Marcellus, Silvester and Sophronius,in Palestine.

Martyrs Agapius, Nicephorus and Charisius.

Saint Silvester

Saint Synesius, ascetic of Lysos, Cyprus

260 Martyrs of Rome (c. 269)

Martyrs Hermes, Adrian and Companions, in Numidia in North Africa under Maximian Herculeus (c. 290)

Martyr Luperculus (3rd century)

Martyrs Leo, Donatus, Abundantius, Nicephorus, and nine others – a group of thirteen martyrs who laid down their lives for Christ in North Africa.

Saint Felix III, Pope of Rome from 483-492 (492)

Saint Herculanus of Perugia, Bishop of Perugia in Italy, beheaded by soldiers of Totila of the Ostrogoths (549)

Saint Siviard, monk at Saint-Calais on the River Anisole in France, who succeeded his father as abbot of the monastery (729)

Venerable Luke of Sicily (Leo Luke, Leoluca), Abbot, Wonderworker (c. 900)

Martyrs Gervasius and Leo (Léon I, Leo of Rouen), brothers; St. Leo was the “Apostle of the Basques” and Bishop of Bayonne (c. 900).

Saint Rudesind, a Galician bishop and abbot (977)

Venerable Agapius of the Vatopedi Monastery on Mount Athos (13th century).

Venerable Martyrius, Abbot of Zelenetsk in Pskov (1603)

New martyr Parascevas of Trebizond (1659)

New Martyrs and Confessors

New hieromartyr Methodius, of Russia (1920)

New martyr Antonina of Kizliar, Abbess (1924)

New martyr Anastasia Andreyevna, Fool-for-Christ, in the North Caucasus.

New Hieromartyr Olga (1937)

New Hieromartyr Peter Lyubimov, protopresbyter (1938)

New Hieromartyrs:

Basil Nikitsky, John Streltsov, Benjamin Famintseva, and Michael Bukrinsky, priests;

New Hieromartyr Anthony Korzh;

Virgin-martyrs Anna, Daria Zaitseva, Eudokia Arkhipov, Alexandra Dyachkova;

Martyr Basil Arkhipov;

Virgin-martyr Hope (Nadezhda) Abakumova (1938)

New Hieromartyr Alexander Ilyenkov of Berdyansk (Simferopol-Crimea), priest (1942)

New Hieromartyr Basil Konstantinov-Grishin, priest (1943)

Repose of Barsanuphius (Hrynevich), Archbishop of Tver (1958)

Albinus (Aubin) March 1 

+ c 554. Born in Vannes in Brittany. A monk and Abbot of Tincillac, he then became Bishop of Angers in France (c 529-554). He played an important role at the third Council of Orleans (538). The monastery of Saint-Aubin in Angers was dedicated to him. Saint-Aubin de Moeslain (Haute Maine) is also a place of pilgrimage.

David March 1
+ c 600. Born in south Wales, he founded a monastery in Mynyw (Menevia) in the far west and is honoured as the first bishop of what is now called St Davids. The monks lived a very ascetic life and their monastery became a seedbed of saints. He attended the Council of Brefi in c 545. The foundation of a dozen monasteries and many miracles are attributed to him. His relics survive and are enshrined in the Cathedral and he is the patron-saint of Wales.

Martyr Eudocia of Heliopolis (2nd c.) March 1
Eudocia was from Heliopolis of Phoenicia (now Baalbek in Lebanon). A surpassingly beautiful pagan, she led a licentious life and became wealthy from the gifts of her many lovers. One day an elderly monk, Germanus, came to Heliopolis and stayed with a Christian whose house adjoined Eudocia’s. At night, he began to read aloud from the Psalter and a book on the Last Judgment. From next-door, Eudocia heard him. Her heart was reached, and she stood attentively all night, listening to every word in fear and contrition. The next day she begged Germanus to visit her, and he explained the saving Christian faith to her. Finally, Eudocia asked the local bishop to baptise her. She freed her servants, gave all her wealth to the poor, and entered a monastery.
“Her former lovers, enraged at her conversion, her refusal to return to her old ways, and the withering away of her beauty through the severe mortifications she practiced, betrayed her as a Christian to Vincent the Governor, and she was beheaded”(Great Horologion). According to some,this was under Trajan (98-117); according to others, under Hadrian (117-138).
The Prologue gives a somewhat different account: that after entering the monastery, Eudocia was permitted to pursue the monastic life in peace — with such devotion that, thirteen months after she entered the monastery, she was chosen as abbess. She lived for fifty-six years in the monastery, and was granted the gift of raising the dead. In her old age, a persecution of Christians arose, and Eudocia was beheaded along with many others. “Here is a wonderful example of how a vessel of uncleanness can be purified, sanctified and filled with a precious, heavenly fragrance by the grace of the Holy Spirit” (Prologue).

Felix II March 1
+ 492. Born in Rome, he was an ancestor of St Gregory the Great. He was Pope of Rome from 483 on. He fought against Monophysitism and Eutychianism and also remedied the evils caused in Africa by numerous apostasies during the Vandal persecution.

Herculanus Nov 7 and March 1
+ 549. Bishop of Perugia in Italy, beheaded by soldiers of Totila of the Ostrogoths.

Hermes, Adrian and Companions March 1
+ c 290. Martyrs in Numidia in North Africa under Maximian Herculeus.

Leo Luke March 1
+ c 900. He became Abbot of Corleone in Sicily and is also honoured in Calabria in Italy. He died a centenarian after eighty years of monastic life.

Leo of Rouen March 1
c 856-900. Born in Carentan in France, he became Bishop of Rouen but later preached the Gospel in Navarre in Spain and the Basque provinces, which had been devastated by the Saracens. He was beheaded near Bayonne, where he is the patron-saint.

Leo, Donatus, Abundantius, Nicephorus and Companions March 1
? A group of thirteen martyrs who laid down their lives for Christ in North Africa.

Luperculus (Lupercus) March 1
300. Perhaps born in Spain, he was martyred under Diocletian. He is especially venerated in Tarbes in France.

Marnock (Marnanus, Marnan, Marnoc) March 1
+ c 625. Born in Ireland, he was with St Columba at Iona and later became a bishop, who reposed in Annandale and was much venerated on the Scottish border. He gave his name to Kilmarnock in Scotland.

Monan March 1
+ 874. A saint from St Andrew’s and a missionary in the Firth of Forth area in Scotland. He was killed by the Danes together with many companions.

Rome (Martyrs of) March 1
+ 269. Two hundred and sixty martyrs condemned to dig sand on the Salarian Way in Rome and later shot to death with arrows in the amphitheatre under Claudius II.

Rudesind (Rosendo) March 1
907-977. Born of a noble family in Galicia in Spain, he became Bishop of Mondoñedo and then of Compostella. In this capacity he opposed with equal success both the Vikings and the Saracens. Exiled from Compostella through an intrigue, he founded the monastery of Celanova and other monasteries.

Siviard March 1
+ c 729. A monk at Saint-Calais on the River Anisole in France. He succeeded his father as abbot of the monastery. He wrote the life of St Calais, the founder of the monastery.

Swithbert March 1
c 647-713. A monk from Northumbria in England who went to Friesland in Holland with St Willibrord in 690. He preached the Gospel here with success. In 693 he was consecrated bishop at Ripon and returned to preach along the right bank of the Rhine in Germany. His work here was undone by Saxon invaders and he withdrew to the small island of Kaiserswerth on the Rhine near Düsseldorf. Here in 710 he founded a monastery, where he reposed and where his relics are still venerated.

March 2

Hieromartyrs Nestor the Bishop, and Tribiminus the Deacon, at Perge in Pamphylia (ca. 250)

Martyr Troadius of Neo-Caesarea, and those with him (251)

Virgin-martyr Euthalia of Sicily (252)

St. Cointus of Phrygia (Quintus of Phrygia), Confessor and Wonderworker (283)

Martyr Hesychius the Senator (the Palatine), of Antioch (ca. 304) (see also: May 10)

Hiero-Confessor Theodotus, Bishop of Cyrenia in Cyprus (ca. 326)

Venerable Saints Andronicus and the Athanasia (5th century)[11][12][note 2] (see also: October 9)

Saint Agathon of Egypt, monk (5th century)

Campania (Martyrs of) March 2
6th cent. Martyrs in Italy under the Lombards, probably several hundred in number.

Chad (Ceadda) March 2
+ 673. Brother of St Cedd, he was a monk at Lindisfarne with St Aidan and in Ireland. On returning to England, he became Abbot of Lastingham. He became Bishop of York, but then out of humility agreed to go to Mercia as bishop. He lived in Lichfield and reposed there. His relics are preserved in the Cathedral dedicated to him in Birmingham.

Cynibil (Cynibild) March 2
7th cent. A brother of Sts Chad and Cedd who helped enlighten England

Fergna March 2
+ 637. Called ‘the White’, he was a relative and disciple of St Columba of Ireland and was his successor as Abbot of Iona in Scotland.

Gistilian (Gistlian) March 2
5th-6th cent. The uncle of St David and a monk at Menevia, or St Davids, in Wales.

Joavan March 2
+ c 570. A Romano-Briton who went to Brittany to live with his uncle St Paul of Léon, by whom he was consecrated bishop.

Jovinus and Basileus March 2
+ c 258. Two martyrs, who suffered in Rome under Gallienus and Valerian and were buried on the Latin Way.

Lombards (Martyrs under the) March 2
+ c 579. A group of eighty martyrs killed by the Lombards in Campania in Italy.

Paul, Heraclius, Secundilla and Januaria March 2
+ c 305. Martyrs who suffered under Diocletian at Porto Romano at the mouth of the Tiber in Italy.

Rome (Martyrs of) March 2
+ 219. A large number of martyrs martyred in Rome under Alexander Severus and the prefect Ulpian.

Slebhene (Slebhine) March 2
+ 767. A monk from Ireland, he became Abbot of Iona in Scotland from 752 to 767.

Willeic March 2
+ 726. A disciple of St Swithbert who made him Abbot of Kaiserwerth in Germany.

March 3

Saints:

Martyrs Eutropius and Cleonicus of Amasea, and Basiliscus of Comana (308)

Venerable Piama, virgin (337)

Hieromartyr Theodoretus, Bishop, of Antioch, by beheading (361-363)

Venerable Alexandra of Alexandria (4th century)

Venerable Saints Zenon and Zoilus

Venerable Shio Mgvime, monk, of Georgia (6th century)

Saint John IV (Chrysostom), Bishop of Georgia (1001)

Saint John V (Chrysostom), Bishop of Georgia (1048)

Anselm March 3
+ 803. Of noble origin, Anselm became a monk and founded one monastery in Fanano near Modena in Italy and a second one in Nonantola. He attached hospitals and hostels to both.

Arthelais March 3
6th cent. One of the patron-saints of Benevento in Italy, where she fled from Constantinople.

Calupan March 3
+ 575. A monk at Meallet in Auvergne in France, who lived as a hermit in a cave.

Camilla March 3
+ c 437. Born in Civitavecchia, he became a disciple of St Germanus of Auxerre in France, where she lived as an anchoress.

Cele-Christ March 3
+ c 728. St Cele-Christ, otherwise ‘Worshipper of Christ’, he lived as a hermit for many years, but was eventually forced to become a bishop in Leinster.

Cunegund March 3
+ 1039. Wife of Henry II, she founded the convent of Kaufungen, which she entered on the first anniversary of her husband’s death, showing great humility.

Felix, Luciolus, Fortunatus, Marcia and Companions March 3
? A group of forty martyrs in North Africa.

Foila (Faile) March 3
6th cent. The sister of St Colgan. The two are patron-saints of the parishes of Kil-Faile (Kileely) and Kil-Colgan in Galway in Ireland.

Hemiterius and Cheledonius March 3
? 4th cent. Two martyrs in Spain, believed to have been soldiers. They suffered in Calahorra in Old Castile.

Lamalisse March 3
7th cent. A hermit in Scotland, he left his name to the islet of Lamlash off the coast of the Isle of Arran in Ireland.

Non (Nonna, Nonnita) March 3
5th cent. The mother of St David, patron-saint of Wales, she probably came from a ruling family in Dyfed: a chapel and a well near her son’s Cathedral still bear her name. Another can be found in Altarnum in Cornwall, where she may have moved and where her relics survived, even though she reposed in Brittany.

Sacer (Mo-Sacra) March 3
7th cent. Founder of the monastery of Saggard near Dublin in Ireland.

Titian March 3
+ c 536. Germanic by birth, he became Bishop of Brescia in Italy.

Winwaloe March 3
6th cent. Born in Brittany, he became a disciple of St Budoc on Lauren Island and founded the monastery at Landevennec. Several churches in Cornwall are dedicated to him, indicating that the saint had some connection there.

March 4

Saints:

Saint Julian of Alexandria, Bishop of Alexandria (189)

Martyrs Paul and his sister Juliana, and Quadratus, Acacius, and Stratonicus, at Ptolemais in Egypt (273)

Venerable Gerasimus of Jordan (475)

Saint Gregory of Constantius in Cyprus, Bishop

Saint James the Faster, of Phoenicia (Syria) (6th century)

Adrian and Companions March 4
+ c 875. A bishop on the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth in Scotland. He was martyred by the Danes, together with other monks.

Appian March 4
+ c 800. Born in Liguria in Italy, he became a monk at the monastery of St Peter of Ciel d’Oro in Pavia in Italy. Eventually he became a hermit in Commacchio on the shores of the Adriatic and brought Christ to that region.

Basinus March 4
+ c 705. Monk and Abbot of St Maximin in Trier in Germany, he succeeded St Numerian as bishop of the city.

Felix of Rhuys March 4
+ 1038. Born near Quimper in Brittany, he became a hermit on Ouessant and afterwards a monk at Fleury (Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire) in France. He restored the monastery of Rhuys, founded by St Gildas, which had been destroyed by the Vikings.

Leonard of Avranches March 4
+ c 614. In his early years he lived badly, but once converted, largely by the prayers of his mother, he was elected Bishop of Avranches.

Lucius I March 4
+ 254. He succeeded St Cornelius as Pope of Rome in 253 and was at once sent into exile. He was referred to as a martyr by St Cyprian.

Owen (Owin) March 4
+ c 680. After working as a steward in the household of St Audrey (Etheldred), he became a monk at Lastingham in England with St Chad. When the latter became Bishop of Mercia, he settled St Owen with other monks at a monastery near Lichfield.

Rome (Martyrs of) March 4
+ 260 (?) A group of nine hundred martyrs buried in the catacombs of Callistus on the Appian Way in Rome.

March 5

Martyr Conon of Isauria (1st century)

Martyr Nestor, father of Martyr Conon of Isauria.

Martyr Onisius (Onesimus) of Isauria, by beheading (1st century)

Saint Theophilus, Bishop of Caesarea in Palestine (200)

Martyr Conon the Gardener, of Pamphylia (251)

Martyrs Archelaus, Kyrillos, Photios,[9] Virgin-martyr Irais (Rhais) of Antinoë, and 152 Martyrs in Egypt (ca. 308)

Venerable Conon of Cyprus (4th century)

Martyr Eulogius of Palestine.

Martyr Eulampius of Palestine, by the sword.

Venerable Mark the Ascetic of Egypt (Mark the Athenian, Mark the Faster) (5th century)

Saint Hesychius the Faster, of Bithynia (790)

Caron March 5
? The church at Tregaron in Dyfed in Wales is dedicated to him.

Carthage the Elder March 5
+ c 540. The successor of St Kieran as Bishop of Ossory in Ireland.

Clement March 5
c 800. Abbot of Santa Lucia in Syracuse in Sicily.

Colman of Armagh March 5
5th cent. A disciple of St Patrick in Ireland

Eusebius and Companions March 5
? A group of ten martyrs who suffered in North Africa.

Eusebius March 5
+ c 423. Born in Cremona in Italy, he became an abbot in Bethlehem and took part in the struggle against Origenism.

Kieran (Kieman, Kyran, Ciaran) March 5
+ c 530. Called ‘the first-born of the saints of Ireland’. Born in Ossory, he was probably consecrated bishop by St Patrick and has been venerated from time immemorial as the first Bishop of Ossory and founder of the monastery of Saighir.

Oliva March 5
+ 138. Martyred, perhaps in Brescia in the north of Italy, under the Emperor Hadrian.

Piran (Pyran) March 5
+ c 480. A hermit near Padstow in Cornwall. He is venerated as the patron-saint of miners: Perranporth is named after him.

Virgilius of Arles March 5
+ c 610. A monk from Lérins who became Bishop of Arles in France. He probably consecrated Augustine Archbishop of Canterbury.

March 6

Baldred (Balther) March 6
+ 756. A priest in Lindisfarne in England, he became a hermit at Tyningham on the Scottish border, where he lived on Bass Rock, near North Berwick, surrounded by the sea. His relics were enshrined in Durham, with those of St Bilfrid.

Basil March 6
+ 335. Bishop of Bologna in Italy for twenty years, 315-335.

Bilfrid (Billfrith) March 6
8th cent. A hermit at Lindisfarne and an expert goldsmith, who bound in gold the Lindisfarne Gospels, written and illuminated by Bishop Edfrith.

Cadroe (Cadroel) March 6
+ 976. Born in Scotland, he lived in Armagh in Ireland. He went to France and lived as a monk at Fleury. He then became Abbot of Waulsort on the Meuse in Belgium and finally lived in Metz.

Chrodegang March 6
+ 766. Bishop of Metz in the east of France, he took part in several Councils. He introduced the Roman liturgy and singing into his diocese and the north of Europe in general.

Cyneburgh, Cyneswith and Tibba March 6
+ c 680. Cyneburgh and Cyneswith were daughters of Penda of Mercia in England, who was notorious for his opposition to Orthodoxy. The former founded a convent in Castor in Northamptonshire and was followed as abbess by her sister. Tibba was a relative who joined them at the convent. Their relics were enshrined together.

Fridolin March 6
+ c 540. Born in Ireland, he became a monk at Luxeuil in France. Later he founded the monastery of Sackingen and is venerated as the Apostle of the Upper Rhine in Germany.

Marcian March 6
+ 120. By tradition he was a disciple of St Barnabas and the first Bishop of Tortona in Piedmont in Italy, where he was martyred under Hadrian after an episcopate of forty-five years.

Patrick March 6
c 307. Born in Malaga in Spain, he became Bishop there. He later fled to Auvergne in France.

March 7

Ardo March 7
+ 843. Born in Languedoc in France, he changed his name from Smaragdus on becoming a monk at Aniane with its first Abbot, St Benedict, whom he later succeeded as abbot.

Deifer March 7
6th cent. Founder of Bodfari in Clwyd in Wales.

Drausinus (Drausius) March 7
+ c 576. Bishop of Soissons in France, he did much to encourage monasticism.

Enodoch (Wenedoc) March 7
+ c 520. A saint in Wales.

Eosterwine March 7
+ 688. A Northumbrian noble, he entered the monastery of Wearmouth with his relative St Benedict. He succeeded St Benedict as abbot. He was celebrated for his gentleness.

Gaudiosus of Brescia March 7
+ 445 ? Bishop of Brescia in Italy, where his relics were venerated.

Perpetua, Felicity, Saturus (Satyrus), Saturninus, Revocatus and Secundulus March 7 (in the East Feb 1)
+ 203. Vivia Perpetua was a young married woman of good social position. Felicity, also married, was a slave. The others were catechumens and Saturus perhaps their instructor. All were imprisoned together in Carthage in North Africa as a law of Septimus Severus forbade conversions to the faith. Secundulus died in prison: the others were thrown to the wild beasts in the amphitheatre on March 7. Their Acts were written by Saturus, one of the martyrs, and completed by an eyewitness.

March 8

Beoadh (Beatus) March 8
+ c 518. Bishop of Ardcarne in Roscommon in Ireland.

Cyril, Rogatus, Felix, another Rogatus, Beata, Herenia, Felicitas, Urban, Silvanus and Mamillus March 8
? Martyrs in North Africa. St Cyril is described as a bishop.

Felix of Dunwich March 8
Born in Burgundy in France, he went to England to work for the enlightenment of East Anglia. In about 631 he went to Dunwich, or possible Felixstowe, and built his Cathedral, now beneath the sea. He preached with great success in Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire and is honoured as the Apostle of East Anglia, where several places are named after him and Orthodox still honour his memory.

Humphrey (Hunfrid) March 8
+ 871. A monk at the monastery of Prüm in Germany, he became Bishop of Therouanne in France and was Abbot of St Bertin. He was a source of strength and comfort to the people during the Norman invasion. He kept the feast of the Dormition with special splendour.

Julian of Toledo March 8
+ 690. A monk at Agali in Spain under St Eugene, whom he succeeded first as Abbot and in 680 as Archbishop of Toledo. He was the first Metropolitan of All Iberia. Presiding over several national Councils, revising and developing the Mozarabic liturgy, he was a prolific writer and outstanding churchman.

Pontius March 8
+ c 260. A deacon of the Church of Carthage in North Africa. He was with St Cyprian in his exile, at his trial and execution, and wrote his Life.

Provinus March 8
+ c 420. Born in France, he became a disciple of St Ambrose in Milan and became Bishop of Como in Italy in 391.

Senan (Senames) March 8
+ c 540 A monk in Kilmanagh in Ireland. Having founded a monastery, probably in Enniscorthy, he is said to have visited Rome and on his way home stayed with St David in Wales. On his return to Ireland he founded more churches and monasteries, notably one in Iniscarra near Cork. Finally he settled on Scattery Island in the Shannon estuary where he was buried.

March 9

Antony March 9
10th cent. A monk at Luxeuil in France, he became a hermit in Froidemont in Franche-Comté.

Bosa March 9
+ 705. A monk at Whitby in England, he was consecrated Bishop of York by St Theodore. St Bede praises St Bosa in the following words: ‘A man beloved of God…of most unusual merit and holiness’.

Constantine March 9
+ 576. A noble of Cornwall, who after a life of vice, came to repentance in Wales and Ireland. From here he went as a missionary to Scotland, where he was put to death by thieves. Two places in Cornwall are named after him.

Pacian March 9
+ c 390. Bishop of Barcelona in Spain from 365. A work he wrote on repentance still exists.

March 10

Attalas March 10
+ 627. Born in Burgundy in France, he became a monk at Lérins. From there he went to Luxeuil with St Columbanus, whom he followed to Bobbio in the north of Italy, helping him to found the monastery there and succeeding him as abbot (615).

Droctoveus (Drotté) March 10
+ c 580. A disciple of St Germanus of Paris, he became Abbot of St Symphorian in Autun in France. Later he was called back to Paris to be the first Abbot of St Vincent and the Holy Cross – afterwards renamed Saint-Germain-des-Prés.

Emilian (Eminian) March 10
+ 675. Born in Ireland, he became a monk and then Abbot of Lagny in France.

Failbhe the Little March 10
+ 754. For seven years Abbot of Iona in Scotland, where he reposed at the age of eighty.

Himelin March 10
+ c 750. Probably born in Ireland, he was a priest who reposed at Vissenaeken near Tirlemont in Belgium on his return from a pilgrimage to Rome.

Kessog (Mackessog) March 10
+ c 560. Born in Cashel in Tipperary in Ireland, even as a child he is said to have worked miracles. He became a missionary and preached in Scotland, where he became a bishop. According to one tradition he was martyred at Bandry. He is the patron-saint of Lennox.

Sedna March 10
+ c 570. Bishop of Ossory in Ireland and a friend of St Luanus.

Silvester March 10
+ c 420. A companion of St Palladius in enlightening Ireland.

Simplicius March 10
+ 483. Born in Tivoli in Italy, he became Pope of Rome from 468 to 483. He upheld the decisions of the Council of Chalcedon against Monophysitism. When the Western Roman Empire collapsed in 476, he also had to deal with the Arian King Odoacer.

Victor March 10
? A martyr in North Africa under Decius.

March 11

Alberta March 11
+ c 286. One of the first victims of the persecution under Diocletian. She suffered in Agen in France with St Faith and others.

Angus March 11
+ c 830. Known as ‘the Culdee’. A monk at Clonenagh in Ireland and then at Tallacht, he is remembered for his celebrated hymn to the saints, called Felire. From Tallacht he returned to Clonenagh where he became a bishop.

Benedict Crispus of Milan March 11
+ 725. Archbishop of Milan in Italy for forty-five years.

Candidus, Piperion and Companions March 11
+ c 254-259. Twenty-two martyrs who suffered in North Africa either in Carthage or else in Alexandria, probably under Valerian and Gallienus.

Constantine March 11
? A confessor in Carthage in North Africa.

Eulogius of Cordoba March 11
+ 859. A prominent priest in Cordoba in Spain when the Moorish persecution was at its height. Outstanding for his courage and learning, he encouraged the Orthodox in their sufferings and wrote The Memorial of the Saints for their benefit. He himself suffered martyrdom for protecting St Leocritia, a young girl converted from Islam.

Firmian (Fermanus, Firminus) March 11
+ c 1020. Abbot of San Sabino Piceno near Fermo in Italy.

Heraclius and Zosimus March 11
+ c 263. Martyrs in North Africa who suffered in Carthage under Valerian and Gallienus.

Peter the Spaniard March 11
? A pilgrim from Spain to Rome who settled as a hermit in Babuco near Veroli.

Vigilius March 11
+ 685. Successor of St Palladius (661) as Bishop of Auxerre in France. By order of the mayor of the palace he was murdered in a forest near Compiègne.

March 12

Alphege the Elder March 12
+ 951. Also called ‘the Bald’.. He became Bishop of Winchester in England in 935. He encouraged many to become monks, notably his relative St Dunstan, whom he ordained priest.

Mamilian (Maximilian) March 12
? A martyr in Rome.

Maximilian March 12
+ 295. A young martyr who refused to do military service and was therefore executed in Thebeste in Numidia in North Africa.

Mura McFeredach (Muran, Murames) March 12
+ c 645. Born in Donegal in Ireland, he became Abbot of Fahan in Co. Derry. He is the patron-saint of Fahan where his cross still stands.

Paul Aurelian March 12
+ c 575. A Romano-Briton by origin, he was born in Wales and became a monk with Sts Illtyd, David, Samson and Gildas. He lived for a time on Caldey Island, from where he went to Brittany. He established a monastery at Porz-Pol on the Isle of Ouessant and finally went to Ouismor (now Saint-Pol-de-Léon) where he became bishop.

Peter the Deacon March 12
+ c 605. The disciple, secretary and companion of St Gregory the Great. He is venerated as the patron-saint of Salassola in Italy.

Vindician March 12
+ 712. A disciple of St Eligius, he became Bishop of Arras-Cambrai in France and bravely protested against the excesses of the Merovingian Kings and the all-powerful mayors of the palace.

March 13

Ansovinus March 13
+ 840. Born in Camerino in Italy, after living as a hermit at Castel Raimondo near Torcello, he became bishop of his native town. He accepted the office on condition that his see should be exempt from the service of recruiting soldiers, then imposed on most bishops.

Gerald March 13
+ 732. Born in England, he followed St Colman from Lindisfarne to Ireland and became his successor in the English monastery in Mayo.

Heldrad (Eldrad) March 13
+ 842. Born in Provence in France, he spent his fortune on good works and went to Rome as a pilgrim. Then he became a monk at the monastery of Novalese in Italy and was abbot there for thirty years.

Kevoca (Kennotha, Quivoca) March 13
7th cent. A saint honoured in Kyle in Scotland.

Mochoemoc (Mochaemhog, Pulcherius, Vulcanius) March 13
+ c 656. Born in Munster in Ireland, he was the nephew of St Ita. He became a monk at Bangor in Co. Down under St Comgall and later founded Liath-Mochoemoc.

Ramirus and Companions March 13
+ c 554 (or 630). A monk at the monastery of St Claudio in Leon in Spain. Two days after the abbot, St Vincent, was martyred, Ramirus and all the other monks were martyred by the Arian Visigoths while they sang the Creed..

Rudericus (Roderick) and Salomon (Solomon) March 13
+ 857. Roderick was a priest in Cabra near Cordoba in Spain who was betrayed by his Muslim brother and imprisoned there. In prison he met his fellow-martyr, Salomon. They were both martyred in Cordoba.

March 14

Benedict July 11 (In the East March 14)
c 480-550. Born near Nursia in Umbria in central Italy, at the age of twenty he went to live as a hermit in a cave near Subiaco. Many disciples flocked to him and he built a laura, composed of twelve small monasteries for them. About the year 530 he left Subiaco for Montecassino, where he founded a monastery and where he lived the rest of his life as a deacon and famed as a wonderworker. He reposed while standing in prayer before the altar. Some relics of St Benedict were later translated to France but others remained at Montecassino.

Boniface Curitan March 14
+ c 660. Bishop of Ross, very likely a Roman by birth, he enlightened the Picts and Scots. He is said to have founded a great many churches.

Diaconus March 14
6th cent. His real name lost, he was a deacon in the Marsi in central Italy. He was martyred together with two monks by the Lombards.

Leo March 14
? A bishop and martyr, perhaps under the Arians, in the Agro Verano in Italy.

Matilda (Mathildis, Maud) March 14
+ 968. Wife of the German king Henry the Fowler, she was very generous and founded, among others, the monasteries of Nordhausen, Pöhlde, Engern and Quedlinburg in Germany. She was a widow for thirty years and suffered greatly at the hands of her sons, by whom she was despoiled of most of her possessions.

Peter and Aphrodisius March 14
5th cent. Martyrs under the Arian Vandals in North Africa.

Rome (Martyrs of) March 14
+ c 67. Forty-seven martyrs baptised by tradition by the Apostle Peter. They are said to have suffered in Rome under Nero, all on the same day.

Talmach March 14
7th cent. A disciple of St Barr at Lough Erc in Ireland and founder of a monastery.

Valeria (Martyrs of) March 14
5th cent. In the province of Valeria in Italy two monks were slain by the Lombards by being hanged on a tree. Although dead, they were heard singing psalms even by their enemies.

March 15

Aristobulus March 15
1st cent. Traditionally one of the Seventy, he is the Aristobulus mentioned by St Paul (Romans 16,11). Britain was given to him as the place of his preaching and martyrdom.

Leocritia (Lucretia) March 15
+ 859. A holy virgin in Cordoba in Spain. Her parents were Moors, but she was converted to Orthodoxy and as a result was driven from her home. She was sheltered by St Eulogius but both were flogged and beheaded.

Mancius March 15
5th (or 6th?) cent. Born in Rome, he was bought as a slave by Jewish traders and taken to Evora in Portugal where he was martyred by his masters.

Probus March 15
+ c 571. Bishop of Rieti in central Italy.

Speciosus March 15
+ c 555. A wealthy landowner from Campania in Italy who became a monk at Montecassino with his brother Gregory. He was attached to the new foundation at Terracina but reposed in Capua.

Zacharias March 15
+ 752. He was born in San Severino in Calabria in Italy of a Greek family. Chosen Pope of Rome in 741, he was influential in helping Europe remain Orthodox.

March 16

Abban March 16
5th cent. A nephew of St Ibar, he founded Kill-Abban monastery in Leinster in Ireland.

Agapitus March 16
4th cent. Bishop of Ravenna in Italy.

Alexander I May 3 (In the East March 16)
c 115. The fifth Pope of Rome from c 107 to c 115.

Dentlin (Dentelin, Denain) March 16
7th cent. The son of St Vincent Madelgarus and St Waldetrudis. He was only seven years old when he reposed, confessing the Faith.

Eusebia March 16
+ c 680. Eldest daughter of Sts Adalbald and Rictrudis, she became a nun at Hamage or Hamay in Belgium, a convent which had been founded by her grandmother St Gertrude and where she later became abbess.

Finian March 16
+ ? c 560. A disciple of St Columba and Abbot of Swords near Dublin in Ireland.

Gregory Makar March 16
+ c 1000. An Armenian who became a monk and was elected Bishop of Nicopolis in Armenia. He fled to France and settled as a hermit in Pithiviers near Orleans.

Heribert March 16
+ 1022. Born in Worms in Germany and a monk at Gorze in France, he became Archbishop of Cologne. He was an outstanding churchman, learned, zealous and enterprising. He built the monastery of Deutz on the Rhine, where he was buried.

Hilary, Tatian, Felix, Largus and Denis March 16
+ c 284. Hilary was Bishop of Aquileia, Tatian his deacon, and the others laymen. All were beheaded under Numerian.

Megingaud (Mengold, Megingoz) March 16
+ 794. He became a monk at Fritzlar in Germany (738) and after some years abbot. Later he succeeded St Burchard as Bishop of Würzburg (c 754).

March 17

Agricola (Agrele, Aregle) March 17
+ 580. Bishop and ascetic of Châlon-sur-Saône in France.

Alexander and Theodore March 17
2nd century? Early martyrs in Rome.

Alexis July 17 (In the East March 17)
+ early 5th cent. A saint originally distinguished by the title of ‘the man of God’. The son of a Roman senator, in order to serve God in humility, he fled from his parental home disguised as a beggar. He set sail for Edessa where after seventeen years an Icon of the Mother of God proclaimed him ‘the man of God’. He fled again and eventually returned to Rome and for years lived unrecognised as a beggar in his own home. After his repose a mysterious voice again proclaimed him ‘the man of God’.

Gertrude of Nivelles March 17
626-659. Daughter of Pepin of Landen and of St Ida. Ida founded the convent of Nivelles for herself and her daughter but insisted on Gertrude being the first abbess. Though only twenty years of age, Gertrude accepted this obedience. At the age of thirty she resigned in favour of her niece Wilfetrudis.

Patrick March 17
c 390-461? The Apostle of Ireland. A Romano-Briton born in what is now England, at the age of sixteen he was abducted and taken to Ireland. However, he escaped after six years. He then went to monasteries in France and about the year 432 returned to Ireland as a bishop. He travelled throughout the country preaching, teaching, building churches, establishing monasteries and converting chiefs and bards. He was the first organiser of the Irish Church and was based in Armagh.

March 18

Edward the Martyr March 18
+ 978. The son of Edgar the Peaceful, he became King of England at the age of thirteen, in 978 he was murdered by plotters at Corfe and buried in Wareham in Dorset. He was at once acclaimed as a martyr. His relics are venerated in an Orthodox church in Surrey to this day.

Egbert March 18
+ c 720. A monk at Ripon, where his relics were venerated.

Frediano (Frigidanus, Frigdianus) March 18
+ 588. Born in Ireland, he went on pilgrimage to Rome and settled in Italy as a hermit on Monte Pisano. In 566 he became Bishop of Lucca. He rebuilt the Cathedral after it had been burnt down by the Lombards.

Narcissus and Felix March 18
+ c 307. A bishop and his deacon honoured as martyrs in Gerona in Catalonia in Spain.

March 19

Adrian March 19
+ c 668. A disciple of St Landoald, he was murdered while begging alms for his monastery near Maastricht in Holland and was venerated as a martyr.

Alcmund March 19
+ c 800. A prince of Northumbria in England, after many years of exile among the Picts of Scotland, he was martyred in Shropshire. He was venerated first in Lilleshall and then in Derby.

Apollonius and Leontius (Leontinus) March 19
? By tradition early Bishops of Braga in Portugal.

Auxilius March 19
+ c 460. A companion of St Patrick, he became Bishop of Killossey in Ireland.

Gemus March 19
? A monk, probably at Moyenmoutier in Alsace, now in France. His relics were enshrined at Hürbach.

John the Syrian of Pinna March 19
6th cent. A Syrian monk who settled in Pinna near Spoleto in Italy. He was abbot of a large monastic colony there for forty-four years.

Lactan March 19
+ 672. Born near Cork in Ireland, St Comgall entrusted him to found a monastery at Achadh-Ur, now Freshford, in Kilkenny.

Landoald and Amantius March 19
+ c 668. A priest and deacon who helped enlighten what is now Belgium and north-eastern France. They founded the church at Wintershoven.

Leontius March 19
+ 640. Bishop of Saintes in France and a friend of St Malo.

Quintus, Quintilla, Quartilla, Mark and Companions March 19
? Martyrs venerated in Sorrento near Naples in Italy. The three first were perhaps a brother and two sisters.

March 20

Benignus March 20
+ 725. A monk and Abbot of Fontenelle in France, he was exiled and went to Flay where the monks asked him to be their abbot. He later returned to Fontenelle.

Cuthbert March 20
+ 687. He was a shepherd boy until he became a monk at Melrose in Scotland. After the Council of Whitby, he went to Lindisfarne where he became Abbot. In March 685, he was consecrated Bishop of Lindisfarne. After his repose his relics were found to be incorrupt and eventually they were taken to Durham. One of the most famous English saints, he is the called the Wonderworker of England. His relics are revered in Durham to this day.

Herbert March 20
+ 687. A priest and friend of St Cuthbert, who lived as a hermit on the island named after him on Lake Derwentwater in England. The two saints were granted their prayer to repose on the same day.

Martin of Braga March 20
520-580. Born in Pannonia, he became a monk in Palestine, but later went to Galicia in Spain where he preached to the pagan Suevi. He was Bishop of Mondoñedo and then of Braga. He introduced monasticism throughout north-western Spain and Portugal. Several of his writings still exist.

Photina, Joseph, Victor, Sebastian, Anatolius, Photius, Photis (Photides), Parasceve and Cyriaca March 20
? Martyred with other Orthodox in Rome under Nero.

Remigius March 20
+ 783. A noble, he became Abbot of Münster near Colmar in France and in 776 Bishop of Strasbourg.

Tertricus March 20
+ 572. Son of St Gregory, Bishop of Langres in France, and uncle of St Gregory of Tours. He succeeded his father as Bishop of Langres in about 540.

Urbitius March 20
+ c 420. Bishop of Metz in the east of France. He built a church in honour of St Felix of Nola which became the church of the monastery of St Clement.

William of Peñacorada March 20
+ c 1042. Monk at the monastery of Satagún in León in Spain. In 988 he fled with the other monks from the Saracens and settled at Peñacorada, where he built the monastery of Santa Maria de los Valles, later named after him San Guillermo de Peñacorada.

Wulfram March 20
7th Cent. Bishop of Sens, he worked to enlighten the Frisians, helped by monks from the monastery of Fontenelle. After many years among the Frisians, he returned to Fontenelle where he reposed. His relics are still in Abbeville in the north of France.

March 21

Birillus March 21
+ c 90. By tradition he was consecrated first Bishop of Catania in Sicily by the Apostle Peter, with whom he had travelled from Antioch. He reposed in extreme old age.

Enda (Endeus, Enna) March 21
+ c 530. Brother of St Fanchea, he was the earliest founder of monasteries in Ireland, of which the main one was on Inishmore. Sts Kieran and Brendan were among his disciples.

Lupicinus March 21
+ c 480. Brother of St Romanus of Condat, with whom he founded the monasteries of St Claud (Condat) in the Jura, and Lauconne.

Philemon and Domninus March 21
? Born in Rome, they preached the Gospel in various parts of Italy and were martyred.

March 22

Darerca March 22
? 5th cent. The sister of St Patrick of Ireland. Her name means constant and firm love. She is reputed to have had fifteen sons, some ten of whom became bishops.

Deogratius March 22
+ 457. He became Bishop of Carthage in North Africa in 456, fourteen years after the repose of his predecessor, St Quodvultdeus, who had been driven into exile by the Arian Vandals. He sold all that he or his church possessed in order to ransom prisoners of the Arian King.

Epaphroditus March 22
1st cent. By tradition the first Bishop of Terracina in Italy. He may have been one of the Seventy Apostles and mentioned by the Apostle Paul in Philippians 2,25).

Failbhe March 22
+ c 680. Abbot of Iona in Scotland. He came from Ireland and was the brother of St Finan of Rath.

Lea March 22
+ 384. An aristocrat in Rome who on the death of her husband entered the convent of St Marcella, where she spent the rest of her life serving the nuns.

Octavian and Companions March 22
+ 484. Octavian, Archdeacon of the Church in Carthage in North Africa, was martyred with several thousand companions under the Arian Vandal King Hunneric.

Paul of Narbonne March 22
+ c 250. Consecrated in Rome towards the middle of the third century and sent to France to preach the Gospel, which he did with great success in Narbonne.

Saturninus and Companions March 22
? A group of ten martyrs in North Africa.

Trien (Trienan) March 22
5th cent. A disciple of St Patrick and Abbot of Killelga in Ireland.

March 23 Benedict of Campania March 23
+ c 550. A hermit in the Campagna in Italy who was miraculously delivered from death by burning at the hands of Totila the Goth.

Ethilwald March 23
+ 699. A monk at Ripon in England, he lived as a hermit on Inner Farne for twelve years.

Felix and Companions March 23
5th cent. A group of twenty-one martyrs in North Africa.

Felix of Montecassino March 23
+ c 1000. A monk at Montecassino. On account of the many miracles at his tomb the Bishop of Chieti enshrined his relics for veneration.

Fidelis March 23
? A martyr in North Africa.

Maidoc (Mo-Mhaedog) March 23
5th cent. Abbot of Fiddown in Kilkenny in Ireland.

Nicon and Companions March 23
+ c 250. Nicon was a Roman soldier of distinction who, while travelling in the East, became a Christian and a monk. His master left him with two hundred disciples. When persecution threatened Palestine, they fled to Sicily where they were martyred under Decius.

Victorian, Frumentius and Companions March 23
+ 484. Victorian, a former pro-consul in Africa, and four wealthy merchants were martyred in Hadrumetum under King Hunneric for refusing to become Arians.

March 24

Caimin (Cammin) of Inniskeltra March 24 March 25
+ 653. An ascetic who lived as a hermit on an island in Lough Derg in Ireland. Many disciples were attracted to him on account of his holiness. Later he founded a monastery and church on the island of the Seven Churches and worked with St Senan. A fragment of the Psalter of St Caimin, copied in his own hand, still exists.

Cairlon (Caorlan) March 24
6th cent. An abbot in Ireland who became Archbishop of Cashel.

Domangard (Donard) March 24
+ c 500. The patron of Maghera in Co. Down in Ireland, who lived as a hermit on the mountain now called Slieve-Donard after him.

Hildelith March 24
+ c 712. A princess from England who became a nun either at Chelles or at Faremoutiers-en-Brie in France. She was recalled to England by St Erconwald of London to Barking, where she later became abbess, admired for her wisdom and culture.

Latinus of Brescia March 24
+ 115. Flavius Latinus succeeded St Viator as the third Bishop of Brescia in Italy (84-115). He suffered imprisonment and torture with other Christians.

Macartan (Macartin, Maccarthen) March 24
+ c 505. An early disciple and companion of St Patrick of Ireland, who consecrated him Bishop of Clogher.

Mark and Timothy March 24
+ c 150. Two martyrs in Rome.

Pigmenius March 24
+ 362. A priest in Rome thrown into the Tiber under Julian the Apostate.

Romulus and Secundus (Secundulus) March 24
? Two brothers who suffered in North Africa.

March 25

Alfwold March 25
+ 1058. A monk at Winchester who was chosen as Bishop of Sherborne in 1045. He was known for his great devotion to Sts Cuthbert and Swithun.

Barontius and Desiderius March 25
c 725. Barontius became a monk at Lonrey near Bourges in France. As a result of a vision he became a hermit, set out for Italy, and settled near Pistoia. There he lived very ascetically with another monk, called Desiderius, who is also honoured as a saint.

Caimin (Cammin) of Inniskeltra March 24 March 25
+ 653. An ascetic who lived as a hermit on an island in Lough Derg in Ireland. Many disciples were attracted to him on account of his holiness. Later he founded a monastery and church on the island of the Seven Churches and worked with St Senan. A fragment of the Psalter of St Caimin, copied in his own hand, still exists.

Hermenland (Hermeland, Herbland, Erblon) March 25
+ c 720. Born near Noyon in France, he became a monk at Fontenelle. He was ordained priest and sent with twelve monks to establish a new monastery on the island of Aindre in the estuary of the Loire.

Humbert March 25
+ c 680. A disciple of St Amandus who helped found the monastery of Marolles in Belgium.

Irenaeus of Sirmium March 25
+ 304. Bishop in Pannonia (Hungary), he was martyred under Diocletian at Sirmium (Mitrovica).

Kennocha (Kyle, Enoch) March 25
+ 1007. A nun at a convent in Fife. She was held in great veneration in Scotland, especially around Glasgow.

Quirinus March 25
+ c 269. A martyr who suffered in Rome under Claudius II. He was one of those befriended and buried by Sts Marius, Martha and Companions.

Rome (Martyrs of) March 25
? A group of two hundred and sixty-two martyrs in Rome.

March 26

Bertilo March 26
+ c 878- 888. Abbot of St Benignus in Dijon in France. The Vikings sacked the monastery and martyred him and several of his monks at the altar.

Braulio March 26
+ 646. A monk at the monastery of St Engratia in Saragossa in Spain, he was ordained priest by his own brother, John, whom he succeeded as Archbishop of Saragossa.

Castulus March 26
+ 288. An officer of the palace in Rome of the Emperor Diocletian. He was tortured and buried alive for helping other Orthodox. A cemetery was named after his burial place on the Via Labicana.

Felicitas March 26
9th cent. A nun, probably at Sts Cosmas and Damian in Padua in Italy. Her relics are now at St Justina’s in Padua.

Felix of Trier March 26
+ c 400. Consecrated Bishop of Trier in Germany by St Martin of Tours in 386.

Garbhan March 26
7th cent. A saint who left his name to Dungarvan in Ireland.

Ludger March 26
+ 809. Born in Frisia, he returned to his homeland from England, but mainly preached in Westphalia of which he is the Apostle. His gentleness did more to attract the Saxons to Christ than all the brutal armies of Charlemagne. He lived for a time at Montecassino in Italy. He was the first Bishop of Münster in Germany.

Mochelloc (Cellog, Mottelog, Motalogus) March 26
+ c 639. Patron saint of Kilmallock in Limerick in Ireland.

Montanus and Maxima March 26
+ 304. Montanus, a priest, and Maxima, his wife, were drowned in the River Sava in Sirmium in Dalmatia or in Singidunum in Pannonia.

Peter, Marcian, Jovinus, Thecla, Cassian and Companions March 26
? Martyrs in Rome.

Sincheall March 26
5th cent. A disciple of St Patrick and founder of the monastery of Killeigh in Offaly in Ireland, where there were one hundred and fifty monks.

March 27

Alkeld (Athilda) March 27
10th cent. Two churches in Yorkshire in England are dedicated to this holy woman who was martyred by the Danes.

Amator (Amador) March 27
? A hermit to whom several churches are dedicated in Portugal

Augusta March 27
5th cent. Daughter of the Teuton Duke of Friuli. Her conversion to Christianity so enraged her father that he killed her with his own hands. She has been venerated from time immemorial in Serravalle near Treviso in the north of Italy.

Philetus, Lydia, Macedo, Theoprepius (Theoprepides), Amphilochius and Cronidas March 27
+ c 121. Martyrs in Illyria under Hadrian. Philetus was a senator, Lydia his wife, Macedo and Theoprepius their sons, Amphilochius a captain, and Cronidas a notary.

Romulus March 27
+ c 730. Abbot of St Baudilius near Nimes in France. About 720 he and his monks fled before the invading Saracens and settled in a ruined monastery in Saissy-les-Bois.

Rupert (Robert) March 27
+ c 717. Probably born in France, he became Bishop of Worms and began to spread Orthodoxy in the south of Germany. He started in Regensburg and pushed his way along the Danube. The Duke of Bavaria gave him the old ruined town of Iuvavum, which Rupert rebuilt and called Salzburg. Here he founded the monastery of St Peter and the convent of Nonnberg, where his sister Ermentrude was abbess. He is venerated as the first Archbishop of Salzburg and Apostle of Bavaria and Austria.

Suairlech March 27
+ c 750. First Bishop of Fore in Westmeath in Ireland from c 735 to c 750.

March 28

Conon March 28
+ 1236. A monk and abbot of the Greek monastery of Nesi in Sicily.

Gontram (Gunthrammus) March 28
+ 592. A repentant King of Burgundy in France. Having divorced his wife and ordered the execution of his doctor, he was overcome with remorse and lamented these sins for the rest of his life.

Gundelindis (Guendelindis) March 28
+ c 750. A daughter of the Duke of Alsace and niece of St Ottilia, whom she succeeded as Abbess of Niedermünster.

Rogatus, Successus and Companions March 28
? A group of eighteen martyrs in North Africa.

Sixtus III (Xystus) March 28
+ 440. Pope of Rome from 432. A Roman by birth, he is remembered for opposing Nestorianism and Pelagianism and restoring several Roman basilicas.

Spes March 28
+ c 513. An Abbot of Campi in central Italy. He was totally blind for forty years, but fifteen days before his repose his eyesight was restored.

Tutilo March 28
+ c 915. A gifted and artistic monk at St Gall in Switzerland.

March 29

Armogastes and Companions March 29
+ c 460. Armogastes and Saturus, high officers at the palace, suffered in North Africa during the Arian persecution under the Vandal King Genseric. First they were tortured, then sent to hard labour in the mines, finally condemned to slavery as cowherds near Carthage. They were not put to death ‘in case the Romans should venerate them as martyrs’.

Eustace (Eustasius) March 29
+ 625. A favourite disciple and monk of St Columbanus, whom he succeeded as second Abbot of Luxeuil in France. There were some six hundred monks there, many of whom became saints.

Firminus March 29
6th cent. Bishop of Viviers in France.

Gladys March 29
5th cent. A saint in Wales, she was married to St Gundleus and was the mother of St Cadoc.

Gwynllyw (Woollos) March 29
+ c 500. Husband of St Gladys, the father of St Cadoc, he ended his life as a hermit in Wales.

Lasar (Lassar, Lassera) March 29
6th cent. A nun in Ireland and niece of St Forchera.

Secundus March 29
+ 119. A noble from Asti in Piedmont in Italy and an officer in the imperial army. He was beheaded in Asti under Hadrian.

March 30

Clinius March 30
? A Greek monk at Montecassino in Italy. He became Abbot of St Peter’s near Pontecorvo, where his relics were venerated.

Fergus March 30
6th cent. Bishop of Downpatrick in Ireland.

Mamertinus March 30
+ c 462. A monk and then Abbot of Sts Cosmas and Damian in Auxerre in France.

Osburgh (Osburga) March 30
+ c 1018. First abbess of the convent founded by King Canute in Coventry in England.

Pastor March 30
6th cent. (?) Bishop of Orleans in France.

Patto (Pacificus) March 30
+ c 788. Perhaps born in Ireland, he went to Saxony, became abbot of a monastery there and finally became Bishop of Werden in Germany

Quirinus March 30
+ c 117. The jailer of Pope Alexander I, by whom he was converted with his daughter St Balbina. Shortly afterwards he was martyred in Rome under Hadrian.

Regulus (Rieul) March 30
+ c 260. By tradition a Greek, he is honoured as the first Bishop of Senlis in France. A tradition connects him with Arles where many Greeks lived.

Tola March 30
+ c 733. Abbot and Bishop of Disert Tola in Meath in Ireland.

Zosimus March 30
+ c 660. At the age of seven he was taken to the monastery of Santa Lucia near Syracuse in Sicily. After thirty years as a monk, he was successively made abbot and bishop of the city. He reposed at the age of ninety.

March 31

Aldo March 31
+ late 8th cent. Count of Ostrevant, he became a monk at the monastery of Hasnon in Belgium, which had been founded by his brother John. Aldo was chosen as second abbot.

Balbina March 31
+ c 130. By tradition the daughter of Quirinus the martyr, she was baptised by Pope Alexander and lived as a virgin in Rome. She was buried on the Appian Way near her father. Later her relics were enshrined in the church dedicated to her on the Aventine.

Guy (Guido) March 31
+ 1046. Born near Ravenna in Italy, Guy became a monk at the monastery of St Severus, where he became abbot. Later he went to the monastery of Pomposa near Ferrara.

Renovatus March 31
+ c 633. A convert from Arianism, he became monk and then Abbot of Cauliana in Lusitania. Finally he became Bishop of Merida in Spain for twenty-two years.

Theodulus, Anesius, Felix, Cornelia and Companions March 31
? Martyrs in North Africa.

APRIL 1-30

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

flamem

ORTHODOX SAINTS OF WESTERN EUROPE

 APRIL

Source:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/hp.php

ORTHODOX ENGLAND

April 1

Caidoc and Fricor (Adrian) Apr 1
7th cent. Born in Ireland, they preached Christ in the country of the Morini in the north of France. Their relics are still venerated in the parish church of Saint Riquier near Amiens.

Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach) Apr 1
9th cent. Archbishop of Armagh in Ireland, previously he had been Abbot of Iona in Scotland and founded the monastery of Kells.

Dodolinus Apr 1
7th cent. Bishop of Vienne in the Dauphiné in France.

Procopius July 4 (In the East Apr 1)
c 980-1053. Born in Czechia, he was ordained in Prague. Later he became a hermit and finally founded the monastery of Sazava.

Theodora Apr 1
+ c 120? The sister of St Hermes (Aug 28) whom she helped in prison and under torture. She was herself martyred some months later. Brother and sister were buried side by side.

Venantius Apr 1
+ c 255. A bishop in Dalmatia whose relics were brought from Spalato to Rome in 641.

Walericus (Valéry) Apr 1
+ c 622. A monk at Luxeuil in France, he later founded the monastery of Leuconay at the mouth of the Somme. Two towns in that area are named Saint-Valéry after him.

April 2

Abundius Apr 2
+ 469. Of Greek origin, he became Bishop of Como in the north of Italy. A theologian, he was sent to the Emperor Theodosius the Younger and encouraged the calling of the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

Bronach (Bromana) Apr 2
? Called the Virgin of Glen-Seichis, now Kilbronach in Ireland.

Constantine Apr 2
+ 874. Constantine II, King of Scotland, was slain in a battle against heathen invaders of his country and was honoured as a martyr. He was buried on Iona.

Drogo Apr 2
10th cent. After a worldly life, Drogo became a monk at Fleury-sur-Loire in France and afterwards at Baume-les-Messieurs.

Lonochilus (Longis, Lenogisil) and Agnofleda Apr 2
+ 653 and 638. The first was a priest who founded a monastery in Maine in France, Agnofleda was a holy virgin.

Musa Apr 2
+ 6th cent. A child in Rome who was granted visions. She was mentioned by her contemporary by St Gregory the Great.

Nicetius (Nizier) Apr 2
+ 573. He became Bishop of Lyons in France in 553 and was pastor for twenty years.

Rufus Apr 2
? A hermit at Glendalough in Ireland.

Urban of Langres Apr 2
+ c 390. Sixth Bishop of Langres in France from 374 on. In parts of Burgundy he was honoured as the patron-saint of vine dressers.

Victor Apr 2
+ 554. Bishop of Capua in the south of Italy and a Church writer.

April 3

Attala (Attalus) Apr 3
+ c 800. A monk and abbot of a monastery in Taormina in Sicily.

Burgundofara (or Fara) Apr 3 and Dec 7
+ 657. Blessed by St Columbanus as a child, she became a nun despite her father’s opposition, and so began the convent of Brige in France. This was later called Faremoutiers, i.e. Fara’s Monastery, where she was abbess for thirty-seven years.

Pancras (Pancratius) Apr 3
1st cent. Born in Antioch, he was consecrated by the Apostle Peter and sent to Taormina in Sicily where he was stoned to death.

Sixtus I (Xystus) Apr 3
+ c 125. Pope of Rome from 117 to c 125, sometimes referred to as a martyr.

April 4

Guier Apr 4
? A priest and hermit in Cornwall, where a church recalls his name.

Gwerir Apr 4
? A hermit near Liskeard in Cornwall, at whose grave King Alfred was healed of a serious illness. St Gwerir’s cell was later occupied by St Neot.

Hildebert Apr 4
+ 752. Abbot of St Peter in Ghent in Belgium. He was martyred by fanatics for defending the veneration of icons.

Isidore of Seville Apr 4
c 560-636. Born in Cartagena in Spain, he was the brother of Sts Leander, Fulgentius and Florentina. He succeeded St Leander as Bishop of Seville in 600. He presided over several Councils, reorganised the Spanish Church, encouraged monastic life, completed the Mozarabic rite, was an encyclopedic writer and was also responsible for the Council of Toledo in 633.

Tigernach (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry) Apr 4
+ 549. Abbot of Clones, he succeeded St Macartin as Bishop at Clogher in Ireland.

April 5

Africa, Martyrs of North-West Africa Apr 5
+ 459. A large group martyred at the Easter liturgy by Genseric, the Arian King of the Vandals. The reader who was singing the Alleluia had his throat pierced by an arrow.

Becan (Began) Apr 5
6th cent. One of the ‘Twelve Apostles of Ireland’. He was related to St Columba and founded a monastery in Kill-Beggan in Westmeath. He also gave his name to the church and parish of Imleach-Becain in Meath.

Derfel-Gadarn Apr 5
6th cent. A soldier and afterwards a hermit in Llanderfel in Gwynedd in Wales.

April 6

Berthanc (Berchan) Apr 6
+ c 840. A monk at Iona in Scotland and later Bishop of Kirkwall in the Orkneys. He seems to have died in Ireland and been buried at Inishmore in Galway Bay.

Brychan Apr 6
? A King in Wales with twenty-four saintly children.

Celestine April 6 (In the East April 8)
+ 432. Born in the Campagna in Italy, he succeeded Boniface I as Pope of Rome in 422. He supported St Germanus of Auxerre against Pelagianism and condemned Nestorianism.

Elstan Apr 6
+ 981. A monk at Abingdon in England with St Ethelwold, he was celebrated as a model of obedience. He became Bishop of Ramsbury and succeeded St Ethelwold as Abbot of Abingdon.

Florentius, Geminianus and Saturus Apr 6
? 4th cent. Martyrs in Sirmium in Pannonia.

Gennard Apr 6
+ 720. A monk at Fontenelle in France and eventually Abbot of Flay.

Marcellinus Apr 6
+ 413. Marcellinus was the imperial representative in North Africa at the time of the Donatist heresy. He and his brother, the judge Agrarius, tried to enforce the decisions of a conference in Carthage against Donatism, but the Donatists resorted to false accusation and the two brothers were martyred.

Notker Balbulus Apr 6
c 840-912. Nicknamed Balbulus, i.e. the Stammerer. He was born near Zurich in Switzerland and when still a child entered the monastery of St Gall where he spent his whole life, excelling as a musician

Prudentius Galindo Apr 6
+ 861. Born in Spain, in his youth he fled from the Saracens to France, where he changed his baptismal name Galindo to Prudentius. He became Bishop of Troyes.

Rufina, Moderata, Romana, Secundus and Seven Companions Apr 6
? 4th cent. Martyrs at Sirmium in Pannonia.

Ulched (Ulchad, Ylched) Apr 6
? A holy man who gave his name to Llechulched in Anglesey in Wales.

Urban Apr 6
+ c 940. Abbot of the Monastery of Peñalba near Astorga in Spain.

Winebald (Vinebaud) Apr 6
+ c 650. A monk at Saint-Loup-de-Troyes in France where he became abbot.

April 7

Brynach (Bemach, Bemacus) Apr 7
? 5th cent. He built a cell and church at a place called Carn-Englyi (Mountain of the Angels), overhanging Nefyn in Gwynedd in Wales.

Epiphanius, Donatus, Rufinus and Companions Apr 7
? Thirteen martyrs, of whom Epiphanius was a bishop in North Africa.

Finan (Finnian) Apr 7
6th cent. Born in Munster in Ireland, he was a disciple of St Brendan. He founded a monastery at Kinnitty in Offaly of which he is the patron.

Gibardus Apr 7
+ c 888. Abbot of Luxeuil in France during the invasion of the Huns. He and his monks fled from the monastery but the barbarians found them and martyred them.

Goran (Woranus) Apr 7
6th cent. He lived at Bodmin before St Petroc and several churches are dedicated to him in Cornwall.

Hegesippus Apr 7
+ c 180. A Jew born in Jerusalem, he spent twenty years of his life in Rome. He is considered to be the father of Church History but only a few chapters of his work remain.

Llewellyn (LLywelyn) and Gwrnerth Apr 7
6th cent. Monks from Wales who lived in Welshpool and later on Bardsey.

Saturninus Apr 7
4th cent. Bishop of Verona in Italy.

April 8

Amantius Apr 8
+ 440. Successor of St Provinus in Como in Italy.

Celestine April 6 (In the East April 8)
+ 432. Born in the Campagna in Italy, he succeeded Boniface I as Pope of Rome in 422. He supported St Germanus of Auxerre against Pelagianism and condemned Nestorianism.

Concessa Apr 8
? A martyr venerated from early times in Carthage in North Africa.

Januarius, Maxima and Macaria Apr 8
? Martyrs in North Africa.

Perpetuus Apr 8
+ c 490. Bishop of Tours in France (c 460-490).

Redemptus Apr 8
+ 586. Bishop of Ferentini in Italy.

April 9

Africa, Martyrs of North-West Africa Apr 9
A group of Christians martyred in Masyla.

Casilda Apr 9
+ c 1050. Born in Toledo, she was of Moorish parentage. She became Orthodox and led the life of an anchoress near Briviesca near Burgos. She was greatly venerated throughout Spain.

Dotto Apr 9
? 6th cent. Abbot of a monastery in the Orkney Islands off the coast of Scotland.

Hedda and Companions Apr 9
+ c 869. Hedda was the Abbot of Peterborough in England. He and eighty-four monks of his monastery were martyred by the Danes.

Hugh of Rouen Apr 9
+ 730. He became a monk at a very early age, either at Fontenelle or at Jumièges in the north of France. He became Bishop of Rouen and then of Paris and was also Abbot of Fontenelle and Jumièges. He reposed at Jumièges as a simple monk.

Madrun (Materiana) Apr 9
5th cent. A saint from Wales or Cornwall to whom some Welsh churches are dedicated.

Marcellus Apr 9
+ 474. Born in Avignon in France, he succeeded his own brother St Petronius as Bishop of Die. He suffered much from the Arians.

Pannonia (Martyrs of) Apr 9
? Seven virgin-martyrs in Sirmium in Pannonia.

Theodore and Companions Apr 9
+ 869. Theodore was Abbot of Crowland in England and he and his monks were martyred by the Danes. Besides the abbot, several others were mentioned by name: Askega and Swethin, Elfgete, a deacon, Sabinus, a subdeacon, Egdred and Ulric, and also Grimkeld and Agamund, both centenarians.

Waldetrudis (Vaudru) Apr 9
+ c 688. Daughter of Sts Walbert and Bertilia, wife of St Vincent Madelgarus and mother of Sts Landericus, Dentelin, Madalberta and Aldetrudis. When her husband became a monk she founded a convent and became a nun. The town of Mons in Belgium grew up around the convent.

April 10

Bede the Younger Apr 10
+ 883. A court official, he became a monk at the monastery of Gavello near Rovigo in the north of Italy. He refused to become a bishop.

Beocca, Ethor and Companions Apr 10
+ 869. In their onslaught on England, the Danes attacked monasteries in particular. They martyred Sts Beocca, Abbot, Ethor, monk-priest and some ninety monks at Chertsey in Surrey; at Peterborough they martyred St Hedda, Abbot, and others at his monastery; at Thorney, St Torthred and others.

Macarius of Antioch Apr 10
+ 1012. Born in Antioch, he was a bishop who travelled westwards as a pilgrim and was received by monks at the monastery of St Bavo in Ghent in Belgium.

Palladius Apr 10
+ 661. Abbot of St Germanus in Auxerre in France, he became bishop there and founded several monasteries.

Rome (Martyrs of) Apr 10
+ c 115. A number of criminals baptised by Pope Alexander during his imprisonment. They were taken to Ostia near Rome and put on board a boat which was then scuttled.

Terence, Africanus, Pompeius and Companions Apr 10
+ 250. A group of fifty martyrs, imprisoned with snakes and scorpions and finally beheaded in Carthage in North Africa under Decius.

April 11

Agericus (Aguy, Airy) Apr 11
+ c 680. A disciple of St Eligius (Eloi) who became Abbot of St Martin’s in Tours in France.

Domnio and Companions Apr 11
? One of the first to enlighten Dalmatia, where he was martyred as first Bishop of Salona, probably during the persecution of Diocletian.

Godebertha Apr 11
+ c 700. Born near Amiens in France, in 657 she became a nun at Noyon and was the first abbess of the convent founded there.

Guthlac Apr 11
673-714. From being a warrior in the army of Ethelred, King of Mercia, Guthlac became a monk at Repton in England. Afterwards he went to live as a hermit in the fens, where he spent the last fifteen years of his life like a desert-father. Later the monastery of Crowland grew up at the place where he had lived.

Isaac Apr 11
+ c 550. A Syrian monk who fled from the Monophysite persecution and founded a monastery in Monteluco near Spoleto. He was one of the restorers of ascetic life in 6th century Italy.

Machai Apr 11
5th cent. A disciple of St Patrick who founded a monastery on the Isle of Bute in Scotland.

Maedhog (Aedhan, Mogue) Apr 11
6th cent. An abbot whose main monastery was Clonmore in Ireland.

April 12

Alferius, (Alpherius, Adalfericus) Apr 12
930-1050. A Norman by origin, he was born in Salerno. Sent as an ambassador to France, there he fell ill and became a monk. The Duke of Salerno asked for his return and Alferius settled at Mt Fenestra near Salerno. There he founded the monastery of La Cava which became very influential in the south of Italy.

Constantine Apr 12
+ 529. The first Bishop of Gap in France.

Damian Apr 12
+ 710. Bishop of Pavia in Lombardy in Italy, he vigorously opposed Monothelitism.

Erkemboden Apr 12
+ 714. A monk at Sithin in Saint-Omer in France, who succeeded the founder, St Bertinus, as abbot. Later he was Bishop of Thérouanne for twenty-six years.

Julius I Apr 12
+ 352. Pope of Rome from 337 to 352. He defended St Athanasius against his Arian accusers and also built many churches.

Tetricus Apr 12
+ 707. Abbot of the monastery of St Germanus in Auxerre in France who then became Bishop of Auxerre by popular acclamation. He was murdered in his sleep.

Victor Apr 12
+ c 300. A catechumen martyred in Braga in Portugal under Diocletian, thus baptised in his own blood.

Vissia Apr 12
+ c 250. A virgin-martyr in Fermo near Ancona in Italy under Decius.

Wigbert Apr 12
+ 690. Born in England, he became a disciple of St Egbert in Ireland. He spent two years in Friesland in Holland but later returned to Ireland.

Zeno April 12
+ 371 Born in North Africa, he became Bishop of Verona in Italy at the time of Julian the Apostate. He was remembered as a fervent pastor and a fierce opponent of Arianism.

April 13

Guinoc Apr 13
+ c 838. A bishop in Scotland.

Hermenegild Apr 13
+ 586. Son of the Visigothic King of Spain, Leovigild, he was brought up as an Arian in Seville. He became Orthodox on his marriage to the daughter of Sigebert of Austrasia, at which his father disinherited him. Hermenegild rose up in arms, was defeated, captured and refusing to give up his Faith, was martyred at the instigation of his stepmother.

Martin I Apr 13 (In the East Apr 14)
+ 655. Born in Umbria, he was elected Pope of Rome in 649. He called a Council at once and condemned Monothelitism. Imperial wrath fell on him and in 653 he was deported to Naxos in the Aegean. The following year he was condemned to death at a mock trial and finally taken as a prisoner to the Chersonese where he died of starvation.

Martius Apr 13
+ c 530. Born in Auvergne in France, he lived an ascetic life on a mountainside and later built a monastery for his disciples.

Ursus Apr 13
+ 396. Born in a noble family in Sicily, he converted and fled from his father’s wrath to Ravenna in Italy, where he became bishop in 378.

April 14

Abundius Apr 14
+ c 564. A sacrist at St Peter’s in Rome.

Domnina and Companions Apr 14
69 ? A virgin martyred in Terni in Italy at the same time as Bishop Valentine.

Lambert of Lyons Apr 14
+ 688. Born in the north of France, he became a monk at Fontenelle with St Wandrille whom he succeeded as abbot in 666. In 678 he became Bishop of Lyons.

Martin I Apr 13 (In the East Apr 14)
+ 655. Born in Umbria, he was elected Pope of Rome in 649. He called a Council at once and condemned Monothelitism. Imperial wrath fell on him and in 653 he was deported to Naxos in the Aegean. The following year he was condemned to death at a mock trial and finally taken as a prisoner to the Chersonese where he died of starvation.

Tassach Apr 14
+ c 495? One of St Patrick’s earliest disciples and first Bishop of Raholp in Ireland.

Tiburtius, Valerian and Maximus Apr 14
3rd century? Martyrs in Rome.

April 15

Anastasia and Basilissa (Vasilissa) Apr 15
+ c 68. Noble Roman ladies, disciples of the Apostles Peter and Paul, whose bodies they buried. They were martyred under Nero.

Eutychius Apr 15
? A martyr in Ferentino in Italy.

Hunna Apr 15
+ 679. The self-sacrificing wife of a nobleman in Alsace, now in France.

Laurentinus Sossius Apr 15
+ 485. A boy aged five, martyred on Good Friday in Valrovina near Vicenza in Italy.

Maro, Eutyches and Victorinus Apr 15
+ c 99. They belonged to the circle of Flavia Domitilla, whom they accompanied in exile to the island of Ponza. Eventually they returned to Rome and were martyred under Trajan.

Mundus (Munde, Mund, Mond) Apr 15
+ c 962. An abbot who founded several monasteries in Argyle in Scotland.

Nidger (Nidgar, Nitgar) Apr 15
+ c 829. Abbot of Ottobeuren in Bavaria. He became Bishop of Augsburg in Germany.

Paternus (Padarn) Apr 15
5th-6th cent. Together with others he founded the monastery of Llanbadarn Fawr (i.e. the great monastery of Padarn) near Aberystwyth in Wales. He preached the Gospel there.

Paternus (Pern) Apr 15
+ c 500. Bishop of Vannes in Brittany.

Ruadan (Ruadhan, Rodan) Apr 15
+ 584. One of the leading disciples of St Finian of Clonard, he founded the monastery of Lothra in Ireland.

Silvester Apr 15
+ c 625. Second Abbot of Moutier-Saint-Jean (Réome) near Dijon in France.

April 16

Elias Apr 16
+ 1042. Born in Ireland, he became monk and abbot in 1020 of the Irish monasteries of St Martin the Great and St Pantaleon in Cologne in Germany.

Encratia (Encratis, Encratide, Engracia) Apr 16
+ ? 304. A virgin who suffered terribly for Orthodoxy in Saragossa in Spain, where a church dedicated to her now exists. She was famous for ‘her ardour in suffering for Christ’. Though counted a martyr, she outlived her torments.

Fructuosus Apr 16
+ 665. Born in Spain, he became a monk and then a hermit in the Vierzo Mountains, where disciples gathered around him. Fructuosus was eventually forced to become Bishop of Dumium and later Archbishop of Braga.

Herveus (Hervé) of Tours Apr 16
+ 1021. Born in Touraine in France, he became a monk at the monastery of St Martin of Tours and lived as a hermit.

Lambert of Saragossa Apr 16
+ c 900. A servant who was martyred near Saragossa in Spain by his Saracen master.

Paternus (Pair) Apr 16 and Sept 23
+ c 574 (or 563). Born in Poitiers in France, he became a monk at Ansion and later a hermit near Coutances. Eventually he became Bishop of Avranches.

Saragossa, The Eighteen Martyrs: Optatus, Lupercus, Successus, Martial, Urban, Julia, Quintilian, Publius, Fronto, Felix, Caecilian, Eventius, Primitivus, Apodemius and four named Saturninus Apr 16
+ c 304. Martyrs in Saragossa in Spain under Diocletian and the prefect Dacian. Prudentius, who lived in Saragossa a lifetime later, described their martyrdom.

Turibius of Astorga Apr 16
+ c 460. Bishop of Astorga in Spain and a valiant defender of Orthodoxy.

Turibius of Palencia Apr 16
+ c 528. Founder of the monastery of Liébana in Asturias in Spain.

Vasius (Vaise, Vaize) Apr 16
+ c 500. A rich citizen of Saintes in France, murdered by his relatives for giving his property to the poor.

April 17

Agapitus I Sept 20 and April 22 (In the East Apr 17)
+ 536. Born in Rome, he was elected Pope of Rome in May 535 and reposed in Constantinople on April 22 536. As Pope he showed great strength of character in opposing Monophysitism. His relics were brought back to Rome on Sept 20, when he was commemorated a second time.

Anicetus Apr 17
+ 166. A Syrian by descent, he was Bishop of Rome from about 152 till 166. During this period St Polycarp of Smyrna visited Rome to settle with him the question of the date of Easter. Anicetus took a firm stand against the Gnostics and may have been martyred.

Donnan (Dounan) and Companions Apr 17
+ 618. St Donnan was a monk at Iona with St Columba and founded a monastery on the Island of Eigg in the Inner Hebrides, off the west coast of Scotland. He and his fifty-two monks were massacred by heathen raiders on Easter Sunday 618.

Elias, Paul and Isidore Apr 17
+ 856. Elias, a priest in Cordoba, was martyred in his old age by the Moors, together with Sts Paul and Isidore, two of his spiritual children. An eyewitness, St Eulogius, wrote an account of their martyrdom.

Fortunatus and Marcian Apr 17
? Martyrs, perhaps in Antioch, but more probably in North Africa.

Innocent of Tortona Apr 17
+ c 350. A confessor under Diocletian, he was scourged and just escaped death. He was later ordained priest and became Bishop of Tortona in Italy (c 326).

Landericus (Landry) Apr 17
7th cent. The eldest son of Sts Madelgarus and Waldetrudis. From 641 to 650 he was Bishop of Meaux in France, but on the repose of his father he succeeded him as Abbot of Soignies.

Mappalicus and Companions Apr 17
+ 250. Martyrs in Carthage in North Africa under Decius.

Pantagathus Apr 17
475-540. A courtier who later became Bishop of Vienne in France.

Villicus Apr 17
+ 568. A very virtuous Bishop of Metz in France 543-568.

Wando (Vando) Apr 17
+ c 756. A monk and Abbot of Fontenelle in France. As a result of a false accusation he was exiled to Troyes but was reinstated after his innocence had been proved.

April 18

Agia (Aia, Austregildis, Aye) Apr 18
+ c 714. Wife of St Hidulf of Hainault in Belgium. Both desired the monastic life and she entered the convent in Mons.

Apollonius the Apologist Apr 18
+ c 190. A Roman senator, denounced as a Christian by one of his own slaves and condemned to be beheaded. His eloquent defence of Orthodoxy, delivered before the Senate at his trial is a priceless document of the Faith.

Bitheus and Genocus Apr 18
6th cent. Two monks from Britain who accompanied St Finian of Clonard to Ireland and gained a reputation for holiness.

Calocerus Apr 18
? An officer of the Emperor Hadrian martyred in Brescia in Italy.

Cogitosus Apr 18
? 8th cent. A monk at Kildare in Ireland who probably wrote the Life of St Brigid.

Corebus Apr 18
c 117-138. A prefect of Messina in Sicily, converted to Christ by St Eleutherius and martyred under the Emperor Hadrian.

Deicola (Dicul) April 18
Late 7th cent. Born in Ireland, he preached Christ in England in Norfolk and in Sussex. Dickleburgh in Norfolk may be named after him.

Eleutherius and Anthia Apr 18
+ 117-138. Eleutherius, Bishop of Illyria, his mother Anthia and eleven others were martyred in Illyria under Hadrian.

Laserian (Molaisse) Apr 18
+ 639. He founded the monastery and bishopric of Leighlin in Ireland.

Perfectus Apr 18
+ 851 A priest in Cordoba in Spain, martyred by Muslims on Easter Sunday.

Wicterp (Wiho, Wicho) Apr 18
+ 749. Abbot of Ellwangen in Germany. He helped found monasteries at Fussen, Wessobrunn and Kempten, all of which became famous. He later became the tenth Bishop of Augsburg.

April 19

Alphege the Martyr Apr 19
954-1012. A monk at Deerhurst in Gloucestershire in England, then Abbot of Bath, he became Bishop of Winchester in 984 and thirtieth Archbishop of Canterbury in 1005. He was greatly loved by his flock and during the Danish invasion of 1011 he was urged to pay a ransom. He refused, was taken prisoner and martyred in Greenwich, the only Orthodox Archbishop of Canterbury to be martyred. His relics were enshrined in St Paul’s in London and later in Canterbury.

Crescentius Apr 19
+ c 396. A subdeacon in Florence in Italy and a disciple of St Zenobius and St Ambrose.

Gerold Apr 19
+ 978. Of the family of the Counts of Saxony in Germany, he donated his land to the monastery of Einsiedeln in Swizerland where his two sons, Cuno and Ulric, were monks. He went to live as a hermit at a village near Mitternach.

Ursmar Apr 19
+ 713. Abbot-bishop of the Monastery of Lobbes on the Sambre and founder of Aulne and Wallers, also in present-day Belgium. His work as a bishop in Flanders was of great importance.

Vincent of Collioure Apr 19
+ c 304. A martyr in Collioure in Languedoc in the south of France under Diocletian.

April 20

Ceadwalla (Cadwalla) Apr 20
+ 689. A King of Wessex in England, he was a cruel and cunning pagan. He was converted and went to Rome, where he was baptised by Pope Sergius and died in the white robe of baptism.

Gundebert Apr 20
8th cent. He married St Bertha and was the brother of St Nivard. He separated from his wife, became a monk, went to Ireland and was martyred there by heathen.

Harduin Apr 20
+ 811. Born near Rouen he became a monk at Fontenelle in France (749). After a time he went to live as a hermit nearby and copied writings of the Fathers.

Hugh of Anzy-le-Duc Apr 20
+ c 930. Born in Poitiers in France, he became a monk at Saint Savin. Later he restored monastic life in several monasteries. He reposed at Anzy-le-Duc.

Marcellinus, Vincent and Domninus Apr 20
+ c 374. Born in North Africa, they went to France and preached in the Dauphiné. St Marcellinus was consecrated first Bishop of Embrun by St Eusebius of Vercelli. The relics of the three saints are venerated in Digne in the Alps.

Marcian of Auxerre Apr 20
+ c 470. Born in Bourges in France, he became a monk at the monastery of Sts Cosmas and Damian in Auxerre.

Sulpicius and Servilian Apr 20
+ c 117. Martyrs in Rome who were beheaded under Trajan.

April 21

Beuno Apr 21
+ c 640. Born in Wales, he founded monasteries at Llanfeuno in Herefordshire and Llanymynech. His name is chiefly connected with Clynnog Fawr in Gwynedd.

Cyprian Apr 21
+ 582. Bishop of Brescia in Italy. His relics are enshrined in the church of San Pietro in Oliveto in Brescia.

Frodulphus (Frou) Apr 21
+ c 750. A disciple of St Medericus (Merry), he became a monk at St Martin’s in Autun in France, from where he was driven by the Saracens and he settled in Barjon.

Maelrubius (Maolrubha) Apr 21
+ c 724. A monk at St Comgall’s monastery at Bangor, who went to Iona. He afterwards founded a church at Applecross on the north-west coast of Scotland.

April 22

Agapitus I Sept 20 and April 22 (In the East Apr 17)
+ 536. Born in Rome, he was elected Pope of Rome in May 535 and reposed in Constantinople on April 22 536. As Pope he showed great strength of character in opposing Monophysitism. His relics were brought back to Rome on Sept 20, when he was commemorated a second time.

Arwald Apr 22
+ 686. Two brothers, sons of Arwald, a prince in the Isle of Wight, whose proper names are lost. They were put to death by soldiers of King Ceadwalla, then a  pagan, on the day after their baptism.

Clement Nov 23 (In the East Jan 4, Apr 22, Sept 10 and Nov 25)
+ c 101. One of the Seventy Apostles, he was the third Pope of Rome. Consecrated by the Apostle Peter, he is mentioned in Philippians 4,3 and wrote a letter to the Church of Corinth which still exists. He is venerated as a martyr and he is remembered in Rome by the church of San Clemente, which may have been built on the site of his home.

Epipodius and Alexander Apr 22
+ 178. Two young friends and citizens of Lyons in France, martyred under Marcus Aurelius. St Epipodius was beheaded. St Alexander is also commemorated on April 24.

Gaius Apr 22 (In the East Aug 11)
+ 296. Born in Dalmatia, he became Pope of Rome and was martyred with members of his family.

Leo of Sens Apr 22
+ 541. Bishop of Sens in France for twenty-three years.

Opportuna Apr 22
+ c 770. Born near Ayesmes in the north of France, she was the sister of St Chrodegang, Bishop of Séez. At an early age she became a nun at the convent of Monteuil, of which she became abbess. She was described as ‘a true mother to all her nuns’.

Senorina Apr 22
+ 982. She was related to St Rudesind of Mondoñedo. Entrusted to the care of her aunt, Abbess Godina at the convent of St John of Venaria (Vieyra), she later became its abbess. As such she moved the convent to Basto near Braga in Portugal.

Soter Apr 22
+ c 174. Like most Orthodox in Rome at this time, he was a Greek. He became Pope and corresponded with the Church of Corinth and traditionally he is regarded as a martyr.

April 23

Adalbert (Voitech) Apr 23
956-997. Born in Czechia, he became Bishop of Prague (983). Disheartened, he went to Rome and became a monk. Twice he returned to his former mission and twice he had to abandon it. On each occasion he preached in Poland, Prussia and Hungary. He was martyred by the Prussians near Danzig.

Felix, Fortunatus and Achilleus Apr 23
+ 212. St Felix, a priest, and his two deacons, Fortunatus and Achilleus, were sent by St Irenaeus of Lyons to enlighten the area around Vienne in France, where they were martyred.

Gerard of Toul Apr 23
+ 994. Born in Cologne in Germany, he became Bishop of Toul in France in 963. He rebuilt the Cathedral and established monasteries with both Greek and Irish monks for the furtherance of the Orthodox Faith.

Ibar (Iberius, Ivor) Apr 23
5th cent. One of those who like Sts Kiaran, Ailbe and Declan enlightened Ireland. He mainly preached in Leinster and Meath.

Marolus Apr 23
+ 423. A Syrian by origin, he became Bishop of Milan in Italy in 408.

Pusinna Apr 23
5th-6th cent. A holy virgin in Champagne in France who had six sisters, all widely honoured as saints.

April 24

Alexander and Companions Apr 24
+ 178. A Greek by birth and the friend and companion of St Epipodius of Lyons in France. He was arrested and martyred with thirty-four others.

Authaire (Oye) Apr 24
7th cent. A courtier at the palace of King Dagobert I of France and father of St Ouen of Rouen. He is the patron-saint of the village of La-Ferté-sous-Jouarre where he lived.

Bova and Doda Apr 24
7th cent. St Bova was a sister and St Doda a niece of St Balderic (Baudry), who founded Montfaucon and the convent of St Peter in Rheims in France. Bova was the first abbess and was succeeded by Doda.

Deodatus (Dié) Apr 24
+ c 525. A hermit near Blois in France. Later the town of Saint-Dié grew up around his cell.

Dyfnan Apr 24
5th cent. Born in Wales, he founded a church in Anglesey.

Egbert Apr 24
+ 729. A monk at Lindisfarne in England, he moved to Ireland and lived at Rathelmigisi in Connaught. Here he prepared several monks to preach the Gospel in Germany. He went to Iona in Scotland and persuaded the monks to adopt the Orthodox date for Easter.

Gregory of Elvira Apr 24
+ c 394. Bishop of Elvira in the south of Spain. He was one of the champions of Orthodoxy against Arianism and one of the few bishops who at Rimini in 359 consistently refused to compromise with them.

Honorius of Brescia Apr 24
+ c 586. A hermit near Brescia in Italy who was chosen bishop of that city (c 577).

Ivo Apr 24
? According to tradition he was a Persian bishop who became a hermit in Huntingdonshire in England. St Ives in Huntingdonshire is called after him.

Mellitus Apr 24
+ 624. Abbot of St Andrew’s on the Coelian Hill in Rome, he was sent by St Gregory the Great to England in 601. He spent three years in Kent, and then became Bishop of London. He was exiled to France for refusing to give communion to apostates. In 619 he was recalled to Kent to succeed St Laurence as third Archbishop of Canterbury.

Sabas and Companions Apr 24
+ 272. An officer of Gothic descent, martyred with seventy companions in Rome under Aurelian.

April 25

Erminus Apr 25
+ 737. Born in Laon in France, he became a monk at Lobbes in Belgium and later abbot and bishop.

Evodius, Hermogenes and Callista Apr 25
? By tradition martyrs in Syracuse in Sicily.

Heribaldus Apr 25
+ c 857. Monk and abbot of the monastery of St Germanus in Auxerre in France and later bishop of the same city.

Macaille Apr 25
+ c 489. A disciple of Mel who became Bishop of Croghan in Offaly in Ireland.

Mella Apr 25
+ c 780. Born in Connaught in Ireland, Mella was the mother of two saints, Cannech and Tigernach. After the death of her husband, she became a nun and Abbess of Doire-Melle.

Phaebadius (Fiari) Apr 25
+ c 392. A bishop of Agen in the south of France who succeeded in stamping out Arianism in Gaul, together with his friend St Hilary of Poitiers. He was one of the best known bishops of his time and presided over several Councils.

Robert of Syracuse Apr 25
+ c 1000. Abbot of a monastery in Syracuse in Sicily.

April 26

Clarentius Apr 26
+ c 620. The successor of St Etherius as Bishop of Vienne in France.

Exuperantia Apr 26
? A saint whose relics are venerated in Troyes in France.

Lucidius Apr 26
? Bishop of Verona in Italy.

Marcellinus Apr 26 (In the East June 7)
+ 304. A Pope of Rome, who may have been martyred in repentance for his previous errors.

Peter of Braga Apr 26
? First Bishop and martyr of Braga in Portugal.

Richarius (Riquier) Apr 26
+ c 645. Born at Centula (Celles) near Amiens in the north of France, he became a priest and founded a monastery in his native village, later called Saint-Riquier after him,. He was the first to devote himself to the work of ransoming captives and reposed a hermit.

Trudpert Apr 26
+ c ? 644. A hermit, possibly from Ireland, who lived in Münstethal in Germany. He may later have been murdered. The monastery of St Trudpert was built on the site.

April 27

Asicus (Ascicus,Tassach) Apr 27
+ c 490. One of the earliest disciples of St Patrick, who put him at the head of the monastery and diocese of Elphin in Ireland, where he is venerated as patron-saint. He excelled as a coppersmith and some examples of his work still exist.

Enoder (Cynidr, Kenedr, Quidic) Apr 27
6th cent. Llangynidr in Powys in Wales is named after him, as also St Enoder or Enodoc in Cornwall and Kenderchurch in Herefordshire in England.

Floribert Apr 27
+ 746. Bishop of Liège in Belgium.

Liberalis Apr 27
+ c 400. A priest from the area near Ancona in Italy, he worked for the conversion of the Arians and suffered much at their hands. His relics are enshrined at Treviso.

Tertullian Apr 27
+ c 490. Eighth Bishop of Bologna in Italy.

Theophilus Apr 27
+ c 427. Bishop of Brescia in Italy and the successor of St Gaudentius.

Winewald Apr 27
+ c 731. The successor of St Berchtun as Abbot of Beverley in England.

April 28

Adalbero Apr 28
+ 909. Uncle of St Ulric, he became a monk in 850 and then Abbot of Ellwangen in Germany. He restored the monastery of Lorsch and became Bishop of Augsburg.

Aphrodisius, Caralippus, Agapius and Eusebius Apr 28
? Early martyrs in Languedoc in France. Their story is told by Gregory of Tours.

Artemius Apr 28
+ 609. Born in Sens in France, he became bishop there. He called to public penance a Spaniard named Baldus (in French Bond) who became a spiritual son and who was also venerated as a saint.

Cronan of Roscrea Apr 28
+ c 626. Born in Munster, he founded several monasteries in various parts of Ireland, especially Roscrea.

Gerard Apr 28
639? By tradition he was one of four pilgrims from England – the other three were Ardwine, Bernard and Hugh – they all reposed in Galinaro in the south of Italy.

Mark of Galilee Apr 28
+ 92. By tradition, a Galilean and the first bishop, and also martyr, of the Abruzzi in Italy.

Pamphilus Apr 28
+ c 700. Bishop of Sulmona and Corfinium in the Abruzzi in Italy.

Pollio Apr 28
+ c 304. A reader of the church of Cybalae in Pannonia, burnt alive under Diocletian.

Prudentius Apr 28
+ c 700. Born in Armentia in Spain, he became a hermit, was ordained priest and became Bishop of Tarazona in Aragon.

Valeria Apr 28
? 1st cent. An early martyr in Milan in Italy.

April 29

Agapius and Companions Apr 29
c 259. Born in Spain, Agapius and Secundinus, bishops or priests, were exiled to Cirta in Numidia in North Africa in the persecution under Valerian. There they suffered martyrdom together with Tertulla and Antonia, virgins, and a certain woman with her twin children.

Ava (Avia) Apr 29
+ c 845. A niece of King Pepin, in her childhood and youth she was blind, but she was miraculously healed by St Rainfredis. She became a nun at Denain in Hainault, now in Belgium, where she became abbess.

Daniel Apr 29
9th cent. Born in Asia Minor, he became a hermit and was martyred in Spain.

Dictinus Apr 29
5th cent. The first convert of St Patrick in Ulster in Ireland. He was originally a swineherd. After his conversion he continued to the end faithful to Christ.

Endellion Apr 29
? 6th cent. Probably born in Cornwall, she was the sister of St Nectan of Hartland. Part of her shrine in St Endellion in Cornwall still exists.

Fiachan (Fianchine) Apr 29
7th cent. Born in Munster in Ireland, he was a monk at Lismore and a disciple of St Carthage the Younger.

Paulinus of Brescia Apr 29
+ c 545. Bishop of Brescia in Italy (c 524-545). His relics are enshrined in the church of San Pietro in Oliveto.

Senan Apr 29
7th cent. A hermit in the north of Wales.

Severus Apr 29
+ 409. Bishop of Naples in Italy and a famous wonderworker. He raised a dead man to life so that he bear witness in favour of his persecuted widow.

Torpes Apr 29
+ c 65. A martyr in Pisa in Italy under Nero.

Wilfrid the Younger Apr 29
+ 744. A monk and favourite disciple of St John of Beverley in England, whom he succeeded. Before his repose he lived at the monastery at Ripon.

April 30

Amator, Peter and Louis Apr 30
+ 855. Amator was born in Martos near Cordoba in Spain, where he was ordained priest. Together with a monk, Peter by name, and a layman called Louis, he was martyred by the Saracens for publicly confessing Christ.

Cynwl Apr 30
6th cent. The brother of St Deiniol, first Bishop of Bangor. He lived an ascetic life in the north of Wales and several churches were dedicated to him.

Desideratus Apr 30
+ c 569. A hermit who lived in Gourdon near Châlon-sur-Saône in France.

Erconwald (Erkenwald) Apr 30
+ 693. Of noble origin in the east of England, he founded a monastery in Chertsey and a convent in Barking. He became abbot of the former and his sister St Ethelburgh the abbess of the latter. In 675 he became Bishop of London. His shrine at St Paul’s became a centre of veneration and he was called ‘The Light of London’.

Eutropius Apr 30
c 250? One of the companions of St Dionysius of Paris. He is honoured as the first Bishop of Saintes and martyr.

Forannan Apr 30
+ 982. Born in Ireland, he went to the monastery of Waulsort on the Meuse in Belgium and became a monk and in 962 abbot.

Laurence of Novara and Companions Apr 30
+ c 397. He helped St Gaudentius, Bishop of Novara, in Piedmont in Italy. He was martyred with a group of children whom he was instructing.

Marianus, James and Companions Apr 30
+ 259. Martyrs in Lambesa, an ancient town in Numidia in North Africa. Marianus was a reader and James a deacon.

Pomponius Apr 30
+ 536. Bishop of Naples in Italy (508-536). He was a strong opponent of Arianism.

Sophia Apr 30
+ c 250. A virgin from Fermo in central Italy martyred under Decius.

Swithbert the Younger Apr 30
+ 807. Born in England, he joined the missionaries in Germany and became Bishop of Werden in Westphalia.

MAY 1-31

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://rejoicecelticsaints.wordpress.com

REJOICE CELTIC SAINTS

SAINTS OF MY HEART

Young lady stroking her horse

ORTHODOX SAINTS OF WESTERN EUROPE

MAY

Sources:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/hp.php

ORTHODOX ENGLAND

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

May 1

Nina Koznitseva May 14 & May 1

+1938 New Martyr in the concentration camp in Arkhangelsk Russia, from Lalsk, Russia – Rejoicings to Saint Nina Koznitseva: Click HERE

Acius (Ache) and Aceolus (Acheul) May 1 

+ c 303. The former a deacon, the latter a subdeacon, they were martyred near Amiens in France under Diocletian.

Amator (Amatre, Amadour) May 1
+ 418. Bishop of Auxerre in France. He had been married to a holy woman, venerated locally as St Martha. St Amator ordained as priest his successor St Germanus who left us the Life of his predecessor.

Andeolus May 1
+ 208. A subdeacon from Smyrna sent to France by St Polycarp. He is said to have been martyred near Viviers on the Rhône.

Arigius May 1
535-604. Bishop of Gap in France for twenty years, he was a fine pastor.

Asaph May 1
+ c 600. One of St Kentigern’s monks in the north of Wales. He is believed to have succeeded St Kentigern as abbot and bishop, leaving his own name to the see now in Clwyd. Many of his relatives are also venerated as saints.

Benedict of Szkalka May 1
+ 1012. A hermit on Mount Zobor in Hungary. He was a disciple of St Andrew Zorard. Renowned for his asceticism, he was murdered by robbers in 1012.

Bertha May 1
+ c 680. Foundress of Avenay in France, she is honoured as a martyr.

Brieuc (Briocus, Brioc) May 1
c 420-510. Born in Dyfed in Wales, he went to Brittany where he founded two monasteries, one near Tréguier and the other in what is now St Brieuc. He is also venerated in Cornwall.

Ceallach (Kellach) May 1
6th cent. A disciple of St Kieran of Clonmacnoise, he became Bishop of Killala in Ireland. He ended his life as a hermit and may have been martyred.

Cominus May 1
? A martyr in Catania in Sicily.

Evermarus May 1
+ c 700. A pilgrim murdered by robbers in Rousson near Tongres in Belgium.

Grata May 1
4th (or 8th) cent. A holy woman from Bergamo in Italy, zealous in securing Christian burial for the bodies of the martyrs.

Marculf May 1
+ 558. The founder of a monastery of hermits on the Egyptian model in Nanteuil in France.

Orentius (or Orientius) of Auch May 1
+ c 439. A hermit in the Lavendan valley near Tarbes in France, whom the people of Auch insisted on having for bishop. He was their pastor for over forty years.

Orentius and Patientia May 1
+ c 240. A husband and wife who lived at Loret near Huesca in Spain. An ancient Spanish tradition makes them the parents of St Laurence the Martyr.

Sigismund May 1
+ 523. A Vandal by origin and by character, he was King of the Burgundians in what is now eastern France. He repented for his sins by giving generously to the Church and the poor. He was murdered near the monastery of Agaunum in Switzerland which he had built and was then honoured as a martyr.

Theodard May 1
+ 893. A monk at the monastery of St Martin in Montauriol in France, he became Archbishop of Narbonne. Later the monastery was named St Audard after him.

May 2

Bertin the Younger May 2
+ c 699. A monk at Sithin in France.

Felix of Seville May 2
? A deacon martyred in all probability in Seville in Spain.

Germanus May 2
+ c 460. Probably born in Ireland, he was converted by St Germanus of Auxerre whose name he took. He was martyred in France.

Neachtain May 2
5th cent. A relative of St Patrick of Ireland at whose repose he was present.

Ultan May 2
7th cent. Born in Ireland, he was the brother of Sts Fursey and Foillan and a monk with them at Burgh Castle near Yarmouth in England. From there he went to Belgium, where he was welcomed by St Gertrude of Nivelles. He served as a priest in the convent there until he succeeded St Foillan as Abbot of Fosses and Peronne.

Valentine May 2
+ c 307? Bishop of Genoa in Italy c 295-307.

Vindemialis, Eugene and Longinus May 2
+ c 485. Bishops in North Africa martyred by the Arian Vandal King Hunneric who inflicted horrible tortures on them.

Waldebert (Walbert, Gaubert) May 2
+ c 668. A monk and from about 628 Abbot of Luxeuil in France. The monastery was very influential and St Waldebert helped St Salaberga found a convent in Laon.

Wiborada (Guiborat, Weibrath) May 2
+ 925. A Swabian noble in Germany. When her brother became a monk at St Gall in Switzerland, she became an anchoress not far away, and here she lived the rest of her life. She was martyred by invading Hungarians.

May 3

Adalsindis May 3
c 680. Sister of St Waldalenus, founder of the monastery of Bèze in France. She became abbess of a convent near Bèze.

Aldwyn May 3
8th cent. Abbot of Partney in Lincolnshire in England.

Alexander I May 3 (In the East March 16)
c 115. The fifth Pope of Rome from c 107 to c 115.

Alexander, Eventius and Theodulus May 3
+ c 113. Three martyrs buried on the Via Nomentana in Rome.

Ansfridus May 3
+ 1010. Count of Brabant in Belgium, in 992 he built the convent of Thorn for his daughter and wife, himself wishing to become a monk. Instead he was made Archbishop of Utrecht in Holland. As such, he founded the monastery of Hohorst (Heiligenberg) and, when stricken with blindness, went there, fulfilling his ambition of living as a monk and reposing there.

Elwin (Ethelwin) May 3
8th cent. The second Bishop of Lindsey. He was a close friend of St Egbert whom he accompanied to Ireland and where he reposed.

Gluvias (Glywys) May 3
6th cent. Brother of St Cadoc of Llancarfan in Wales, he went to Cornwall, where he founded a monastery. A church in Cornwall is dedicated to him.

Juvenal of Narni May 3
+ 369. First Bishop of Narni in central Italy.

Philip of Zell May 3
+ c 770. A pilgrim from England, he settled as a hermit near Worms in Germany. With several disciples, he founded the monastery of Zell – so called from his own original cell – which later grew into the town of Zell.

Scannal May 3
+ c 563. Scannal of Cell-Coleraine in Ireland was a disciple of St Columba.

May 4

Antony May 4
6th cent. By tradition a disciple of St Benedict and companion of St Maurus in his mission to France. He was the founder of the monastery of Saint Julian in Tours. He is called ‘du Rocher’ because he ended his days as a hermit at a place called le Rocher.

Conleth May 4
+ c 519. A hermit in Old Connell on the River Liffey in Ireland. St Brigid came to know him and he became the spiritual father of her nuns at Kildare, of which he became the first bishop. He was a metalworker and very skilled as a copyist and illuminator.

Cunegund May 4
+ c 1052. A nun at the convent of Niedermunster in Ratisbon in Germany.

Curcodomus May 4
3rd cent. A deacon in Rome sent to help St Peregrinus, first Bishop of Auxerre in France.

Cyriacus (Quiriacus) May 4
? A Bishop of Ancona in Italy who was martyred under Julian the Apostate in the Holy Land.

Ethelred (Ailred) May 4
+ 716. King of Mercia in England, he abdicated in order to become a monk at Bardney where he later became abbot.

Florian May 4
+ 304. A senior Roman officer in Noricum, now Upper Austria, he was drowned in the River Enns near Lorsch under Diocletian. He is the patron-saint of Upper Austria and Poland.

Godehard (Godard, Gothard) May 4
+ Born in Bavaria, he became a monk at Niederaltaich in Germany. Later he restored monastic life elsewhere. The monasteries of Tegernsee, Hersfeld and Kremsmünster all received abbots from Niederaltaich. In 1022 he became Bishop of Hildesheim and did much to spread the Faith.

Hilsindis May 4
+ 1028. A widowed noblewoman who founded the convent of Thorn on the Marne in France.

Nepotian May 4
+ 395. Nephew of St Heliodorus, Bishop of Altino near Venice in Italy, by whom he was ordained after leaving his high position as an officer in the imperial bodyguard.

Paulinus of Sinigaglia May 4
+ 826. Bishop and now patron-saint of Sinigaglia in Italy.

Paulinus May 4
? A martyr whose relics are enshrined in Cologne in Germany.

Porphyrius May 4
+ 250. A priest who preached in Umbria in Italy and was beheaded under Decius.

Sacerdos (Sardot, Sadroc, Sardou, Serdon, Serdot) May 4
670-c 720. Born in the neighbourhood of Sarlat in Périgord in France, he became a monk and eventually founded Calabre. He became Bishop of Limoges.

Venerius May 4
+ 409. Ordained deacon by St Ambrose, he later became Bishop of Milan. He is remembered as a loyal supporter of St John Chrysostom.

May 5

Brito (Britonius) May 5
+ 386. Bishop of Trier in Germany. A firm opponent of the Priscillianists, he also refused to hand them over for punishment by the State.

Crescentiana May 5
5th cent. An early martyr in Rome.

Echa (Etha) May 5
+ 767. A priest and hermit in Crayke near York in England.

Geruntius of Milan May 5
+ c 470. Successor of St Eusebius as Bishop of Milan in Italy (c 465-470).

Hilary May 5
c 400-449. Born in Lorraine in France, he gained high office. His relative and friend, St Honoratus, invited him to the monastery founded in Lérins. Hilary received baptism and became a monk there. When St Honoratus became Bishop of Arles, he took Hilary as his secretary. St Hilary succeeded him and was famed for his zeal.

Hydroc May 5
5th cent. The patron saint of Lanhydroc in Cornwall.

Jovinian May 5
+ c 300. A companion of St Peregrinus of Auxerre in France, whom he served as a reader. By tradition he was martyred.

Maurontus (Mauront) May 5
+ 701. Eldest son of Sts Adalbald and Rictrudis, he became a monk at Marchiennes in France. Eventually he founded a monastery at Breuil-sur-lys near Douai, of which he is the patron-saint.

Nectarius May 5
+ c 445. Bishop of Vienne in France.

Nicetus May 5
+ c 449. The fifteenth bishop of Vienne in France.

Sacerdos May 5
+ c 560. A saint venerated in Murviedro in Spain and said to have been bishop there.

Silvanus May 5
? A martyr in Rome.

Theodore of Bologna May 5
+ c 550. Bishop of Bologna in Italy c 530-c 550.

Waldrada May 5
+ c 620. First Abbess of Saint-Pierre-aux-Nonnais in Metz in France.

May 6

Benedicta May 6
6th cent. A nun of the convent founded in Rome by St Galla, whose repose was foretold to her by the Apostle Peter in a vision.

Edbert (Eadbert) May 6
+ 698. A monk at Lindisfarne in England, who succeeded St Cuthbert as Bishop. He was remarkable for his knowledge of the Holy Scriptures.

Heliodorus, Venustus and Companions May 6
3rd cent. A group of seventy-seven martyrs who suffered under Diocletian. Heliodorus and seven others were martyred in North Africa, the others in Milan.

Petronax May 6
+ c 747. Born in Brescia in Italy, he restored monastic life at Montecassino with only a few hermits who chose him as abbot. He is called ‘the second founder of Montecassino’

May 7

Domitian May 7
+ c 560. Bishop of Maastricht in Holland and Apostle of the Meuse valley. His relics were venerated at Huy.

John of Beverley May 7
+ 721. Born in Harpham in Yorkshire in England, he became a monk at Whitby. He was consecrated Bishop of Hexham and later became Bishop of York. He ordained St Bede and founded a monastery at Beverley.

Juvenal of Benevento May 7
+ c 132. A saint of Narni in Italy. His shrine is in Benevento.

Peter of Pavia May 7
+ c 735. Bishop of Pavia in Italy during the reign of Luitprand, King of the Lombards.

Placid (Placidus, Plait) May 7
+ c 675. Abbot of St Symphorian in Autun in France.

Serenicus and Serenus May 7
+ c 669. Two brothers belonging to a noble family in Spoleto in Italy. They became monks and later settled as hermits near the River Sarthe in France. Serenus remained a hermit till the end of his life, but Serenicus became the abbot of a monastery with some one hundred and forty monks.

May 8

Benedict II May 8
+ 685. Born in Rome, he became Pope of Rome in 683.

Boniface IV May 8
+ 615. Born in Valeria in the Abruzzi in Italy, he became a monk at St Sebastian in Rome. He became Pope of Rome from 608 to 615.

Desideratus May 8
6th cent. Successor of St Arcadius as Bishop of Bourges in France.

Dionysius May 8
+ c 193. The successor of St Justus as Bishop of Vienne in the Dauphiné in France.

Gibrian May 8
+ c 515. A hermit in Ireland, the eldest of five brothers and three sisters. All of them went to Brittany and became saints there. Their names are given as Tressan, Helan, Germanus, Abran (or Gibrian), Petran, Franca, Promptia and Possenna.

Helladius of Auxerre May 8
+ 387. Bishop of Auxerre in France for thirty years. He converted his successor, St Amator.

Ida (Ita, Iduberga) of Nivelles May 8
+ 652. A widow, she became a nun at Nivelles in Belgium under her daughter, St Gertrude.

Odrian May 8
? An early Bishop of Waterford in Ireland.

Victor the Moor May 8
+ 303. A soldier from Mauritania in North Africa, martyred in Milan in Italy under Maximian.

Wiro, Plechelm and Otger May 8
Born in England, Wiro reposed in c 753. He became Bishop of Utrecht in Holland and is one of the Apostles of Frisia. He and his two companions founded a monastery at Odilienburg.

May 9

Beatus May 9
? An early hermit, venerated as the Apostle of Switzerland. His hermitage was at the place now called Beatenberg above the Lake of Thun.

Gerontius May 9
c 501. Bishop of Cervia near Ravenna in Italy, he was murdered in Cagli on the Flaminian Way, which led to him being honoured as a martyr.

Gorfor May 9
? Patron of Llanover in Gwent in Wales.

Gregory of Ostia May 9
+ c 1044. Bishop of Ostia in Italy, he spent much time in Navarre and Old Castile in Spain. He reposed at Logroño.

John of Châlon May 9
+ c 475. Third Bishop of Châlon-sur-Saône in France, consecrated by St Patiens of Lyons.

Sanctan May 9
6th cent. Bishop of Kill-da-Les and Kill-na-Sanctan near Dublin in Ireland.

Vincent May 9
+ c 950. Abbot of St Peter de Montes in Spain and a disciple and successor of St Gennadius.

May 10

Alphius, Philadelphus and Cyrinus May 10
+ 251. Brothers from Sicily martyred under Decius. They were held in great veneration in Sicily, mainly in Lentini, where they are patron-saints.

Aurelian May 10
3rd cent. Disciple of St Martial of Limoges in France and eventually bishop of that city.

Calepodius, Palmatius, Simplicius, Felix, Blanda and Companions May 10
+ 222-232. Martyrs in Rome under Alexander Severus. Calepodius, a priest, was the first to suffer; St Palmatius, of consular rank, died with his wife and children and forty-two members of his household. St Simplicius, a senator, was martyred with sixty-five members of his family and dependents. Sts Felix and Blanda were husband and wife.

Cataldus May 10
7th cent. Born in Munster in Ireland, he became a monk at Lismore. On his return from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, he was chosen as bishop by the people of Taranto in the south of Italy. The Cathedral of Taranto is dedicated to him.

Comgall May 10
c 516-601. Born in Ulster in Ireland, he became a monk with St Fintan and founded the monastery of Bangor (Ben-Chor), where he was the spiritual father of St Columbanus and many other monks who later enlightened Central Europe. It seems that he lived for some time in Wales, Cornwall and Scotland.

Quartus and Quintus May 10
? Two citizens of Capua in Italy who were condemned and executed in Rome. Their relics were returned to Capua and enshrined.

Solangia (Solange) May 10
+ c 880. A poor shepherdess near Bourges in France who defended her chastity and was brutally murdered.

May 11

Anastasius and Companions May 11
+ 251. A tribune in the army of the Emperor Decius, Anastasius was converted on witnessing the courage of the martyrs whom he was torturing to death. A few days after his conversion he too was arrested and beheaded with all his family and servants. Their relics are venerated in Camerino in central Italy.

Anastasius May 11
? The patron-saint of the town of Lérida in Catalonia in Spain. The people of Lérida assert that Anastasius was born there.

Anthimus May 11
+ 303. A priest in Rome, who converted the pagan husband, a prefect, of the Christian matron Lucina, famed for her charity to imprisoned fellow-Orthodox. The martyr, thrown into the Tiber and miraculously rescued by an angel, was afterwards recaptured and beheaded.

Evellius May 11
+ c 66. An advisor of Nero, converted to Christ on witnessing the patience of the martyrs and himself martyred in Pisa in Italy.

Fremund May 11
+ 866. A hermit who was martyred by the Danes. His relics were enshrined in Dunstable in England.

Gangulf May 11
+ 760. Born in Burgundy, he led the life of a hermit and was murdered.

Illuminatus May 11
+ c 1000. A monk at the Monastery of San Mariano in his native town of San Severino near Ancona in Italy.

Majolus (Maieul) May 11
c 906-994. Born in Avignon in France, became a priest and then a monk at Cluny in order to avoid becoming a bishop. Later he became Abbot of Cluny, advising Popes and Emperors.

Mamertus May 11
+ 475. Archbishop of Vienne in France and a man of great piety and faith.

Maximus, Bassus and Fabius May 11
+ 304. Martyrs in Rome under Diocletian.

Odilo May 11
c 962-1049. Of a noble family in Auvergne in France, he became a monk at the monastery of Cluny in about 990 and abbot in 994. Gentle and kind, he was known for his generosity to the poor.

Odo of Cluny May 11
c 879-942. Born in Maine in the west of France, he became a monk at Baume in 909 and Abbot of Cluny in 927. He freed Cluny from secular interference, paving the way for its rapid growth. He reposed in Tours at the tomb of St Martin.

Possessor May 11
+ c 485. A magistrate in Verdun in France who became bishop there in 470. He and his flock were greatly troubled by the barbarian Franks, Vandals and Goths.

Principia May 11
+ c 420. A holy virgin in Rome and disciple of St Marcella.

Sisinius, Diocletius and Florentius May 11
+ 303. Martyrs in Osimo near Ancona in Italy under Diocletian. They were stoned to death at the same time as the Roman priest, St Anthimus.

Tudy (Tudinus, Tegwin, Thetgo) May 11
5th cent. A disciple of St Brioc in Brittany. He was a hermit and then an abbot near Landevennec in Brittany. Like St Brioc he also spent some time in Cornwall, where a church and parish still bear his name.

Walbert (Vaubert) May 11
+ c 678. A noble of holy life born in Belgium, he was the husband of St Bertilia and father of Sts Waldetrudis and Aldegundis.

May 12

Diomma May 12
5th cent. The teacher of St Declan of Ardmore and other saints. He is venerated as the patron- saint of Kildimo in Co. Limerick in Ireland.

Dionysius May 12
+ 304. Born in Asia Minor, he was the uncle of St Pancras, to whom he acted as guardian. They came together to Rome, became Orthodox and were martyred under Diocletian,

Ethelhard May 12
+ 805. Born in Louth in Lincolnshire in England, he became the fifteenth Archbishop of Canterbury in 793. This was a time of political upheaval under Offa of Mercia who tried to abuse and dominate the Church like Charlemagne on the Continent. St Ethelhard resisted him.

Flavia Domitilla, Euphrosyna and Theodora May 12
2nd cent. Flavia Domitilla was a great-niece of the Emperors Domitian and Titus and St Flavius Clemens. She became Orthodox. On refusing to marry a pagan she was exiled from Rome and martyred with her foster sisters, Euphrosyna and Theodora, in Terracina in Italy.

Modoald May 12
+ 640. Born in Gascony in France, he was related by blood and united by friendship with most of the saints of the Merovingian period. In 662 he became Bishop of Trier in Germany.

Nereus and Achilleus May 12
+ c 100. Pretorian soldiers, baptised by tradition by the Apostle Peter, and exiled with Flavia Domitilla to Pontia and later to Terracina in Italy where they were beheaded.

Pancras May 12
+ c 304. (?) A martyr buried in the cemetery of Calepodius in Rome. In the seventh century relics of the saint were sent to England and St Pancras became popular there.

Philip of Agirone May 12
? A saint venerated in Agirone in Sicily as its first missionary.

Rictrudis May 12
+ 688. Born in Gascony in France, she married St Adalbald, by whom she had four children – all saints, Maurontius, Eusebia, Clotsindis and Adalsindis. After her husband’s repose she became a nun and founded the convent of Marchiennes in the north of France.

May 13

Agnes of Poitiers May 13
+ 588. Chosen by St Radegund to be Abbess of Holy Cross at Poitiers in France, Agnes adopted the rule of St Caesarius, handed to her by the bishop himself.

Anno (Hanno, Annon) May 13
+ 780. Born in Verona in Italy, he became bishop there and translated the relics of Sts Firmus and Rusticus.

Fortis Gabrielli May 13
+ 1040. Born in Gubbio in Umbria in Italy, he became a hermit in the mountains near Scheggia, but was later attached to the monastery of Fontavellana.

Mael (Mahel) May 13
6th cent. A disciple of St Cadfan with whom he crossed from Brittany to Wales. He lived as a hermit on the Isle of Bardsey.

Natalis May 13
+ 715. Bishop of Milan in Italy (740-751).

Onesimus May 13
+ c 361. Fifth Bishop of Soissons in France.

Servatus (Servais) May 13
+ 384. Bishop of Tongres in Belgium. He was the host of St Athanasius when the latter was exiled to the West.

Valerian May 13
+ c 350. Third Bishop of Auxerre in France and defender of Orthodoxy against Arianism.

May 14

Nina Koznitseva May 14 & May 1

+1938 New Martyr in the concentration camp in Arkhangelsk Russia, from Lalsk, Russia – Rejoicings to Saint Nina Koznitseva: Click HERE

Boniface of Tarsus May 14 

+ c 307. A martyr beheaded in Tarsus in Cilicia, where he had gone from Rome to recover the bodies of certain martyrs. His own relics are enshrined in the church of Sts Alexis and Boniface on the Aventine.

Boniface May 14
6th cent. Bishop of Ferentino in Tuscany at the time of the Emperor Justin. He is called on by those who are troubled by alcoholism.

Carthage (Carthach Mochuda) the Younger May 14
+ c 637. Born in Kerry in Ireland, he founded a monastery in Rathin in Westmeath, where he was abbot. Shortly before his repose, he and his monks were expelled. He led his monks to the banks of the Blackwater and founded the monastery of Lismore.

Erembert May 14
+ c 672. Born at Wocourt near Passy in France, he became a monk at Fontenelle (c 640) and Bishop of Toulouse (c 656.

Hallvard (Halward) May 14
+ c 1043. Of the royal family of Norway, he met his death while defending a woman who had appealed to him for help. He is the patron-saint of Oslo.

Justa, Justina and Henedina May 14
+ c 130. Saints venerated in Sardinia where they were martyred under Hadrian (117-138), either in Cagliari or else in Sassari.

Paschal I May 14
+ 824. Born in Rome, he was Abbot of St Stephen near the Vatican and became Bishop of Rome in 817. He defended the Orthodox in the East against the barbarous persecution of the iconoclasts. He is remembered for enshrining the relics of St Cecilia and other martyrs.

Pontius of Cimiez May 14
+ 258 (?) A martyr in Cimella (Cimiez) near Nice in the south of France. His relics gave his name to the town of Saint-Pons.

Tuto (Totto) May 14
+ 930. A monk and Abbot of St Emmeram in Regensburg in Germany, where he later became bishop.

May 15

Bercthun (Bertin) May 15
+ 733. A disciple of St John of Beverley and first Abbot of Beverley in England.

Caesarea May 15
? A holy virgin who took refuge in a cave near Otranto in the south of Italy to defend her virtue and lived there as an anchoress.

Cassius, Victorinus, Maximus and Companions May 15
+ c 264. A group of martyrs in Clermont in Auvergne in France, he suffered at the hands of Chrocas, the leader of invading Teutonic barbarians.

Colman Mc O’Laoighse May 15
6th cent. Also called Columbanus, he was a disciple of St Columba and St Fintan of Clonenagh. He founded and was abbot of a monastery in Oughaval in Ireland. He is still venerated at the nearby Orthodox church at Stradbally which is dedicated to him.

Dympna (Dymphna) May 15
? Born in Ireland, she was forced to flee to Belgium accompanied by a priest, St Gerebern. Their relics were discovered at Gheel near Antwerp in the thirteenth century. Since then numberless cases of mental illness have been healed at their shrine.

Hilary May 15
+ 558. A hermit near the River Ronco in Italy. Joined by others, he built the monastery called Galeata, later known as Sant’Ilaro.

Rupert and Bertha May 15
9th cent. A hermit who lived with his mother Bertha on a hill near Bingen in Germany. The hill has been since called after him, Rupertsberg.

Simplicius May 15
+ 304. A martyr in Sardinia buried alive at the time of Diocletian.

Torquatus, Ctesiphon, Secundus, Indaletius, Caecilius, Hesychius and Euphrasius May 15
1st cent. According to tradition, they were disciples of the Apostles sent to enlighten Spain. They worked chiefly in the South, as follows: Torquatus in Guadix near Granada; Ctesiphon in Verga; Secundus in Avila; Indaletius in Urci near Almeria; Caecilius in Granada; Hesychius in Gibraltar; Euphrasius in Andujar. Most of them suffered martyrdom. The Mozarabic liturgy had a common feast for all seven.

Waldalenus May 15
7th cent. Founder of the monastery of Bèze in France and brother of St Adalsindis.

May 16

Annobert (Alnobert) May 16
+ c 689. A monk at Almenèches, he was consecrated Bishop of Séez in France in about 685.

Brendan the Voyager May 16
c 486-c 575 or c 583. One of the three most famous ascetics of Ireland. He was born in Kerry, becoming a disciple of St Finian at Clonard and of St Gildas at Llancarfan in Wales. He was a great founder of monasteries, especially of Clonfert. He is best known in history for his voyages and may have reached North America. St Brendan is venerated as the patron- saint of sailors.

Carantac (Carantog, Caimach, Carnath) May 16
5th cent. Born in Wales, he worked with St Patrick in the enlightenment of Ireland.

Carantoc May 16
6th cent. An abbot who founded the church of Llangranog in Wales. He is linked with Crantock in Cornwall and Carhampton in Somerset in England and was also venerated in Brittany.

Domnolus May 16
+ 581. Abbot of the monastery of St Laurence near Paris. In 543 he became Bishop of Le Mans, where he founded many monasteries, churches and hospitals.

Felix and Gennadius May 16
? Two martyrs venerated from ancient times in Uzalis in North Africa.

Fidolus (Phal) May 16
+ c 540. The son of an official in Auvergne in France. Taken prisoner and sold into slavery, he was ransomed by Aventinus, Abbot of Aumont near Troyes. Later Fidolus himself became abbot there, which was called Saint-Phal after him.

Fort May 16
? 1st cent. The first Bishop of Bordeaux in France, venerated as a martyr.

Francoveus (Franchy) May 16
7th cent. A monk at St Martin de la Bretonnière in France, he suffered from the jealousy of others. When the monastery was destroyed, he lived as a hermit in the Nivernais.

Germerius May 16
+ ? 560. Bishop of Toulouse in France for fifty years.

Hilary May 16
+ 376. Bishop of Pavia. One of the bishops in the north of Italy who fought against Arianism.

Honoratus of Amiens May 16
+ c 600. Born in Ponthieu in France, he became Bishop of Amiens. The church and Boulevard Saint-Honoré in Paris are called after him.

Maxima May 16
? A holy virgin revered around Fréjus in France, where several villages are named after her.

Peregrinus May 16
+ c 138 (?) Bishop of Terni in Umbria in Italy and founder of its Cathedral.

Peregrinus May 16
+ c 304. By tradition he came from Rome to become first Bishop of Auxerre in France and was martyred under Diocletian in a village called Bouhy.

Possidius May 16
c 370-c 440. Bishop of Calama in Numidia in North Africa, when he was driven out by Arian Vandals, reposing in Apulia in Italy. He opposed both Donatism and Pelagianism.

Primael May 16
+ c 450. From Britain, he went to Brittany and became a hermit near Quimper.

May 17

Cathan (Catan, Chattan, Cadan) May 17
6th or 7th cent. A bishop in the Isle of Bute in Scotland, often called Kil-Cathan after him. His tomb is at Tamlacht in Ireland but others maintain that his relics are on Bute

Gerebern (Gerebrand) May 17
7th cent. A priest from Ireland, he accompanied St Dympna to Belgium and shared in her martyrdom. He is patron-saint of a village in the Rhineland in Germany, where his relics are enshrined.

Heradius, Paul, Aquilinus and Companions May 17
+ 303 Five martyrs at Nyon in Switzerland under Diocletian.

Maden (Madern, Madron) May 17
+ c 545. A hermit born in Cornwall, he later lived in Brittany. Many churches are dedicated to him, the most noted being at St Madern’s Well in Cornwall, the reputed site of his hermitage and still a place of pilgrimage.

Mailduf May 17
+ 673. Born in Ireland, he went to England and founded the monastery of Malmesbury, where St Aldhelm was among his disciples.

Rasso (Ratho) May 17
+ 953. A noble from Bavaria in Germany, he fought bravely against the invading Hungarians. Later he went on pilgrimage to Palestine and Rome and on his return founded the monastery of Worth in Bavaria (now called Grafrath after him) and became a monk there.

Restituta May 17
+ 255 (or 304). A virgin-martyr in Carthage in North Africa under Valerian or Diocletian. Her relics are enshrined in Naples in Italy.

May 18

Elgiva May 18
+ 944. Widow of King Edmund and mother of St Edgar, she became Abbess of Shaftesbury in England.

Felix of Spoleto May 18
+ c 304. A bishop, either of Spoleto or of Spello in Italy. He was martyred under Diocletian.

Feredarius May 18
+ c 863. Born in Ireland, he became Abbot of Iona in Scotland in 863.

John I May 18
+ 526. Born in Tuscany, he became Pope of Rome in 523. In 526 he went to Constantinople as an envoy of Theodoric, the Arian King of the Ostrogoths. On his return Theodoric imprisoned the Pope and he died.

Merililaun (Merolilaun) May 18
8th cent. A pilgrim who was murdered near Rheims and venerated as a martyr.

Venantius May 18
+ c 250. By tradition a boy of fifteen who was martyred in Camerino near Ancona in Italy under Decius.

May 19

Calocerus and Parthenius May 19
+ 250. Two brothers, eunuchs in the palace of Tryphonia, wife of the Emperor Decius. They were martyred in Rome in the Decian persecution.

Cyril May 19
5th cent. Bishop of Trier in Germany, his relics were enshrined in the church of St Matthias in Trier.

Dunstan May 19
909-988. Born near Glastonbury, he became a monk and abbot there. He was called to court as a counsellor but was forced into exile. He then spent a year in Ghent, a centre of monastic revival, but then he was recalled to England by King Edgar and became his main advisor. He was consecrated Bishop of Worcester in 957 and Archbishop of Canterbury in 961. Together with Sts Ethelwold of Winchester and Oswald of York, he restored monastic life in England. He reposed peacefully at Canterbury.

Hadulf May 19
+ c 728. Bishop of Arras-Cambrai in the north of France.

Pudens May 19
1st cent ? A Roman senator baptised by the Apostles. He is identified by many with the Pudens mentioned by the Apostle Paul (2 Tim 4,21).

Pudentiana (or Potentiana) May 19
2nd cent. A holy virgin in Rome, daughter of the senator St Pudens. By tradition she died at the age of sixteen.

May 20

Anastasius May 20
+ 610. Bishop of Brescia in Lombardy in Italy. He greatly contributed to the conversion of the Lombards from Arianism..

Austregisilus (Aoustrille, Outrille) May 20
551-624. Born in Bourges in France, he preferred the life of a monk at Saint-Nizier in Lyons, where he became abbot. In 612 he was elected Bishop of Bourges.

Basilla May 20
+ 304. Having been baptised, she refused to marry a pagan patrician and so was martyred for Christ in Rome.

Baudelius May 20
2nd (or 3rd) cent. Born in Orleans in France, he was married and worked zealously for Orthodoxy. He was martyred in Nîmes. Veneration for him spread throughout France and the north of Spain and some four hundred churches were dedicated to him.

Ethelbert (Albert, Albright) May 20
+ 794. King of East Anglia in England, he was treacherously murdered by Offa of Mercia. He has always been venerated as a martyr, especially in Hereford and in East Anglia.

Hilary May 20
4th cent. Bishop of Toulouse in France

Plautilla May 20
+ c 67. The mother of Flavia Domitilla. By tradition she was baptised by the Apostle Peter and was present at the martyrdom of the Apostle Paul.

Theodore of Pavia May 20
+ 778. Bishop of Pavia in Italy 743-778. He had much to endure, including repeated exiles under the Lombard Kings.

May 21

Ageranus (Ayran, Ayrman) May 21
+ 888. Ageranus was a monk at Bèze in in France. When the Vikings invaded Burgundy most of the monks escaped, but Ageranus remained with four other monks, Genesius, Bernard, Sifiard and Rodron, the boy Adalaric and the priest Ansuinus. All were martyred by the invaders.

Barrfoin (Bairrfhionn, Barrindus) May 21
6th cent. By tradition he was in charge of the church founded by St Columba in Drum Cullen in Offaly in Ireland and later he lived in Killbarron near Ballyshannon in Donegal. It is said that he reached America on one of his missions by sea and informed St Brendan the Navigator of his discovery. He is also said to have been a bishop.

Gollen (Collen, Colan) May 21
? 7th cent. A saint who has given his name to Llangollen in Wales.

Hospitius May 21
+ c 580. A hermit at the place now called after him, Cap-Saint-Hospice, between Villefrance and Banlieu in France. His relics were translated to Lérins.

Isberga (Itisberga) May 21
+ c 800. A nun at Aire in France where she is venerated as the patroness of Artois.

Secundinus May 21
+ c 306. A martyr in Cordoba in Spain under Diocletian.

Theobald (Thibaud) of Vienne May 21
+ 1001. Archbishop of Vienne in France 970-1001.

Timothy, Polius and Eutychius May 21
? Three deacons in Mauretania Caesariensis in North Africa martyred under Diocletian.

Valens and Companions May 21
? By tradition a bishop martyred in Auxerre in France with three boys.

May 22

Aigulphus (Ayoul, Aieul, Aout, Hou) May 22
+ c 835. After an excellent education he chose to live as a hermit. However, about the year 812 he was made Bishop of Bourges in France against his will.

Ausonius May 22
3rd cent. By tradition a disciple of St Martial of Limoges and first Bishop of Angoulême in France.

Bobo (Beuvon) May 22
+ c 985. A warrior who fought bravely against invading Saracens and then lived as a hermit in repentance. He reposed at Pavia in Italy while on pilgrimage to Rome.

Boethian May 22
7th cent. Born in Ireland and a disciple of St Fursey, he built the monastery of Pierrepont near Laon in France and was eventually murdered by evildoers.

Castus and Emilius May 22
+ c 250. Two martyrs who suffered in North Africa under Decius. At first they gave way under torture, but then repented. On being arrested a second time they were burnt to death.

Conall (Coel, Conald) May 22
7th cent. Abbot of Inniscoel in Donegal in Ireland, where there is a holy well dedicated to him.

Faustinus, Timothy and Venustus May 22
+ c 362. Martyrs in Rome under Julian the Apostate.

Fulk May 22
+ c 600. A pilgrim to Rome who gave his life for the plague-stricken at Santo-Padre or Castrofuli near Arpino in the south of Italy. He is venerated as the patron saint of the area.

Helen May 22
+ c 418. A holy woman in Auxerre in France.

John of Parma May 22
+ c 982. Born in Parma in Italy, he was ordained priest. He is said to have made six pilgrimages to Jerusalem. He became Abbot of St John’s in Parma (973-c 982).

Julia May 22 (In the East July 16)
+ 440. Born in Carthage in North Africa, she was sold into slavery by the Vandal conquerors. The ship on which she was being taken to Gaul stopped in Corsica. At that time heathen festival was being celebrated and when Julia refused to join in, she was immediately martyred by being nailed to a cross. She is the patron-saint of Corsica.

Marcian of Ravenna May 22
+ c 127. Fourth Bishop of Ravenna in Italy, where he is known as San Mariano.

Quiteria May 22
? A saint greatly venerated on the border of France and Spain, especially in Navarre.

Romanus of Subiaco May 22
+ c 560. A monk who lived near Subiaco in Italy, discovered the hermitage of St Benedict, made him a monk and gave him his daily food.

May 23

Desiderius May 23
407 ? Born in Genoa, he became Bishop of Langres in France. He was killed at the time of a Vandal invasion while interceding for his people.

Epitacius and Basileus May 23
1st cent. By tradition the former was the first Bishop of Tuy in Galicia in Spain and the latter the first Bishop of Braga in Portugal .

Euphebius May 23
? Bishop of Naples in Italy.

Eutychius and Florentius May 23
6th cent. Two monks and wonderworkers who became abbots of a monastery in Valcastoria in Italy.

Goban Gobhnena May 23
6th or 7th cent. Abbot of the monastery of Old Leighlin, from where he went to Tascaffin in Co. Limerick in Ireland.

Guibertus May 23
+ 962. A noble from Lorraine in France, who after a military career lived the life of a hermit on his own estate of Gembloux in Brabant in Belgium. Eventually he turned it into a monastery before retiring to the monastery of Gorze in the east of France.

Mercurialis May 23
+ c 406. First Bishop of Forli in central Italy. He opposed paganism and Arianism.

Quintian, Lucius, Julian and Companions May 23
+ c 430. Three of a group of nineteen martyred in North Africa under the Arian Vandal King Hunneric.

Syagrius (Siacre) May 23
+ c 787. A monk at Lérins in the south of France who later founded the monastery of St Pons at Cimiez, after which he became Bishop of Nice (777).

May 24

Afra May 24
? A martyr in Brescia in Italy.

Donatian and Rogatian May 24
+ 299. Two brothers of Nantes in Brittany martyred under Diocletian.

Patrick May 24
+ c 469. The fourth Bishop of Bayeux in France.

Robustian May 24
? An early martyr in Milan in Italy.

Vincent of Lérins May 24
+ c 445. Perhaps of a noble family in Gaul, in early life he followed a military career but abandoned it to become a monk at Lérins in southern France. He is best known as the writer of the Commonitorium, where he formulates the Orthodox principle that the only true teachings are those which have been held ‘everywhere, always and by all the faithful’ (Quod ubique, quod semper, quod ab omnibus). It is the Church which interprets the Scriptures and is the source of the Faith.

Vincent of Porto May 24
? A martyr in Porto Romano, the former port of Rome.

Zöellus, Servilius, Felix, Silvanus and Diocles May 24
? Early martyrs in Istria.

May 25

Aldhelm May 25
639-709. Born in Wessex in England, he became a monk at Malmesbury and taught there. In 675 he became abbot and in 705 first Bishop of Sherborne. Aldhelm was the first Englishman to attain distinction as a scholar.

Bede the Venerable May 25
673-735. Born in Wearmouth in the north of England, as a child he entered the monastery of Sts Peter and Paul at Wearmouth-Jarrow, and spent his whole life there, ‘always praying, always writing, always reading, always teaching’. He wrote many commentaries on the Scriptures. His work The History of the English Church and People earned him the title of the Father of English History. He reposed on Ascension Eve and his dying words were Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.

Dionysius of Milan May 25
+ 359. The successor of St Protasius as Bishop of Milan in Italy in 351. In 355 he was exiled to Cappadocia by the Arian Emperor Constantius for defending St Athanasius. He died in exile but St Ambrose had his relics translated to Milan.

Dunchadh May 25
+ 717. Abbot of Iona in Scotland.

Egilhard May 25
+ 881. The eighth abbot of Cornelimünster near Aachen in Germany. He was killed by Vikings at Bercheim.

Gennadius May 25
+ c 936. A monk at Argeo near Astorga in Spain, he restored the monastery of San Pedro de Montes. About the year 895 he became Bishop of Astorga, but five years before his repose he returned to his beloved San Pedro to live as a hermit.

Gerbald, Reginhard, Winebald and Worad May 25
+ 862. The first two were monks, the latter two deacons, of the monastery of St Bertin in France. They were all martyred by the Danes.

Injuriosus and Scholastica May 25
+ c 550. A married couple in the Auvergne in France who lived in virginity and holiness.

Leo of Troyes May 25
+ c 550. A monk who succeeded St Romanus as Abbot of Mantenay near Troyes in France.

Maximus and Victorinus May 25
+ c 384. Two brothers martyred by barbarians near Evreux in France.

Urban I May 25
+ 230. Born in Rome, he succeeded St Callistus as Pope of Rome (222-230). At that time the Church enjoyed relative peace.

Zenobius May 25
+ c 390. Bishop of Florence in Italy. A friend of St Ambrose and St Damasus, he raised a dead child to life and cast out demons.

May 26

Eithne (Ethenia) May 26 & Feb 26

6th cent. Founder and abbess of the Monastery in Isle of Jura in Hebrides Islands, Scotland. She is mother of St. Columbia of Iona, from Ireland – Rejoicings to Saint Eithne (Ethenia): Click HERE

Becan May 26
6th cent. A hermit near Cork in Ireland in the time of St Columba.

Dyfan (Deruvianus, Damian) May 26
2nd cent. By tradition an early missionary in Britain. His church in Merthyr Dyfan shows the popular tradition that he ended his days as a martyr.

Eleutherius May 26
+ 189. A Greek who became a deacon in Rome and succeeded St Soterius as Pope in 175.

Felicissimus, Heraclius and Paulinus May 26
+ 303. Martyrs under Diocletian, in all probability in Todi in Umbria in Italy, where their relics are still venerated.

Fugatius and Damian May 26
? 2nd cent. By tradition they were missionaries sent to Britain from Rome.

Guinizo May 26
+ c 1050. Born in Spain, he became a monk at Montecassino in Italy and remained as a hermit on the holy mountain after one of the destructions of the monastery.

Oduvald May 26
+ 698. A noble who became a monk and later Abbot of Melrose in Scotland.

Priscus and Companions May 26
+ c 272. Priscus, a Roman officer, several soldiers under his command and a number of citizens of Besançon in France were martyred near Auxerre.

Quadratus May 26
? A martyr in North Africa.

Regintrudis May 26
+ c 750 Fourth Abbess of Nonnberg near Salzburg in Austria.

Simitrius and Companions May 26
+ c 159. A group of twenty-three martyrs in Rome, arrested while praying in the church of St Praxedes and beheaded without trial.

Zachary May 26
+ c 106. By tradition the second Bishop of Vienne in France, martyred under Trajan.

May 27

Augustine of Canterbury May 27
+ c 604. He shares the title of Apostle of the English with St Gregory the Great. A monk at St Andrew’s on the Coelian Hill, he was sent by St Gregory the Great with a group of forty monks to enlighten England. The missionaries landed at Ebbsfleet near Kent in 597. Soon Augustine had converted the King of Kent with thousands of his subjects. Consecrated bishop in ArIes, he set up his see in Canterbury. Trained in the Roman way, he was not successful in his relations with the Celts. He reposed shortly after St Gregory the Great.

Bruno May 27
+ 1045. Bishop of Würzburg in Germany, he encouraged church-building and spent his private fortune on this.

Eutropius May 27
+ c 475. Born in Marseilles, he succeeded St Justin as Bishop of Orange in France, when the diocese had been laid waste by the Visigoths.

Melangell (Monacella) May 27
+ c 590. A holy virgin who lived as an anchoress in Powys in Wales. Her shrine is in Pennant Melangell.

Ranulf (Ragnulf) May 27
+ 700. A martyr in Thélus near Arras in France. He was the father of St Hadulph, Bishop of Arras-Cambrai.

Restituta and Companions May 27
+ 272. Born in Rome of a noble family, she fled to Sora in Campania in Italy to escape persecution under Aurelian but was martyred there with several companions.

May 28

Caraunus (Ceraunus, Cheron) May 28
5th cent. Of Roman descent, he preached the Gospel in France and was killed by robbers near Chartres. A church and monastery were built over his tomb.

Crescens, Dioscorides, Paul and Helladius May 28
+ c 244. Orthodox Christians burnt to death in Rome.

Emilius, Felix, Priam and Lucian May 28
? Churches are dedicated to these saints in Sardinia.

Germanus of Paris May 28
c 496-576. Born near Autun in France, he became an abbot and later Bishop of Paris. He healed King Childebert I and converted him from an evil life. The King built the monastery of St Vincent for him, which is now known as Saint-Germain-des-Prés. St Germanus was given the title of ‘father of the poor’.

Justus of Urgell May 28
+ c 527. The first recorded Bishop of Urgell in Catalonia in Spain. He wrote a commentary on the Song of Songs.

Podius May 28
+ 1002. From Tuscany, he became a priest and then Bishop of Florence in Italy from 990.

Senator May 28
+ 480. A priest from Milan in Italy who attended the Council of Chalcedon as a young man and later became Archbishop of Milan.

William of Gellone May 28
755-812. After a military career, he built a monastery at Gellone in France not far from Aniane which he filled with monks. Later the monastery was named after him Saint-Guilhem-du-Desert.

May 29

Eleutherius May 29
? A pilgrim, said to have been from England and the brother of Sts Grimwald and Fulk, he died in Rocca d’Arce in the south of Italy. He is venerated as the main patron-saint there.

Gerald May 29
+ 927. A monk at Brou in France, he became Bishop of Mâcon but after some forty years as bishop he returned to his monastery and reposed there.

John de Atares May 29
+ c 750. A hermit in the Pyrenees in Spain. He lived beneath a huge rock, where the monastery of St John de Ia Peña (of the Rock) was later built. This is famous in Spanish history, since the monastery became the cradle of the Kingdoms of Navarre and Aragon.

Maximinus of Trier May 29
+ c 349. Born in Silly near Poitiers in France, he was a brother of St Maxentius of Poitiers. In 333 he became Bishop of Trier in Germany and was the valiant defender and host of St Athanasius of Alexandria and St Paul of Constantinople, exiled by the Arian Emperor. He was a prominent opponent of Arianism at the Councils of Milan, Sardica and Cologne and one of the most courageous bishops of his time.

Maximus May 29
? 6th cent. Bishop of Verona in Italy.

Restitutus May 29
+ c 299. A martyr in Rome under Diocletian.

Sisinius, Martyrius and Alexander May 29
+ 397. By tradition from Cappadocia, they were received by St Vigilius of Trent in Italy on the recommendation of St Ambrose. They were sent to enlighten the Tyrol in Austria and martyred by pagans.

Ulric of Einsiedeln May 29
+ c 978. Son of St Gerold, he became a monk at the monastery of Einsiedeln in Switzerland. After his father’s death he retired to live as a hermit in the latter’s cell.

Votus, Felix and John May 29
+ c 750. Votus and Felix were brothers from Saragossa in Spain who found a hermitage in the Pyrenees which was already inhabited by John. The three lived together and reposed at about the same time. The hermitage was situated beneath a huge rock (Peña) where the monastery of St John de la Peña later grew up.

May 30

Anastasius May 30
+ 680. A convert from Arianism, he became Bishop of Pavia in the north of Italy in 668. He is often called Anastasius II to distinguish him from one of his predecessors.

Exuperantius May 30
+ 418. Bishop of Ravenna in Italy from 398 to 418.

Felix I May 30
+ 274. Born in Rome, he was Pope from 269 to 274. He was the first to condemn the heresy of Paul of Samosata. He may have been martyred.

Gabinus and Crispulus May 30
+ c 130. The Protomartyrs of Sardinia. They suffered in Torres where they had preached the Gospel under Hadrian.

Gamo May 30
8th cent. Monk and then Abbot of Brétigny near Noyon in France.

Hubert (Hugbert) of Bretigny May 30
+ c 714. Aged twelve he became a monk at Brétigny near Noyon in France.

Madelgisilus (Mauguille) May 30
+ c 655. Born in Ireland, he was disciple of St Fursey. After some years of monastic life at St Riquier in France, he went to live as a hermit with St Pulgan near Monstrelet.

Venantius May 30
+ c 400. Elder brother of St Honoratus, founder of Lérins in France. After living as hermit on an island near Cannes, both travelled to the East to learn the monastic life.

Walstan May 30
965-1016. Born at Bawburgh in Norfolk in England, he spent his life as a farm labourer in Taverham and Costessey, being remarkable for his charity to all in need.

May 31

Cantius, Cantian, Cantianilla and Protus May 31.
+ c 304 Two brothers and their sister, martyred in Aquileia in Italy where they had gone with their tutor, Protus.

Crescentian May 31
+ c 130. A martyr in Sassari in Sardinia, at the same time as Sts Gabinus and Crispulus under the Emperor Hadrian.

Lupicinus May 31
5th cent. Bishop of Verona in Italy, described as ‘the most holy, the best of bishops’.

Paschasius May 31
+ c 512. A deacon in Rome who wrote theological works.

Petronilla May 31
1st cent. (?). A virgin in Rome venerated from the earliest times.

Winnow, Mancus and Myrbad May 31
Probably 6th cent. Three saints from Ireland who lived in Cornwall where churches are dedicated to them.

JUNE 1-30

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://rejoicecelticsaints.wordpress.com

REJOICE CELTIC SAINTS

SAINTS OF MY HEART

25-wildlife-photography-how-to-capture-animals-in-love

ORTHODOX SAINTS OF WESTERN EUROPE

JUNE

Sources:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/hp.php

ORTHODOX ENGLAND

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

Atto (St) June 1
c 1044. A monk at Oña in Spain with St Enneco. Later he became Bishop of Oca-Valpuesta.

Caprasius June 1
+ c 430. Born in France, he went to live as a hermit to the island of Lérins. He was followed by Sts Honoratus and Venantius. Together they went to the East to learn from the monasteries there. Venantius reposed in Greece; the other two returned to Lérins, where St Honoratus founded the monastery of Lérins. Later he became Bishop of Arles and was succeeded by Caprasius as abbot.

Clarus June 1
? A bishop who preached the Gospel in Aquitaine in France, where he was martyred.

Crescentian June 1
+ c 287. A soldier beheaded in Saldo near Città di Castello in Italy.

Felinus and Gratian June 1
+ 250. Soldiers in the imperial army martyred in Perugia in Italy under Decius. Their relics were translated to Arona near Milan in 979.

Fortunatus June 1
+ c 400. A parish priest at a place near Spoleto in Umbria in Italy. He was famed for his love for the poor.

Gaudentius of Ossero June 1
+ 1044. Bishop of Ossero in Istria from 1030 to 1032. In 1042 he left to live as a simple monk in Italy.

Justin the Philosopher or Justin Martyr June 1
c 100-165. Born in Nablus in Palestine of pagan parents, when he was about thirty he was converted by reading the Scriptures and witnessing the heroism of the martyrs. His Apologies for the Christian Religion and Dialogue with the Jew Trypho are among the most edifying of second-century writings. He was beheaded in Rome with other Christians.

Juventius June 1
? A martyr in Rome.

Proculus June 1
+ c 304 (?) By tradition a Roman officer martyred in Bologna in Italy under Diocletian.

Reverianus, Paul and Companions June 1
+ 272. Born in Italy, Reverianus, a bishop, and Paul, a priest, went to France. They enlightened Autun and the surrounding area and were martyred with several companions under Aurelian.

Ronan June 1
? An early bishop of Cornish origin who preached in Cornwall and in Brittany.

Secundus June 1
+ 304. An martyr in Amelia in Italy who was drowned in the Tiber under Diocletian.

Simeon of Trier June 1
+ 1035. Born in Syracuse in Sicily and educated in Constantinople, Simeon lived as a hermit by the Jordan. He became a monk in Bethlehem and later lived near Mt Sinai as a hermit, first in a small cave near the Red Sea and then on the summit of Mt Sinai. From there he was sent by the Abbot of Mt Sinai to seek alms in Normandy. Eventually he settled in Trier in Germany, one of the last great figures linking the Orthodox West with the Orthodox East

Wistan (Winston) June 1
+ 850. Of the royal house of Mercia in England, he was murdered at Wistanstow in Shropshire and was buried at Repton. His relics were later enshrined in Evesham.

Wite June 1
? Martyred by the Danes in Dorset in England. Her relics still exist in their shrine at Whitchurch Canonicorum: the only ones to have survive in a parish church in England. Pilgrims still honour her at the shrine and there is a holy well at Morcombe Lake nearby.

June 2

Adalgis (Adelgis, Algis) June 2
+ c 686. Born in Ireland, he was a disciple of St Fursey and preached around Arras and Laon in the north of France. He founded a small monastery in the forest of Thiquerarche in Picardy, around which grew up the village of Saint Algis.

Bodfan (Bobouan) June 2
7th cent. The patron saint of Abern in Gwynedd in Wales. He became a monk together with his father and other relations.

Cyriacus and Apollinaris June 2I
? Martyrs in North Africa.

Erasmus (Elmo, Erarmo, Ermo) June 2
+ c 303. Bishop of Formiae in Campania in Italy, martyred by disembowelment under Diocletian. His relics were transferred to Gaeta in 842 and he became the protector of sailors, hence ‘St Elmo’s fire’.

Eugene June 2
+ 657. A priest in Rome who acted for St Martin during the latter’s exile in the Chersonese. After St Martin’s martyrdom in 655, Eugene was chosen to succeed him. Gentle and kind to the poor, he opposed Monothelitism with courage.

Marcellinus and Peter June 2
+ 304. Martyred in Rome, Marcellinus was a priest and Peter probably an exorcist.

Nicholas the Pilgrim June 2
1075-1094. A Greek Fool-for-Christ who went to the south of Italy and wandered through Apulia carrying a cross, crying ‘Kyrie eleison’, calling for repentance. Crowds of people, especially children, followed him repeating the same cry. He was taken for a simpleton but after his repose in Trani, aged nineteen, so many miracles took place at his tomb that he was recognised as a saint.

Photinus (or Pothinus), Sanctius (Sanctus), Vetius, Epagathus, Maturus, Ponticus, Biblis (Biblides), Attalus, Alexander, Blandina and Companions June 2
+ 177. Martyrs in Lyons in France under Marcus Aurelius. The details of their martyrdom are given in a letter written by the Churches of Vienne and Lyons to those in Asia. The writer may have been St Irenaeus. The martyrs were attacked by a pagan mob and later tried and condemned for their faith. Photinus, their leader, bishop of the city, an old man aged ninety, reposed in his dungeon. The others were thrown to the wild beasts in the amphitheatre at the public games.

June 3

Caecilius (Caecilian) June 3
3rd cent. A priest in Carthage in North Africa who converted St Cyprian to Christ. St Cyprian never ceased to revere his name, adding it to his own, and on Caecilius’s repose, he looked after his wife and children.

Clotilde June 3
c 474-545. Born in Lyons in France and daughter of the King of Burgundy, she married Clovis, King of the Franks, and led her husband to Orthodox Christianity. She suffered much because of the quarrels of her three sons.

Cominus June 3
2nd century. A companion of St Photinus (Pothinus) and martyr in Lyons in France.

Cronan June 3
+ 617. A disciple of St Kevin in Ireland.

Davinus June 3
+ 1051. Born in Annenia, he went on a pilgrimage to Rome and Compostella. On his way he stopped in Lucca, where he reposed and was venerated as a saint.

Gausmarus June 3
+ 984 Abbot of St Martin of Savigny in France (954-984).

Genesius June 3
+ 662. Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne in France. He is described as learned, benevolent, surpassingly good, loved by old and young, rich and poor.

Glunshallaich June 3
7th cent. A repentant man in Ireland, converted by St Kevin and buried with him at Glendalough.

Hilary June 3
? 4th cent. Bishop of Carcassonne in France.

Isaac June 3
+ 852. Born in Cordoba in Spain, he became proficient in Arabic and a notary under the Moorish government. He resigned in order to become a monk at Tabanos, a few miles from Cordoba. During a public debate in Cordoba he denounced Mohammed and was martyred.

Kevin (Coemgen, Caoimhghin) June 3
+ c 618. Born in Leinster, he was a disciple of St Petroc who then lived in Ireland. He is remembered as the founder of Glendalough, one of the most famous names in Irish history. St Kevin is one of the patron saints of Dublin.

Liphardus (Lifard) June 3
+ c 550. A prominent lawyer in Orleans in France, at the age of fifty he founded the monastery of Meung-sur-Loire.

Oliva June 3
? A nun at Anagni near Rome.

Pergentinus and Laurentinus June 3
+ 251. Two brothers martyred in Arezzo in Italy under Decius.

June 4

Aldegrin (Adalgrin, Aldegrin) June 4
+ 939. A noble who became a monk near Cluny in France.

Alexander June 4
8th cent. Bishop of Verona in Italy.

Aretius (Arecius, Aregius) and Dacian June 4
? Roman martyrs who were buried in the catacombs on the Appian Way.

Breaca June 4
5th-6th cent. A disciple of St Brigid who crossed from Ireland to Cornwall (c 460) with several companions.

Buriana June 4
6th cent. Born in Ireland, she lived as an anchoress in Cornwall. St Buryan is named after her.

Clateus June 4
+ c 64. One of the earliest bishops of Brescia in Italy, martyred under Nero.

Croidan, Medan and Degan June 4
6th cent. Three disciples of St Petroc in Cornwall.

Edfrith June 4
+ 721. Bishop of Lindisfarne in England after St Edbert, he illuminated the Lindisfarne Gospels in honour of St Cuthbert.

Elsiar June 4
+ c 1050. A monk at Saint-Savin in Lavedan in France.

Nennoc (Nennocha, Ninnoc) June 4
+ c 467. A holy virgin from Britain who followed St Germanus of Auxerre to France and who became abbess of one or more convents in Brittany.

Optatus of Milevis June 4
+ c 387. Bishop of Milevis in Numidia in North Africa. He opposed Donatism, writing six treatises against them which were praised by his contemporaries.

Petroc (Petrock, Pedrog, Perreux) June 4
+ c 594. Born in Wales, he studied in Ireland and settled in Cornwall, where he was very active. He founded a monastery at a place called after him, Petrocstow (Padstow), and another at Bodmin where he reposed.

Quirinus June 4
+ 308. Bishop of Siscia (Sisak or Seseg), now in Croatia. Having fled to escape the persecution of Galerius, he was captured and ordered to sacrifice to the gods. He refused, was barbarously beaten and handed over to the governor of Pannonia Prima at Sabaria, now Szombathely, in Hungary. There, on his continued refusal to apostatise, he was drowned in the River Raab.

Quirinus June 4
? A martyr in Tivoli near Rome.

Rutilus and Companions June 4
? Martyrs at Sabaria (Sabar) in Pannonia, now Hungary.

Saturnina June 4
? A virgin-martyr from Germany murdered near Arras in France.

June 5

Adalar (Adalher) June 5
+ 755. A companion of St Boniface with whom he was martyred in Dokkum in Holland.

Boniface June 5
c 675-754. Born in Crediton in Devon in England, his baptismal name was Winfrid. At the age of five he entered the monastery in Exeter. In 718 he left England for Germany as a missionary and enlightened Bavaria, Hesse, Friesland, Thuringia and Franconia. In 723 Pope Gregory II consecrated him bishop with full jurisdiction over the Germanies. In 731 he became Metropolitan beyond the Rhine and in 747 Archbishop of Mainz. He established many monasteries and convents, including Fulda, where his relics are still venerated. He put these monasteries under the charge of English monks and nuns. He was also responsible for reorganising the corrupt Frankish Church. He was martyred in his old age, with fifty-two companions, ain Dokkum in Holland. He is known as the Apostle of Germany.

Eoban June 5
+ 754. Born in Ireland, he preached with Sts Willibrord and Boniface in Holland and Germany and shared in the latter’s martyrdom in Dokkum.

Felix of Fritzlar June 5
+ c 790. A monk at Fritzlar in Germany and a martyr, probably at the hands of heathen.

Florentius, Julian, Cyriacus, Marcellinus and Faustinus June 5
+ 250. Martyrs beheaded in Perugia in central Italy under Decius.

Meinwerk June 5
+ 1036. He became Bishop of Paderborn in Germany in 1009. On account of his building activities, he was called ‘the bishop-builder’.

Sancho (Sanctius, Sancius) June 5
+ 851. Born in Albi in France, he was taken to Cordoba in Spain as a prisoner of war, educated at the Moorish court, and enrolled in the guards of the Emir. He was martyred by impalement for his refusal to embrace Islam.

Tudno June 5
6th cent. Llandudno in Wales is named after him.

Waccar, Gundekar, Elleher, Hathawulf June 5
+ 754. Monks martyred with St Boniface in Germany.

June 6

Alexander June 6
+ 590. Bishop of Fiesole in Italy, he was a brave defender of the Church against the Kings of Lombardy. His opponents waylaid him and drowned him in the River Reno near Bologna.

Amantius, Alexander and Companions June 6
? Four brothers and priests. Amantius was a Bishop of Noyon in France, who converted Cannes near Carcassonne and where he was martyred with the three others.

Artemius, Candida and Paulina June 6
+ 302. Artemius, a jailer in one of the Roman prisons, with his wife Candida and daughter Paulina, was converted to Christ by St Peter the exorcist and baptised by St Marcellinus. Artemius was beheaded and his wife and daughter buried alive under a pile of stones.

Ceratius (Cérase) June 6
+ c 455. Bishop of Grenoble in France.

Claudius (Claude) of Besançon June 6
+ c 699. Born in Franche-Comté, in France, he became a priest and monk and then Abbot of Condat in the Jura mountains. In 685 he became Bishop of Besançon. After his repose his monastery became known as Saint-Claude.

Cocca (Cucca, Cuach) June 6
? Patron-saint of Kilcock on the borders of Cos. Meath and Kildare in Ireland.

Eustorgius June 6
+ 518. He became Bishop of Milan in Italy in 512 and spent large amounts of money paying the ransoms of many of his flock who had been taken prisoner by barbarians.

Gudwall (Curval) June 6
6th cent. A bishop from Wales who founded monasteries in Devon and Cornwall. By many he is said to be the Gurval who succeeded St Malo at Aleth in Brittany. His relics are venerated in Ghent in Belgium.

Jarlath June 6
+ c 550. First Bishop of Tuam in Connaught in Ireland, where he established a monastery of which St Brendan of Clonard and St Colman of Cloyne were monks.

John of Verona June 6
7th cent. The successor of St Maurus in Verona in Italy.

Vincent of Bevagna June 6
+ 303. First Bishop of Bevagna in Umbria in Italy martyred under Diocletian.

June 7

Aventinus June 7
+ 732. Born in Bagnères in the Pyrenees in France, he became a hermit in the valley of Larboush, where the Saracens martyred him.

Colman of Dromore June 7
6th cent. Probably born in Ireland, he became Bishop of Dromore in Co. Down. By tradition he was the teacher of St Finnian of Clonard.

Deochar (Theutger or Gottlieb) June 7
+ 847. A hermit in Franconia in Germany, he became the first abbot of the monastery of Herriedon.

Marcellinus Apr 26 (In the East June 7)
+ 304. A Pope of Rome, who may have been martyred in repentance for his previous errors.

Marcellus Jan 16 (June 7 in the East)
+ 309. Pope of Rome from 308 to 309 and suffered for confessing the faith.

Meriadec June 7
+ c 886 (?) Born in Wales, he became a hermit and later Bishop of Vannes in Brittany.

Odo of Massay June 7
+ 967. Abbot of Massay in France (935-967).

Paul of Constantinople June 7
+ 350. An Archbishop of Constantinople whose episcopate was largely spent in exile for Orthodoxy. Elected in 336, he was exiled to Pontus in 337, from where he returned in 338, but was exiled again by an Arian Council, this time to Trier in Germany. He returned in c 340, but in 342 was sent in chains to Mesopotamia by the Emperor Constantius. Recalled in 344, he was banished for the last time to Cukusus in Armenia, where he was left without food for six days and then strangled.

Peter, Wallabonsus, Sabinian, Wistremundus, Habentius and Jeremiah June 7
+ 851. Peter was a priest; Wallabonsus, a deacon; Sabinian and Wistremundus, monks of St Zoilus in Cordoba in Spain; Habentius, a monk of St Christopher’s; Jeremiah, a very old man, had founded the monastery of Tábanos, near Cordoba. For publicly denouncing Mohammed they were martyred under Abderrahman in Cordoba. Jeremiah was scourged to death; the others were beheaded.

Vulphy (Wulflagius) June 7
+ c 643. A priest near Abbeville in the north of France who lived and reposed as a hermit. He was greatly venerated in Montreuil-sur-Mer.

June 8

Bron June 8
+ c 511. A disciple of St Patrick and Bishop of Cassel-Irra near Sligo in Ireland.

Clodulf (Clou) June 8
605-696. Son of St Arnulf, Bishop of Metz. He too became Bishop of Metz, succeeding his father in 656 and was bishop for forty years.

Eustadiola June 8
+ 690. Born in Bourges in France, as a widow she spent her fortune building the convent of Moyenmoutier, where she became a nun and abbess.

Gildard (Godard) June 8
+ 514. Bishop of Rouen in France for some fifteen years.

Heraclius of Sens June 8
+ c 515. The fourteenth Bishop of Sens in France. He was present in the Cathedral in Rheims at the baptism of Clovis and built the monastery of St John the Evangelist in Sens.

Levan June 8
6th cent. Perhaps from Wales, he came to Cornwall and gave his name to St Levan.

Maximinus of Aix June 8
1st cent. (?) Venerated as the first Bishop of Aix in Provence in France.

Medard June 8
c 470-c 558. Born in Picardy in the north of France, he was ordained at the age of thirty-three. In 530 he became Bishop of Vermand, later Noyon and then Tournai in Belgium.

Melania the Elder June 8
c 342-c 410. An aristocrat of Rome who visited the Holy Land, founding a monastery on the Mount of Olives.

Muirchu (Maccutinus) June 8
7th cent. A holy man in Ireland who wrote Lives of St Brigid and St Patrick.

Sallustian June 8
? A saint honoured in Sardinia from time immemorial. By some he is described as a martyr, by others as a hermit.

Severinus June 8
+ 550. Bishop of Septempeda, now called after him Sanseverino in the Marches of Ancona in Italy. He and his brother Victorinus distributed their wealth among the poor and became hermits at Montenero. They were forced by Pope Vigilius to become bishops, the former of Septempeda, the latter of Camerino. Severinus reposed shortly before Septempeda was destroyed by the Ostrogoth Totila.

Syra (Syria) June 8
7th cent. By tradition, the sister of St Fiacre (Fiaker) who followed her brother from Ireland to France and lived as an anchoress there.

Victorinus June 8
+ 543. Brother of St Severino, Bishop of San Severino in Italy, with whom he lived as a hermit near Ancona.

June 9

Baithin (Comin, Cominus) June 9
+ c 598 By tradition a cousin of St Columba, he succeeded him as Abbot of Iona in Scotland. He reposed on the anniversary of St Columba’s repose.

Columba (Colum, Coim, Columbkill, Columcille, Columbus, Combs) June 9
c 521-597. Born in Garton in Co. Donegal, he became a monk at Glasnevin and was ordained priest. The rest of his life was spent founding monasteries and churches, in Ireland and Scotland. On Whitsun Eve 563 he landed with twelve companions on the island of Iona (Holy Island), where he established the most famous of his monasteries, which became vital in the conversion of the Picts, the Scots and the Northern English. His biographer and successor, Adamnan, wrote that: ‘He had the face of an angel, was of an excellent nature, polished in speech, holy in deed, great in counsel … loving to all’. His relics were transferred to Dunkeld in 849 and his ‘Cathach’, a copy of the Psalms in his own hand, still exists.

Cummian (Cumian, Cummin) June 9
1st half 8th cent. Born in Ireland, he became a bishop. He visited Bobbio in Italy and lived there as a monk.

Maximian of Syracuse June 9
+ 594. Born in Sicily, he became a monk at St Andrew’s on the Coelian Hill in Rome with St Gregory the Great. He served as papal ambassador in Constantinople. Recalled to Rome, he finally became Bishop of Syracuse.

Primus and Felician June 9
+ c 297. Two elderly brothers beheaded under Diocletian on the Via Nomentana in Rome.

Vincent of Agen June 9
+ ? c 292. A deacon martyred by pagans at Agen in Gascony in France.

June 10

Aresius, Rogatius and Companions June 10
? A group of seventeen martyrs in North Africa.

Bardo June 10
982-1053. Born in Oppershofen in Germany, he became a monk at Fulda. In 1029 he became Abbot of Werden on the Ruhr and in 1031 Abbot of Hersfeld and also Archbishop of Mainz. He was noted for his ascetic life, his love for the poor and for animals.

Basilides, Tripos, Mandal and Companions June 10
270-275. A group of twenty-three Orthodox martyred in Rome on the Aurelian Way under Aurelian.

Censurius June 10
+ 486. The successor of St Germanus as Bishop of Auxerre in France. He was bishop from 448 on.

Crispulus and Restitutus June 10
1st cent. Martyrs under Nero, either in Rome or else in Spain.

Evermund (Ebremund) June 10
+ c 720. Born in Bayeux in France, he married but with his wife’s consent founded several monasteries and convents, including Fontenay-Louvet near Séez, where he became monk and abbot. His wife had entered a convent as a nun.

Getulius, Caerealis, Amantius and Primitivus June 10
+ c 120. By tradition Getulius was the husband of St Symphorosa. He, his brother Amantius, and the two officers sent to capture him and converted by him, were clubbed to death in Tivoli in Italy under Hadrian.

Illadan (Illathan, Iolladhan) June 10
6th cent. Bishop of Rathlihen in Offaly in Ireland.

Ithamar June 10
+ c 656. Born in Kent, he was the first English bishop and succeeded St Paulinus as Bishop of Rochester in England.

Landericus June 10
+ 1050 (?). A monk at Novalese in Savoy in Italy, drowned in the River Arc by evildoers.

Landericus June 10
+ c 661. Bishop of Paris in France from 650. He founded the first hospital – Hôtel-Dieu – in Paris.

Maurinus June 10
? Probably Abbot of St Pantaleon in Cologne in Germany, where he was martyred.

Maximus June 10
4th cent. Tenth Bishop of Naples in Italy (359). He reposed in exile and is honoured as a martyr.

Oliva (Olivia, Olive) June 10
? A virgin martyr who was venerated in Palermo in Sicily and in Carthage in North Africa.

June 11

Blitharius (Blier) June 11
7th cent. Born in Scotland, he went to France and settled in Seganne in Champagne.

Felix and Fortunatus June 11
+ 296 Two brothers, born in Vicenza in Italy, who suffered under Diocletian in Aquileia.

Herebald (Herband) June 11
8th cent. Born in Britain, he lived as a hermit in Brittany where a church is dedicated to him.

Tochumra June 11
? A holy virgin venerated in Kilmore in Ireland. She was called on by women in labour.

June 12

Gerebald June 12
+ 885. Bishop of Châlons-sur-Seine in France (864-885).

Leo III June 12
+ 816. Born in Rome, he became Pope of Rome in 795. He suffered much from political factions in Rome and was himself seized and tortured. Leo refused to add the filioque to the Nicene Creed.

Odulphus June 12
+ c 855. Born in Brabant in Belgium, he went to Utrecht in Holland and helped enlighten Frisia, founding a monastery.

Ternan June 12
? 5th cent. An early missionary bishop among the Picts in Scotland. He is said to have lived in Abernethy and been consecrated by St Palladius. He founded the monastery of Culross in Fifeshire.

June 13

Damhnade June 13
? A holy virgin in Ireland who was greatly venerated in Cavan in Fermanagh.

Fandilas June 13
+ 853. A priest and Abbot of Peñamelaria near Cordoba in Spain. He was beheaded in Cordoba by order of the Emir Mohammed.

Felicula June 13
+ c 90. A virgin-martyr in Rome under Domitian. She was left for a fortnight in prison without food or drink and was thrown into a ditch to die. Her body was recovered by St Nicomedes.

Fortunatus and Lucian June 13
? Martyrs in North Africa.

Peregrinus (Cetheus) June 13
+ c 600. Bishop of L’Aquila in the Abruzzi in Italy. He was drowned in the River Aterno by the Arian Lombards for asking for mercy for a condemned prisoner.

Rambert (Ragnebert, Ragnobert) June 13
+ c 680. A courtier in Austrasia in the east of France, he was murdered by the tyrant Ebroin in the Jura mountains. He has always been honoured as a martyr.

June 14

Anastasius, Felix and Digna June 14
+ 853. Anastasius was a deacon of the church of St Acisclus in Cordoba in Spain, who became a monk at Tábanos near the same town. Felix was born in Alcalá of a Berber family, became a monk in Asturias but joined the monastery at Tábanos, hoping for martyrdom. Digna belonged to the convent there. The three were among the first to confess Christ in Cordoba and were beheaded by order of the Caliph.

Cearan (Ciaran) June 14
+ 870. Abbot of Bellach-Duin, now Castle Kerrant, in Ireland. He was called the devout.

Dogmael June 14
5th-6th cent. A monk who lived in Dyfed and Anglesey in Wales and also in Brittany.

Etherius June 14
+ c 6th cent. Bishop of Vienne in France.

Gerold June 14
+ 806. A monk of Fontenelle and from 787 Bishop of Evreux in France.

Hartwig June 14
+ 1023. Twenty-first Archbishop of Salzburg in Austria (991-1023).

Lotharius June 14
c 756. Founder of a monastery in the forest of Argentan in France which was later called Saint-Loyer-des-Champs after him. He then became Bishop of Séez for thirty-two years.

Marcian of Syracuse June 14
+ c 255? According to Sicilian tradition he was the first ‘Bishop of the West’, sent to Syracuse in Sicily by the Apostle Peter. It is more likely that Marcian was sent to Sicily in the third century. He was martyred by Jews who threw him from a tower.

Mark of Lucera June 14
+ c 328 A bishop venerated locally in the south of Italy.

Nennus (Nenus, Nehemias) June 14
7th cent. He succeeded St Enda as abbot of the monasteries of the Isles of Arran and Bute in Ireland.

Psalmodius (Psalmet, Saumon, Saumay) June 14
7th cent. Probably born in Ireland, he was a disciple of St Brendan. He moved to France and lived as a hermit near Limoges.

Quintian June 14
? A bishop in France.

Richard of St Vannes June 14
+ 1046. Called ‘Gratia Dei, ‘Thanks be to God’, from a phrase he often said. He became a monk at St Vannes in Verdun in the north of France.

Valerius and Rufinus June 14
+ c 287. Martyrs in Soissons in France.

June 15

Abraham June 15
+ c 480. Born on the banks of the Euphrates, he travelled to Egypt, where he fell among thieves who held him prisoner for five years. He escaped and travelled to France. There he settled near Clermont in Auvergne as a hermit. Eventually he became abbot of the monastery of St Cyriacus (St Cyrgnes). He is called on in prayer against fever.

Benildis June 15
+ 853. A woman of Cordoba in Spain who was so moved by the courage of the priest Athanasius during his martyrdom at the hands of the Moors, that she braved death at the stake on the following day. Her ashes were thrown into the Guadalquivir.

Constantine June 15
+ c 706. A monk with St Philibert at Jumièges in France and then Bishop of Beauvais.

Domitian and Hadelin June 15
+ c 686. Two disciples of St Landelinus at Lobbes in Belgium.

Edburgh (Edburga) of Winchester June 15
+ 960. Daughter of Edward the Elder and granddaughter of Alfred the Great, she was placed as a child in the convent which King Alfred’s widow had founded in Winchester in England. Her shrine in Pershore in Worcestershire was famous for its miracles.

Landelinus June 15
c 625-686. Born near Bapaume, Landelinus lived for a time as a robber, but he repented and became a monk. He was later ordained and founded monasteries in France and Belgium, at Lobbes in 654, Aulne (656), Walers (657) and Crespin (Crepy) in 670.

Melan June 15
+ c 549. Bishop of Viviers in France from 519 on.

Trillo (Drillo, Drel) June 15
6th cent. Patron saint of two places in Gwynedd in Wales.

Vitus (Guy), Modestus and Crescentia June 15
+ c 303? Fleeing from Sicily, they were all martyred in Italy under Diocletian. St Vitus is called on in prayer against epilepsy and the nervous disorder called St Vitus’s dance.

Vouga (Vougar, Veho, Feock, Fiech) June 15
6th cent. A bishop from Ireland who settled in Brittany and lived there as a hermit near Lesneven.

June 16

Actinea and Graecina June 16
4th cent. Both martyrs, the former was beheaded in Volterra in Italy under Diocletian.

Aurelian June 16
+ c 550. He became Bishop of Arles in France in 546. He founded two monastic houses, one for monks and one for nuns, and drew up for each a rule, based on that of St Caesarius.

Aureus, Justina and Companions June 16
During an invasion of the Huns, Aureus, Bishop of Mainz in Germany, was driven from his diocese and was followed by his sister, Justina, and others. After they returned, he and the others were martyred in church while celebrating the liturgy.

Berthaldus (Bertaud) June 16
+ c 540. A hermit in the Ardennes in France, he was ordained priest by St Remigius.

Cettin (Cethagh) June 16
5th cent. A disciple of St Patrick of Ireland and consecrated bishop by him.

Colman McRoi June 16
6th cent. A deacon who was a disciple of St Columba. He also founded a monastery at Reachrain, now Lambay Island, near Dublin in Ireland.

Curig June 16
6th cent. Bishop of Llanbadarn in Wales, where several churches are dedicated to him.

Felix and Maurus June 16
6th cent. Born in Palestine, after a pilgrimage to Rome, this father and son lived as hermits at what is now called San Felice near Narni in central Italy.

Ferreolus and Ferrutio June 16
+ c 212. Ferreolus, a priest, and Ferrutio, a deacon, were brothers from Asia Minor. They were sent by St Irenaeus of Lyons to enlighten the area round Besançon in France, where they preached for thirty years and were finally martyred.

Ismael June 16
6th cent. A disciple of St Teilo in Wales, he was consecrated bishop by him.

Similian (Sambin) June 16
+ 310. Third Bishop of Nantes in France. St Gregory of Tours testified to his holiness.

Simplicius of Bourges June 16
+ 477. He was the father of a large family when the local bishops chose him to be Bishop of Bourges in France. He defended the Church against the Arian Visigoths.

June 17

Avitus (Avy) June 17
+ c 530. First of all a monk at Menat in Auvergne in France, then Abbot of Micy near Orleans, and finally a hermit in the Perche, where he was forced by his numerous disciples to build and become abbot of a new monastery.

Botulf and Adulf (Botolph and Adolph) June 17
7th cent. Brothers and monks in England. Though little is known of Adulf, Botulf founded a monastery at Iken in Suffolk and was famed for his piety. Over seventy churches were dedicated to St Botulf, including four at the gates of the City of London.

Briavel June 17
6th cent. A hermit at St Briavels, now in Gloucestershire in England.

Gundulphus June 17
6th cent. A bishop in France who is said to have reposed in Bourges.

Herveus (Hervé) June 17
+ c 575. Blind from childhood, he was born in Wales but was taken when very young to Brittany. Though blind, he became Abbot of Plouvien, from where he moved with some of his monks to Lanhouarneau.

Himerius June 17
+ c 560. Born in Calabria in Italy, he became a monk and then Bishop of Ameila in Umbria. He is described as a great ascetic. In 995 his relics were translated to Cremona where he is one of the main patron-saints.

Molling (Moling, Myllin, Molignus, Dairchilla) June 17
+ 697. Born in Wexford in Ireland, he became a monk at Glendalough and afterwards Abbot of Aghacainid (Teghmolin, St Mullins). Later he succeeded St Aidan as Bishop of Ferns.

Montanus June 17
+ c 300. A soldier who was taken to the island of Ponza in Italy and martyred by being thrown into the sea with a heavy stone tied round his neck. Christians recovered his body and enshrined it in Gaeta.

Nectan June 17
6th cent. Born in Wales, he is the patron saint of Hartland in Devon, now in England, where he was a hermit.

Rambold (Ramnold) June 17
+ 1001. A monk at St Maximinus in Trier in Germany, he Abbot of St Emmeram in Regensburg. He reposed at the age of one hundred.

Rome (Martyrs of) June 17
? A group of two hundred and sixty-two martyrs who suffered under Diodetian and buried on the old Via Salaria in Rome.

June 18

Alena June 18
+ c 640. Born of pagan parents near Brussels in Belgium, Alena was baptised without their knowledge. She was put to death while secretly going to the liturgy.

Amandus June 18
+ c 431. Successor of St Delphinus as Bishop of Bordeaux in France (c 404). He is mainly known from the works of St Paulinus of Nola whom he converted.

Calogerus the Anchorite June 18
+ c 486. A Greek who lived for thirty-five years as a hermit near Girgenti in Sicily after preaching Christ in the isles of Lipari.

Cyriacus and Paula June 18
+ 305. Two Christians, stoned to death in Málaga in Spain under Diocletian.

Fortunatus the Philosopher June 18
+ c 569. A bishop driven from the north of Italy by the Lombards.

Gregory, Demetrius and Calogerus June 18
+ 5th cent. Respectively a bishop, an archdeacon and an abbot in North Africa, from where they were driven out by Arian Vandals. They settled in Fragalata near Messina in Sicily and preached the Gospel there. They are honoured as the patron-saints of Fragalata.

Guy June 18
+ c 940 The successor of St Berno at Baume in France. About the year 940 he resigned and lived as a hermit near Fay-en-Bresse.

Mark and Marcellian June 18
+ c 287. Twin brothers and deacons who suffered in Rome under Maximian Herculeus.

Osmanna (Osanna) June 18
+ c 700. A nun at the convent of Jouarre in France.

June 19

Bruno-Boniface June 19 and Oct 15
+ 1009. Born in Querfurt in Germany, he accompanied the half-Greek Emperor Otto III to Italy in 996 and became a monk there. He became Archbishop of Mersburg and was sent to enlighten the heathen Prussians. He was martyred with eighteen companions.

Deodatus (Dié, Didier, Dieu-Donné, Adéodat) June 19
+ c 680. A bishop who founded and was abbot of the monastery of Val-de-Galilée – Jointures in France.

Deodatus June 19
+ 679. Bishop of Nevers in France in 655, he later lived as a hermit in the Vosges. Later he founded a monastery at Ebersheimmünster near Strasbourg.

Gaudentius, Culmatius and Companions June 19
+ 364. Gaudentius, a bishop, and Culmatius, his deacon, were martyred in Tuscany in Italy under Valentinian I. With them suffered Andrew, a layman, with his wife and children and a group of fifty-three companions.

Gervase and Protase June 19
? 2nd cent. In 386, during the episcopate of St Ambrose, the relics of Sts Gervase and Protase, the protomartyrs of the city, were discovered in Milan in Italy.

Hildegrin June 19
+ c 827. Younger brother of St Ludger, whom he helped in enlightening the Saxons. He became Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne in France and then Abbot of Werden in Germany.

Innocent June 19
+ 559. Bishop of Le Mans in France for over forty years.

Romuald June 19
c 951-1027. Born in Ravenna in Italy, in his youth he saw his father commit a murder and resolved to repent for it by becoming a monk at Classe near Ravenna. In 996 he became abbot of that monastery. However, he left it in 999 and led a wandering life, establishing hermitages and monasteries, among them Camaldoli near Arezzo in 1009.

Ursicinus June 19
+ c 67. A doctor in Ravenna in Italy. Sentenced to death for being a Christian, he wavered but was encouraged by the soldier St Vitalis and accepted martyrdom.

Zosimus June 19
+ 110. A martyr in Spoleto in Umbria in Italy under Trajan.

June 20

Adalbert June 20
+ 981. A monk at St Maximin in Trier in Germany, he went to preach to the pagans. In 961 all his companions were killed by them and he only escaped with difficulty. He then became Abbot of Weissenburg and in 968 the first Archbishop of Magdeburg with jurisdiction over the western Slavs or Sorbs.

Alban June 20
c 303. Venerated as the Protomartyr of Britain. He was a citizen of Verulam, now in England, converted by a persecuted priest whom he had sheltered in his house. He was executed on Holmhurst Hill and on this site was built the monastery of St Alban’s, by which name Verulam has since been known.

Bain (Bainus, Bagnus) June 20
+ c 710. A monk at Fontenelle in France, he became Bishop of Thérouanne. After twelve years he returned to Fontenelle and later became abbot. He is the main patron-saint of Calais.

Florentina (Florence) June 20
+ c 636. Born in Carthagena in Spain, she was the only sister of Sts Leander, Fulgentius and Isidore. Losing her parents at an early age, she was placed under the guardianship of St Leander. She went to a convent where she later became abbess.

Goban (Gobain) June 20
+ 670. Born in Ireland and a disciple of St Fursey, he became a monk with him at Burgh Castle in Suffolk. He followed his abbot to France and they lived as hermits in the forest near the Oise. He was murdered by barbarians at the place now called Saint Gobain.

Govan (Goven, Cofen) June 20
6th cent. A hermit who lived halfway down a cliff at St Govan’s Head in Dyfed in Wales where his stone hut can still be seen. He is probably buried under the altar in the hut, which later became a small chapel. Govan was probably a disciple of St Ailbe.

Helen (Heliada) June 20
+ c 750. Abbess of the convent of Oehren in Trier in Germany.

Novatus June 20
+ c 151. Son of Pudens, senator of Rome, and brother of Sts Praxedes and Pudentiana.

June 21

Agofredus June 21
+ 738. Brother of St Leutfrid (Leffroi) and monk at Holy Cross (La-Croix-Saint-Leuffroi), a monastery near Evreux in the north of France.

Alban June 21
+ c 400. A Greek priest from Naxos, he was sent into exile by the Arians and preached the Gospel in Germany around Mainz. Here he was again attacked by the Arians and martyred.

Corbmac June 21
6th cent. A disciple of St Columba and Abbot of Durrow in Ireland.

Demetria June 21
+ 363. A virgin-martyr in Rome, sister of St Bibiana and daughter of Sts Flavian and Dafrosa.

Dominic of Comacchio June 21
+ c 820. A monk at Comacchio near Venice in Italy.

Engelmund June 21
+ c 739. Born in England, he became a monk at a very early age and then priest and abbot. He went to Friesland in Holland where he successfully preached with St Willibrord at Velsen, six miles north of Haarlem.

Leutfrid (Leufroi) June 21
+ 738. Founder of the monastery La Croix-Saint-Ouen (later called Saint-Leufroy) near Evreux in France where he was abbot for nearly fifty years. He cared for poor children.

Maine (Mevenus, Mewan, Meen) June 21
+ 617. Born in Cornwall or Wales, he was a disciple of St Samson, whom he accompanied to Brittany. There he founded the monastery known as Saint-Méon.

Martin of Tongres June 21
+ c 350. Seventh Bishop of Tongres in Belgium, he is venerated as the Apostle of the Hesbaye region in Brabant.

Ralph June 21
+ 866. He became a monk at the monastery of Solignac in France and later Abbot of St Medard in Soissons. In 840 he became Bishop of Bourges, founding monasteries and doing good works.

Rufinus and Martia June 21
? Martyrs in one of the early persecutions in Syracuse in Sicily.

Urciscenus June 21
+ c 216. Seventh Bishop of Pavia in Italy c 183-216.

Wolfrid June 21
+ c 990. Founder of the monastery of Hohentwiel in Germany.

June 22

Aaron June 22
+ c 552. Probably born in Wales, he went to Brittany and lived as a hermit at what is now St Malo. Later he was joined by disciples, among them St Malo, and he became their abbot.

Consortia June 22
+ ? 570. She founded a convent in France endowed by King Clotaire after she miraculously healed his dying daughter. She was venerated at Cluny.

Flavius Clemens June 22
+ c 96. Brother of the Emperor Vespasian and uncle of Titus and Domitian, whose niece, Flavia Domitilla, he married. In the year 95 he held consular office together with Domitian. The following year Domitian had him beheaded for the Orthodox Faith.

John I of Naples June 22
5th cent. Bishop of Naples in Italy.

John IV of Naples June 22
+ 835. Known as ‘the Peacemaker’, he was Bishop of Naples in Italy, where he is venerated as a patron-saint.

Paulinus of Nola June 22
c 354-431. Pontius Meropius Amcius Paulinus was born in Bordeaux in France, the son of a Roman patrician. Appointed prefect of Rome, after the death of his only child in 390 he left the world and went to Spain, where the people of Barcelona forced him to accept the priesthood. Finally he settled as a hermit near Nola in Campania in Italy and there the people chose him as their bishop (400). He proved to be one of the finest bishops of his age. He suffer greatly during the invasion of Campania by the Goths under Alaric. Most of his writings survive.

Rotrudis June 22
+ c 869. A saint whose relics were enshrined at Saint Bertin in Saint Omer in France.

June 23

Agrippina June 23
+ c 262. A virgin-martyr in Rome, probably under Valerian. She was especially venerated by Sicilians and Greeks, both having relics, the former in Mineo and the latter in Constantinople.

Audrey (Etheldred, Etheldreda) June 23
+ 679. Born in Suffolk in England, she was a daughter of King Anna of East Anglia and a sister of Sts Saxburgh, Ethelburgh and Withburgh. Twice married, she remained a virgin. She became a nun at Coldingham and then went to Ely where she became abbess. She lived a life of great holiness and simplicity. Her body remained incorrupt after death and her hand-relic survives in Ely to this day.

Felix of Sutri June 23
+ 257. A priest of Sutri in Tuscany in Italy, scourged to death under Valerian and Gallienus.

Hidulf June 23
+ c 707. Count of Hainault in Belgium, he married St Aye, but by mutual consent they entered monasteries. Hidulf became a monk at Lobbes which he had helped to found.

James of Toul June 23
+ 769. Probably born in Bertigny in Haute Marne, he became a monk at Hornbach, before he became Bishop of Toul in the east of France in 756.

John June 23
+ 362. A priest in Rome, beheaded under Julian the Apostate.

Moeliai (Moelray) June 23
+ c 493. Born in Ireland and baptised by St Patrick, he became Abbot of Nendrum.

Walhere June 23
? A priest in Belgium murdered for his righteousness and venerated as a martyr.

June 24

Agoard, Agilbert and Companions June 24
5th to 7th cent. Holy martyrs in Creteil, now a suburb of Paris in France.

Faustus and Companions June 24
? Twenty-four martyrs in Rome.

Germoc June 24
6th cent. Born in Ireland, he was the brother of St Breaca and settled near Mount’s Bay in Cornwall.

Henry (Heric) June 24
+ c 880. Born in Hery in Yonne in France, he became a monk at Saint-Germain d’Auxerre.

Ivan June 24
9th cent. He renounced a brilliant position at the court of Czechia to become a hermit. He was buried by St Ludmilla.

John of Tuy June 24
9th cent. Born in Galicia in Spain, he lived as a hermit near Tuy, where his relics are still enshrined.

Rumoldus (Rumbold) June 24
+ c 775. Probably from England, he was a monk who became a bishop with St Willibrord in Holland and in Brabant in Belgium. He was murdered near Malines.

Simplicius of Autun June 24
+ c 360. A married man who lived a virginal life with his wife and became Bishop of Autun. He worked zealously and successfully to uproot paganism in his diocese.

Theodulphus (Thiou) June 24
+ 776. Third Abbot of Lobbes in Belgium.

June 25

Adalbert June 25
+ c 740. Born in Northumbria in England, he became a monk at Rathmelgisi in Ireland and accompanied St Willibrord as a deacon to Frisia. He worked around Egmont in Holland and became the patron-saint there.

Eurosia (Orosia) June 25
+ 714. Born in Bayonne in France, she was martyred by the Saracens in Jaca in the Pyrenees in Spain. She was also venerated in the south of France and in the north of Italy.

Gallicanus June 25
+ c 362. An officer in the army of Constantine and a consul in Rome, he went to live in Ostia where he founded a hospital and ministered to the sick.

Gallicanus June 25
+ c 541. The fifth Bishop of Embrun in France.

Gohardus June 25
+ 843. Bishop of Nantes in France, he was martyred by raiding Normans while celebrating the liturgy. Many monks and priests suffered with him.

Maximus of Turin June 25
+ c 470. Bishop of Turin during the barbarian invasions of the north of Italy. He is remembered for his homilies and other ascetic writings, which survive.

Moloc (Molluog, Murlach, Lugaidh) June 25
+ c 572. Born in Scotland, he went to Ireland and then returned to his native land as a missionary. His main work as a bishop was the enlightenment of the Hebrides. He died in Rossmarkie but his shrine was in Mortlach.

Molonachus June 25
7th cent. A disciple of St Brendan, he became Bishop of Lismore in Argyle in Scotland.

Prosper of Reggio June 25
+ c 466. Bishop of Reggio in Emilia in Italy, venerated as the main patron-saint of the city.

Selyf (Selyr, Levan) June 25
6th cent. ? A hermit in St Levan in Cornwall.

Solomon I June 25
5th cent. By tradition he was born in Cornwall, the husband of St Gwen and father of St Cuby (Cybi). He lived in Brittany and was murdered by heathen.

Solomon III (Selyf) June 25
+ 874. King of Brittany and a brave warrior against Franks and Northmen alike. The Bretons count him among their national heroes. He repented for the crimes of his youth and when he was murdered, he was proclaimed a martyr.

June 26

Barbolenus June 26
+ c 677. A monk at Luxeuil and afterwards first Abbot of St Peter’s, later St Maur-des-Fossés, in the north of France.

Corbican June 26
8th cent. Born in Ireland, he lived as a hermit in Holland and helped simple people.

Hermogius June 26
+ c 942. Born in Tuy in Spain, he founded the monastery of Labrugia in Galicia in 915. He was taken prisoner by the Moors and taken to Cordoba, but was later freed. His nephew, St Pelagius, was kept as a hostage.

John and Paul June 26
? Martyrs who suffered in Rome.

Maxentius (Maixent) June 26
c 448-515. Born in Agde in the south of France, he became a monk at a monastery in Poitou, now called after him Saint-Maixent, where he later became abbot. He was highly esteemed by the local population whom he protected from the invading barbarians.

Pelagius (Pelayo) June 26
c 912-925. A young boy from Asturias in Spain left as a hostage with the Moors in Cordoba. He was offered freedom and other rewards if he would accept Islam. These inducements were repeatedly put before him during the three years that he was kept in prison. On his stubborn refusal, he was tortured, which he endured for six hours before finally reposing. His relics were transferred to Leon in 967 and to Oviedo in 985.

Perseveranda (Pecinna, Pezaine) June 26
+ c 726. A holy virgin from Spain who with her sisters Macrina and Columba travelled to Poitiers in France where they founded a convent. While fleeing from a robber, Perseveranda died at a place called after her, Sainte-Pezaine.

Salvius and Superius June 26
+ c 768. Salvius was a bishop near Angouleme in France who was sent to Valenciennes to enlighten the Flemish. The greed of a noble led to his death and he was hastily buried beneath a martyred companion. When the relics were discovered his anonymous companion was found first and called ‘Superius’.

Vigilius June 26
+ 405. A Roman noble who studied in Athens. He became Bishop of Trent in Italy and more or less succeeded in uprooting paganism. He was stoned to death in the Val di Rendena for overturning a statue of Saturn.

June 27

Clement June 27
+ c 298 A martyr in Cordoba in Spain under Diocletian. He belongs to the group led by St Zoilus.

Deodatus June 27
+ 473. Deacon of St Paulinus of Nola in Italy and later his successor.

John of Chinon June 27
6th cent. Born in Brittany, he became a hermit in Chinon in the west of France. Here he became the spiritual father of Queen Radegund.

Zoilus and Companions June 27
+ c 301. A youth martyred in Cordoba in Spain under Diocletian. The monastery of San Zoil de Carrión in León in Spain was founded to enshrine his relics.

June 28

Argymirus June 28
+ 858. Born in Cabra near Cordoba in Spain, he held a high position among the Muslims of the city. He was deprived of his office on account of his faith and became a monk. Shortly afterwards he openly renounced Islam, confessed Christ and was beheaded.

Austell June 28
6th cent. A disciple of St Mewan or Mevan of Cornwall. He probably lived in the area where the place-name preserves his memory.

Benignus June 28
6th cent. Bishop of Utrecht in Holland. His relics were uncovered there in 996.

Crummine June 28
5th cent. A disciple of St Patrick at Leccuine (Lackan) in Westmeath in Ireland.

Egilo (Egilon, Eigil) June 28
+ 871. A monk and later Abbot of Prüm near Trier in Germany. He restored the monastery at Flavigny near Dijon and founded the monastery of Corbigny, both in France.

Heimrad June 28
+ 1019. A priest at Baden in Germany who after many pilgrimages lived as a monk at Hersfeld and then as a hermit at Hasungen in Westphalia.

Irenaeus of Lyons June 28
c 130-200. Born in Asia Minor, he was a disciple of St Polycarp, who was a disciple of the Apostle John the Divine. He went to France and became Bishop of Lyons (c 177), where he was later martyred. His writings against Gnosticism are a witness to Apostolic Tradition.

Papias (Papius) June 28
+ c 303. A martyr, possibly in Sicily, under Diocletian.

Paul I June 28
+ 767. Born in Rome, together with his brother, later Pope Stephen, he attended the Lateran School. He succeeded his brother as Pope in 757. His main task was to withstand the iconoclasm of the Emperor Constantine Copronymus. He also enshrined the relics of many saints and built churches.

Theodichildis (Telchildis) June 28
+ c 660. A nun at Faremoutiers in France, she became the first Abbess of Jouarre.

June 29

Benedicta June 29
? Sister of Sts Augustine and Sanctian, all three were born in Spain but went to France and were martyred in Sens under Aurelian.

Cassius of Narni June 29
+ 558. Bishop of Narni in Italy.

Cocha (Coecha) June 29
6th cent. Abbess of Ross-Benchuir in Ireland.

Gemma (Hemma, Emma) June 29
+ 1045. Left a widow, she founded the monastery of Gurk in Carinthia in Austria and became a nun there.

Marcellus and Anastasius June 29
+ 274. Martyred in Bourges in France. Marcellus was beheaded and Anastasius scourged.

Paul the Apostle June 29
c 3-65? Born in Tarsus in Cilicia, a Pharisee, a Roman citizen and a tentmaker by trade, he was originally called Saul and was educated in the Law of the Jews in Jerusalem. After taking part in the stoning of the first Orthodox martyr, St Stephen, he was miraculously converted on the road to Damascus and received his mission to enlighten the Gentiles. He did so in at least four Apostolic journeys, extending perhaps as far as Spain, establishing churches everywhere and surrounded by dangers of all sorts. Nevertheless he was always zealous for Christ. His thirteen letters, addressed mostly to the Churches which he had founded, belong to divine revelation. According to a very old tradition, he was beheaded in Rome, which Church he had founded, near the Ostian Way.

Peter the Apostle June 29
+ c 64. Simon, son of Jonah, was a married fisherman who lived in Bethsaida. He was a disciple of St John the Baptist before he was called, after his elder brother Andrew, to be a disciple of Christ. He was called ‘Rock’ (Cephas, Petros, Petra, Peter) because of his confession of Christ as the Son of God. Peter was a witness of many important events such as the Transfiguration and the Agony in the Garden. After Christ’s Ascension he founded the Church in Antioch and visited the Church in Rome founded by the Apostle Paul. Here he was martyred, head downwards in the circus of Nero, and was buried on the Vatican Hill. He is commemorated together with the Apostle Paul on 29 June and his relics are enshrined beneath the altar of St Peter’s in Rome to this day.

Salome and Judith June 29
9th cent. Salome is said to have been a princess from England who was exiled. She was befriended in Bavaria by a pious widow named Judith. Both became anchoresses at Oberaltaich in Germany.

Syrus of Genoa June 29
+ c 380. Priest and later Bishop of Genoa in Italy from c 324 to c 380. He is the main patron of the city.

June 30

Bertrand June 30
+ 623. Born in Autun in France, he met St Germanus in Paris and later became Bishop of Le Mans. He took a great interest in agriculture and wine-growing and loved the poor.

Clotsindis (Clotsend) June 30
c 635-714. Daughter of St Adalbald and St Rictrudis, who founded the convent of Marchiennes in the north of France. Clotsindis succeeded her mother as second abbess.

Emiliana June 30
? A virgin-martyr in Rome.

Ermentrude (Erentrudis) June 30
+ c 718. A sister or niece of St Rupert, Apostle of Salzburg. She was the first Abbess of Nonnberg in Salzburg, founded for her by Rupert.

Eurgain June 30
6th cent. Foundress of Cor-Eurgain in Wales, later called Llantwit.

First Martyrs of Rome June 30
+ 64. Protomartyrs of Rome. They were falsely charged by Nero with burning down the city and were ordered to undergo various cruel deaths; some were covered with the skins of wild beasts and thrown to wild dogs to be torn apart; others were crucified and when daylight failed were used as human torches. They were all disciples of the Apostles and the first fruits of the martyrs whom the Church of Rome sent to the Lord.

Gaius and Leo June 30
? Martyrs either in North Africa or in Rome, Gaius was a priest and Leo a subdeacon.

Lucina June 30
? An early martyr in Rome.

Marcian June 30
+ c 757. Bishop of Pampeluna in Spain. He was present at the sixth Council of Toledo in 737.

Martial of Limoges, Alpinian and Austriclinian June 30
+ c 250. First Bishop of Limoges in France and Apostle of the Limousin, together with two of his priests.

Ostianus June 30
? A saint venerated at Viviers in France.

JULY 1-31

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://rejoicecelticsaints.wordpress.com

REJOICE CELTIC SAINTS

SAINTS OF MY HEART

honolulu-oahu-hawaii

ORTHODOX SAINTS OF WESTERN EUROPE

JULY

Sources:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/hp.php

ORTHODOX ENGLAND

https://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

Gall July 1
c 489-554. Born in Auvergne in France, he became a monk and was ordained deacon by St Quintian, Bishop of Clermont. He was the uncle and teacher of St Gregory of Tours.

Julius and Aaron and Companions July 1
+ c 305. According to tradition they are the Protomartyrs of Wales and suffered in Caerleon-on-Usk under Diocletian.

Juthware July 1
7th cent. Sister of St Sidwell. She was of British descent and lived in Devon in England.

Leonorious (Lunaire) July 1
+ c 570. A son of Hoel, King of Brittany, but born in Wales and consecrated bishop by St Dyfrig. Once in Brittany, then ruled by his brother Hoel II, he founded the monastery of Pontual, near Saint Malo.

Martin of Vienne July 1
+ c 132. Third Bishop of Vienne in France.

Servan (Serf, Sair) July 1
? The Apostle of West Fife in Scotland who reposed and was buried in Culross.

Theodoric (Thierry, Theodericus) July 1
+ c 533. Abbot of Mont d’Or near Rheims in the north of France.

Veep (Veepus, Veepy, Wimp, Wennapa) July 1
6th cent? Patron saint of St Veep in Cornwall.

July 2

Acestes July 2
1st cent. According to tradition, he was one of the three soldiers who led St Paul to execution in Rome. Converted by him, they were beheaded.

Ariston, Crescentian, Eutychian, Urban, Vitalis, Justus, Felicissimus, Felix, Marcia and Symphorosa July 2
+ c 285. A group of martyrs in the Campagna in the south of Italy under Diocletian.

Monegundis July 2
+ 570. A woman in Chartres in France who became an anchoress after the death of her two daughters. She spent most of her life near Tours.

Oudaceus (Eddogwy) July 2
+ c 615. Born in Brittany, he lived in Wales where he became a bishop near Llandaff.

Processus and Martinian July 2
? Martyrs who were greatly venerated in Rome: their tomb and basilica were on the Aurelian Way. Their relics are in St Peter’s in Rome.

Rome (Martyrs of) July 2
c 68. Three soldiers who were converted at the martyrdom of the Apostle Paul in Rome and then were themselves martyred.

Swithun (Swithin) July 2
+ 862. Born in Wessex in England, he spent his youth at the monastery in Winchester. He became a priest and in 852 Bishop of Winchester. On his repose and at his request, he was buried in the cemetery outside the minster. His relics were translated into the cathedral in 971, many miracles occurring, not least very heavy rainfall which gave rise to the popular saying, ‘St Swithn’s day if thou dost rain, For forty days it will remain’.

July 3

Bladus July 3
? By tradition, he was one of the early bishops of the Isle of Man.

Byblig (Biblig, Peblig, Piblig, Publicius) July 3
? 5th cent. A holy man connected with Carnarvon and honoured in several parts of Wales.

Cillene July 3
+ c 752. Born in Ireland, he went to Iona in Scotland and became abbot there in 726.

Dathus (Datus) July 3
+ 190. Bishop of Ravenna in Italy. His election was due to the miraculous appearance of a dove hovering over his head.

Germanus July 3
+ c 474. By tradition a nephew of St Patrick and a monk in Ireland, Wales and Brittany. Eventually he went to the Isle of Man as a bishop. His memory is still kept here in several place-names in the forms ‘Germain’ and ‘Jarman’.

Gunthiern July 3
+ c 500. A prince in Wales who went to Brittany and lived as a hermit.

Guthagon July 3
8th cent. Born in Ireland, he crossed to Belgium and became a hermit.

Heliodorus July 3
c 332-390. Born in Dalmatia, he helped translate the Vulgate. Later he settled in Aquileia in Italy and became Bishop of Altinum (Altino), a small town since destroyed, near Venice. He was a brave opponent of Arianism.

Irenaeus and Mustiola July 3
+ 273. Irenaeus, a deacon, and Mustiola, a noble lady, were martyred in Chiusi in Tuscany in Italy under Aurelian for ministering to other martyrs and burying their relics.

Leo II July 3
+ 683. Born in Sicily, he became Pope of Rome in 681. During his papacy, the former Pope Honorius I was condemned for not denouncing Monothelitism.

July 4

Aurelian July 4
+ 895. A monk and Abbot of Ainay in France, he later became Archbishop of Lyons.

Bertha July 4
+ c 725. A lady of high station, after her husband’s death she became a nun at the convent of Blangy in Artois in France, which she had founded and where she became abbess.

Finbar July 4
6th cent. An Abbot of Innis-Doimhle in Wexford in Ireland.

Hatto July 4
+ 985. Born of a noble Swabian family, he left all his property to the monastery of Ottobeuren in Germany and became a monk there.

Jucundian July 4
? A martyr in North Africa.

Laurianus July 4
+ ? c 544. Born in Pannonia, now Hungary, he was ordained deacon in Milan in Italy and later became Archbishop of Seville in Spain. He was martyred in Bourges in France.

Namphamon and Companions July 4
+ c? 180. Of Carthaginian descent, he was martyred with several compatriots at Madaura in Numidia in North Africa and called ‘the Archmartyr’.

Oda (Odo) the Good July 4
+ 959. Born in East Anglia of Danish parents, he became a monk at Fleury in France, then Bishop of Ramsbury in England and in 942 Archbishop of Canterbury. As Archbishop he played a prominent role under Kings Edmund and Edgar and paved the way for monastic restoration under Sts Dunstan, Oswald (Oda’s nephew) and Ethelwold.

Procopius July 4 (In the East Apr 1)
c 980-1053. Born in Czechia, he was ordained in Prague. Later he became a hermit and finally founded the monastery of Sazava.

Ulric (Uldaricus, Udalric) July 4
c 890-973. Born in Augsburg in Germany, at the age of seven he was sent to the monastery of St Gall in Switzerland. In 923 he became Bishop of Augsburg and protected his people against the invading Magyars. In his old age he lived as a monk at St Gall. In 993 he became the first person to be canonised by the Pope of Rome.

July 5

Agatho and Triphina July 5
+ c 306. Martyrs in Sicily.

Edana (Etaoin) July 5
? Patron of parishes in the west of Ireland. A famous holy well bears her name. She lived near the confluence of the rivers Boyle and Shannon.

Erfyl (Eurfyl) July 5
? She founded the church of Llanerfyl in Powys in Wales.

Fragan and Gwen (Blanche) July 5
5th cent. They left Britain after the departure of the Romans and were the parents of Sts Winwalöe, Jacut and Guithern. Churches in Brittany are dedicated to them.

Modwenna July 5
+ c 695. She succeeded St Hilda as Abbess of Whitby in England.

Modwenna July 5
7th cent. An anchoress and later Abbess of Polesworth in Warwickshire in England.

Numerian (Memorian) July 5
+ c 666. Son of a rich man in Trier in Germany, he first became a monk at Remiremont in France with St Arnulf and then went to the monastery of Luxeuil with St Waldebert. Later he became Bishop of Trier.

Philomena July 5
+ c 500. A saint venerated in San Severino near Ancona in Italy.

Probus and Grace July 5
? Saints of Cornwall, by tradition husband and wife. The church of Tressilian or Probus, is dedicated to them.

Stephen of Reggio July 5
1st cent. By tradition he was consecrated first Bishop of Reggio in Italy by the Apostle Paul and martyred under Nero. He is the main patron of Reggio.

Triphina July 5
6th cent. The mother of St Tremorus the infant-martyr. She spent the latter years of her life in a convent in Brittany.

Zöe (Zoa) July 5
+ c 286. With a Greek name, she lived in Rome. Married to a high official of the imperial court, she was martyred for the faith.

July 6

Dominica July 6
? A martyr venerated in Campania who suffered under Diocletian.

Goar July 6
+ c 575. A priest from Aquitaine in France, who lived as a hermit near Oberwesel on the Rhine in Germany, now called St Goar.

Monenna (or Darerca) July 6
+ 518. An ascetic and Abbess of Sliabh Cuillin in Ireland.

Noyala July 6
? A holy virgin from Britain beheaded at Beignan in Brittany.

Romulus and Companions July 6
+ c 90. By tradition ordained by the Apostle Peter as first pastor of Fiesole, he was martyred with several companions under Domitian.

Saxburgh (Sexburga) July 6
c 635-c 699. Daughter of Anna, King of East Anglia in England, sister of Sts Etheldred, Ethelburgh and Withburgh and half-sister of St Sethrid. She married Erconbert, King of Kent, and so became mother of Sts Ermenhild and Ercongota. As Queen she founded the convent of Minster in Sheppey. Widowed in 664, she became a nun there, later moving to Ely in 679, where she became abbess.

Tranquillinus July 6
+ c 288. A martyr in Rome connected with St Sebastian.

July 7

Ampelius July 7
+ c 672. Bishop of Milan in Italy under the Lombards. he exerted a great influence for good among the invading Lombards.

Angelelmus July 7
+ 828. Abbot of Sts Gervase and Protase in Auxerre in France and then bishop there.

Apollonius July 7
? An early Bishop of Brescia in Italy.

Bonitus July 7
+ c 582. Fourth Abbot of Montecassino. At this time the Lombards plundered and destroyed the monastery.

Ethelburgh (Ethelburga, Aubierge) July 7
+ c 664. The daughter of Anna, King of East Anglia in England. She became a nun at Faremoutiers-en-Brie in France, where she became abbess after St Fara.

Felix of Nantes July 7
+ 584. A great Bishop of Nantes in France for some thirty-three years.

Hedda July 7
+ 705. A monk and abbot in England who in 676 became Bishop of Wessex. He lived in Dorchester-on-Thames and then in Winchester where his relics are preserved. He was a great benefactor of the monastery of Malmesbury. He was bishop for about forty years and was greatly esteemed for his wisdom.

Iflidius (Allyre) July 7
+ 385. Fourth Bishop of Clermont in France. St Gregory of Tours revered him greatly

Maolruain July 7
+ 792. Founder of the monastery of Tallaght in Ireland and compiler of the martyrology of that name.

Medran and Odran July 7
6th cent. Two brothers, disciples of St Kieran of Saghir in Ireland, one of whom remained with St Kieran, while the other founded a monastery in Muskerry.

Palladius July 7
5th cent. A deacon from Rome or Auxerre in France who was sent in c 430 to preach the Gospel in Ireland. He landed near Wicklow and after some success left for Scotland, where he reposed.

Pantaenus July 7
+ c 190. Born in Sicily, Pantaenus became the head of the Orthodox School in Alexandria.

Prosper of Aquitaine July 7
c 390-436. Born in Aquitaine in France, he was a married layman who devoted himself to theology.

Willibald July 7
c 700-786/7. Born in Wessex in England, he was a brother of Sts Winebald and Walburgh and a cousin of St Boniface. At the age of five he was given as a monk at Waltham in Hampshire. In 722 he accompanied his father St Richard and his brother St Winebald on a pilgrimage to Rome and the Holy Land. Here he visited all the holy places and many monasteries, staying in Constantinople for two years. On his return to Italy he lived at Montecassino for ten years. Then he was sent to Germany to help St Boniface and in 742 was consecrated Bishop of Eichstätt. With his brother St Winebald he founded the monastery of Heidenheim where their sister Walburgh became abbess. His relics are still in the Cathedral in Eichstätt.

July 8

Sunniva (Sunnifa) July 8
10th cent. By tradition, Sunniva was a princess who fled from Ireland with her brother and others. They were shipwrecked off the coast of Norway but landed on Selje Island. Here they were slain by people from the mainland and their relics were enshrined in Bergen – Rejoicings to Saint Sunniva: Click HERE

Philomena, July 8 & Aug 11

+ 302. St Philomena was a princess from Corfu Island, Greece. She martyred in Rome.

Adrian III July 8
+ 885. The last Orthodox Pope of Rome.

Apollonius July 8
+ c 326. Bishop of Benevento in Italy. He went into hiding during the last persecution under Diocletian.

Aquila and Priscilla July 8
1st cent. Husband and wife, belonging to the Jewish diaspora, who worked as tentmakers at Rome and were exiled from there with all the other Jews under Claudius. They settled in Corinth, where they received the Apostle Paul into their house (Acts 18,3). Under Nero they returned to Rome and Paul sent greetings to them. A tradition in Rome says that they were martyred there.

Arnold July 8
+ c. 800. Apparently of Greek descent, he was famed for his charity to the poor. He has left his name to the village, Arnold-Villiers (Arnoldsweiler) near Jülich, now in Germany.

Auspicius July 8
+ c 130. By tradition the fourth Bishop of Trier in Germany and successor of St Maternus (c 130).

Auspicius July 8
+ c 475. Bishop of Toul in France.

Edgar the Peaceful July 8
+ 975. A King of England who repented of a depraved youth and whose reign was marked by a strong religious revival in England.

Grimbald July 8
+ 901. A monk at Saint Bertin in the north of France. In 885 King Alfred invited him to England. He became Abbot of Winchester and he helped restore learning in England.

Kilian (Chilianus), Colman and Totnan July 8
+ c 689. Monks from Ireland who enlightened Franconia and East Thuringia, where they were martyred. Kilian was Bishop of Wurzburg in Germany where he is still honoured.

Landrada July 8
+ c 690. Foundress and first Abbess of Munsterbilsen in Belgium.

Morwenna July 8
5th cent? Several places are named after her, notably Morwenstow in Cornwall, where her relics are probably buried under the church floor and where she has appeared.

Sostratus, Spirus, Eraclius, Eperentius and Cecilia July 8
? 4th cent. Martyrs of Syrmium in Pannonia.

Sunniva (Sunnifa) July 8
10th cent. By tradition, Sunniva was a princess who fled from Ireland with her brother and others. They were shipwrecked off the coast of Norway but landed on Selje Island. Here they were slain by people from the mainland and their relics were enshrined in Bergen.

Withburgh (Withburga) July 8
+ c 743. Youngest daughter of King Anna of East Anglia in England. After her father had fallen in battle, she became a nun and lived as an anchoress at East Dereham in Norfolk, founding a convent there.

July 9

Agilulf July 9
+ c 720. A monk and Abbot of Stavelot-Malmédy in Belgium and Archbishop of Cologne in Germany. His martyrdom was the result of his zeal and was aided by the connivance of Charles Martel.

Agrippinus July 9
+ 538. Bishop of Autun in France, he ordained St Germanus of Paris to the deaconate and the priesthood.

Anatolia and Audax July 9
+ c 250. Martyrs in Rome under Decius. Confined to a prison near Rieti the small village now called Sant’ Anatolia. Anatolia’s miracles converted Audax, one of the guards.

Brictius July 9
+ c 312. Bishop of Martola near Spoleto in Umbria in Italy, imprisoned for Orthodoxy under Diocletian. He escaped death and died a confessor under Constantine.

Everildis (Averil) July 9
+ c 700. Born in England, she became a nun at a place called ‘the Bishop’s Farm’, later known as Everingham (in Yorkshire), where she became abbess of a convent of some eighty nuns.

Golvinus (Golwen) July 9
? 7th cent. Born in Britain, his holiness led to him becoming Bishop of St Pol-de-Léon in Brittany. He reposed in Rennes where his relics are enshrined.

Justus of Poland July 9
+ 1008. One of four hermit-brothers in Poland – Sts Benedict, Andrew, Barnabas and Justus.

July 10

Alexander July 10
+ c 150. An early martyr in Rome.

Amelberga July 10
+ 690. Born in Brabant in Belgium, she was married to Count Witger and was the mother of Sts Gudula, Emebert and Reineldis. When Witger became a monk at Lobbes, she joined the convent at Maubeuge.

Amelberga July 10
+ c 772. A nun at Münsterbilsen in Belgium. Her relics were later transferred to the monastery of St Peter in Ghent.

Etto (Hetto) July 10
+ c 670. Born in Ireland. He was Abbot of St Peter’s at Fescau in Belgium and also bishop.

Januarius, Marinus, Nabor and Felix July 10
? Martyrs in North Africa.

Lantfrid, Waltram and Elilantus July 10
+ c 770. Three brothers who founded the monastery of Benediktbeuren in Bavaria in Germany and succeeded one another as abbots.

Pascharius (Pasquier) July 10
+ c 680. Bishop of Nantes in France. He founded the monastery of Aindre.

Peter of Perugia July 10
+ 1007. Peter Vincioli was born near Perugia in Italy and founded the monastery of St Peter there.

Rufina and Secunda July 10
+ 257. Two virgin-martyrs in Rome under Valerian, buried at Santa Rufina on the Aurelian Way.

Rufinus and Secundus July 10
? Early martyrs buried on the Via Cornelia at the eleventh milestone from Rome.

Seven Brothers July 10 (In the East Jan 25)
+ c 150. Seven early martyrs in Rome who became brothers through sharing martyrdom. Their names are: Januarius, Felix and Philip, scourged to death; Sylvanus, thrown over a precipice; Alexander, Vitalis and Martial, beheaded. They suffered in Rome under Antoninus Pius.

July 11

Abundius July 11
+ 854. A parish priest in Ananelos, a village near Cordoba in Spain. He had no thought of martyrdom, but when he had to, he bravely confessed Christ before the tribunal of the Moorish Caliph of Cordoba. He was beheaded and his body was thrown to the dogs.

Amabilis July 11
+ c 634. Daughter of an English noble, she became a nun at Saint-Amand in Rouen in France.

Benedict July 11 (In the East March 14)
c 480-550. Born near Nursia in Umbria in central Italy, at the age of twenty he went to live as a hermit in a cave near Subiaco. Many disciples flocked to him and he built a laura, composed of twelve small monasteries for them. About the year 530 he left Subiaco for Montecassino, where he founded a monastery and where he lived the rest of his life as a deacon and famed as a wonderworker. He reposed while standing in prayer before the altar. Some relics of St Benedict were later translated to France but others remained at Montecassino.

Drostan July 11
+ c 610. Born in Ireland, he became a monk with St Columba and the first Abbot of Deer in Aberdeenshire. He is venerated as one of the Apostles of Scotland. His holy well is near Aberdour.

Hidulf (Hidulphus) July 11
+ 707. Born in Regensburg in Germany, he became a monk at the monastery of Maximinus in Trier. Later he was consecrated bishop, but about the year 676 he founded the monastery of Moyenmoutier in the east of France and lived there. When he reposed he was Abbot both of Moyenmoutier and Bonmoutier (Galilaea, afterwards called Saint-Dié).

John of Bergamo July 11
+ c 690. Bishop of Bergamo in Italy (c 656 to c 690), he was renowned for his learning and great success in fighting Arianism.

Leontius the Younger July 11
c 510-565. A soldier who served against the Visigoths. He married and went to live in Bordeaux in France where he became bishop.

Pius I July 11
+ c 155. Pope from c 142 to c 155. He may have been a brother of Hermas, the writer of the work called The Shepherd. If so, Pius, like his brother, was born a slave. He opposed the Gnostics, notably the Gnostic Marcion. He may have been martyred.

Sabinus (Savinus) and Cyprian July 11
? Two martyrs and brothers venerated in Brescia in Italy.

Sabinus July 11
+ 5th cent. A saint venerated near Poitiers in France, said to have been a disciple of St Germanus of Auxerre. Local tradition considers him to have been a martyr.

Sidronius July 11
+ c 270. A martyr in Rome under Aurelian.

Sigisbert and Placid July 11
+ c 650 (or c 750?). Sigisbert founded the monastery of Dissentis in Switzerland. He built it on land given to him by St Placid, a wealthy landowner who joined the monastery as a monk and was later martyred for defending it.

Thurketyl (Turketil) July 11
887-975. Of Danish origin, he restored the monastery of Crowland in England, which had been destroyed by the pagan Danes. He was also abbot of the monastery at Bedford.

July 12

Ansbald July 12
+ 886. Born in Luxembourg, he became a monk at Prüm in Germany, then Abbot of Saint-Hubert in the Ardennes, and finally of Prüm in 860. His monastery was burnt down by the Vikings in 882 but he succeeded in restoring it.

Hermagoras and Fortunatus July 12
+ c 66. According to tradition, St Hermagoras was a disciple of the Apostle Mark and was consecrated first Bishop of Aquileia in Italy. After a fruitful apostolate he and his deacon Fortunatus were beheaded under Nero.

Marciana July 12
+ c 303. A virgin-martyr venerated in Toledo in Spain.

Menulphus (Menou) July 12
7th cent. Born in Ireland, he became Bishop of Quimper in Brittany.

Nabor and Felix July 12
+ c 304. Martyrs in Milan in Italy under Diocletian. Their relics were enshrined by St Ambrose nearly a century after their martyrdom.

Paternian July 12
+ c 470. Bishop of Bologna in Italy c 450-470.

Paulinus of Antioch and Companions July 12
c 67. Venerated as the first bishop and patron-saint of Lucca in Tuscany in Italy. By tradition he was born in Antioch and sent to Lucca by the Apostle Peter where he was martyred with others.

Proculus July 12
+ 542 Bishop of Bologna in Italy (540-542), martyred by the Goths.

Viventiolus July 12
+ 524. A monk at St Oyend in France who became Archbishop of Lyons. He was close to St Avitus of Vienne.

July 13

Dogfan (Doewan) July 13
5th cent. Martyred by heathen in Dyfed in Wales where a church was dedicated to him.

Eugene, Salutaris, Muritta and Companions July 13
+ 505. Eugene became Bishop of Carthage in North Africa in 481 but was soon afterwards expelled by the Arian Vandals with many of his flock, some of them mere boys. They were exiled to the desert of Tripoli, where they suffered greatly. In 488 they were allowed to return to Carthage, but Eugene was exiled again eight years later and reposed at Albi in Italy. All the above are considered to be martyrs because of their sufferings.

Julian of Le Mans Jan 27 (In the East July 13)
? 3rd cent. Venerated as the first Bishop of Le Mans in France.

Mildred of Thanet July 13
+ c 700 One of the three daughters of St Ermenburgh of Minster-in-Thanet in England. She succeeded her mother as Abbess of Thanet. Her relics were enshrined in Canterbury and part of them survive. Her life describes her as ‘ever merciful, of easy temper and tranquil’.

Turiaf (Turiav, Turiavus) July 13
+ c 750. He succeeded St Samson as Bishop of Dol in Brittany.

July 14

Felix of Como July 14
+ c 390. The first Bishop of Como in Italy. He was a friend of St Ambrose.

Idus July 14
5th cent. Baptised by St Patrick, he became Bishop of Alt-Fadha in Leinster in Ireland.

Justus July 14
? A soldier martyred in Rome

Libert July 14
+ 783. Born in Malines in Belgium, he was baptised and became a monk with St Rumoldus. Later he moved to the monastery of Saint-Trond where he was martyred by barbarians.

Marcellinus (Marchelm, Marculf) July 14
+ c 762. Born in England, he followed St Willibrord to Holland. Together with St Liafwine he preached the Gospel to the people of Over-Yssel. He reposed at Oldenzeel, but his relics were later taken to Deventer.

Optatian July 14
+ c 505. Bishop of Brescia in Italy c 451-505.

July 15

Adalard July 15
+ c 824. Called the younger, he was a monk at Corbie in France.

Apronia (Evronie) July 15
5th and 6th cent. Born near Trier in Germany, she was the sister of St Aprus (Evre), Bishop of Toul, who made her a nun. She reposed in Troyes in France.

Athanasius July 15
+ 872. Bishop of Naples in Italy, after he had ruled it for twenty years he began to suffer from the exactions of relatives, in whose hands rested the civil authority of Naples. Imprisoned, and then exiled, he reposed in Veroli and was buried at Montecassino, from where his body was transferred to Naples.

Benedict July 15
+ c 820. Bishop of Angers in the west of France.

Catulinus (Cartholinus), Januarius, Florentius, Julia and Justa July 15
? Martyrs in Carthage in North Africa.

Donald (Donivald) July 15
8th cent. A holy man who with his nine daughters, ‘the Nine Maidens’, lived as a hermit in Ogilvy in Scotland.

Edith of Polesworth July 15
+ c 925. Abbess of Polesworth in England and a sister of a King of England.

Eternus July 15
+ c 660. The ninth Bishop of Evreux in France.

Eutropius, Zosima and Bonosa July 15
+ c 273. Martyrs in Porto near Rome under Aurelian.

Felix of Pavia July 15
? A martyr in Pavia in Italy.

Haruch July 15
+ c 830. Bishop near Werden in Germany

Secundinus, Agrippinus, Maximus, Fortunatus and Martialis July 15
? 4th cent. Martyrs in Pannonia.

July 16

Domnio July 16
+ c 295. A martyr in Bergamo in Italy under Diocletian.

Generosus July 16
+ c 682. Abbot of Saint-Jouin-de-Marnes in Poitou in France.

Helier July 16
6th cent. Born in Tongres in Belgium, he lived as a hermit on Jersey in the Channel Islands and was martyred by heathen whom he was trying to convert.

Irmengard July 16
+ 866. Abbess of Buchau and then of Chiemsee in Germany.

Julia May 22 (In the East July 16)
+ 440. Born in Carthage in North Africa, she was sold into slavery by the Vandal conquerors. The ship on which she was being taken to Gaul stopped in Corsica. At that time heathen festival was being celebrated and when Julia refused to join in, she was immediately martyred by being nailed to a cross. She is the patron-saint of Corsica.

Reineldis (Raineldis, Reinaldes) and Companions July 16
+ c 680. Daughter of St Amelberg and sister of St Gudula. She was a nun at Saintes in Belgium where she was martyred together with two companions by the Huns.

Sisenandus July 16
+ 851. Born in Badajoz in Estremadura, he became a deacon in the church of St Acisclus in Cordoba in Spain. He was beheaded under Abderrahman II.

Tenenan July 16
7th cent. Probably born in Wales, he became a hermit in Brittany and eventually Bishop of Léon. His relics were enshrined in Ploabennec.

Valentine July 16
+ c 305. Bishop of Trier in Germany, or more probably Tongres in Belgium, martyred under Diocletian.

Vitalian July 16
+ 776. Bishop of Osimo in Italy.

Vitalian July 16
? Bishop of Capua in the south of Italy.

July 17

Alexis July 17 (In the East March 17)
+ early 5th cent. A saint originally distinguished by the title of ‘the man of God’. The son of a Roman senator, in order to serve God in humility, he fled from his parental home disguised as a beggar. He set sail for Edessa where after seventeen years an Icon of the Mother of God proclaimed him ‘the man of God’. He fled again and eventually returned to Rome and for years lived unrecognised as a beggar in his own home. After his repose a mysterious voice again proclaimed him ‘the man of God’.

Andrew Zorard July 17
+ c 1010. Born in Poland, he lived as a hermit on Mount Zobar in Hungary.

Cynllo July 17
5th cent. Several churches are dedicated to him in Wales.

Ennodius July 17
473-521. Magnus Felix Ennodius was a Gallo-Roman who became Bishop of Pavia in Italy. He was entrusted with two missions to Constantinople in connection with the Eutychian controversy. An Orthodox poet, his hymns are very edifying.

Fredegand (Fregaut) July 17
+ c 740. Born in Ireland, he was a disciple of St Foillan. He became a monk and Abbot of Kerkelodor near Antwerp in Belgium.

Generosus July 17
? Venerated in Tivoli in Italy, where his relics are enshrined in the Cathedral.

Kenelm July 17
+ 821. Son of King Coenwulf of Mercia in England. By tradition he was murdered in the forest of Clent and buried in Winchcombe.

Leo IV July 17
+ 855. Born in Rome, he was a monk of the monastery of San Martino and was chosen Pope of Rome in 847. He enclosed the whole Vatican city with a wall (the Leonine city) and through his prayers, the Saracens were utterly routed at Ostia.

Marcellina July 17
c 330-398. Born in Rome, she was the elder sister of St Ambrose of Milan and St Satyrus. She became a nun in 353. Her remains are enshrined in Milan.

Scillitan Martyrs July 17
+ 180. Twelve martyrs, seven men and five women, who suffered at Scillium in North Africa under Septimius Severus. Their names are: Speratus, Narzales, Cythinus, Veturius, Felix, Acyllinus, Laetantius, Januaria, Generosa, Vestina, Donata and Secunda. The official Acts of these martyrs still exist.

Theodosius July 17
+ 516. Bishop of Auxerre in France c 507-516.

Turninus July 17
8th cent. An priest from Ireland who worked with St Foillan in Holland and also near Antwerp in Belgium.

July 18

Arnulf July 18
+ c 640. A courtier of high standing in the palace of the Austrasian kings, he decided to become a monk at Lérins. His wife became a nun and Arnulf was on the point of going to Lérins when he was made Bishop of Metz (c 616). A few years before his death he finally managed to go and live as a hermit.

Edburgh (Edburga) of Bicester July 18
c 650. A daughter of the pagan King Penda, she became a nun. Her relics were later transferred from Adderbury (Edburgh’s burgh) in Oxfordshire in England to Bicester.

Frederick July 18
+ 838. Bishop of Utrecht in Holland from 820 on, he was murdered while in church in Maastricht.

Goneri July 18
6th cent. An exile from Britain to Brittany, where he lived as a hermit near Tréguier.

Gundenis July 18
+ 203. A virgin-martyred in Carthage in North Africa under Septimius Severus.

Marina July 18
? A martyr in Orense in Spain.

Maternus July 18
+ c 307. Bishop of Milan in Italy, chosen by popular acclamation in 295. He suffered a great deal during the persecution of Diocletian, but survived and reposed in peace.

Minnborinus July 18
+ 986. Born in Ireland, he became Abbot of St Martin’s in Cologne in Germany (974-986).

Philastrius July 18
+ c 387. Born in Spain, he became Bishop of Brescia in Italy at the time of the Arian troubles. He wrote a book against the Arians which still exists. His successor, St Gaudentius, praised him for his ‘modesty, quietness and gentleness towards all men’ and for his love for the poor.

Rufillus (Ruffilius) July 18
+ 382. First Bishop of Forlimpopoli in Emilia in Italy.

Symphorosa and Companions July 18
A martyr in Tivoli under Hadrian and widow of the martyr St Getulius. She is commemorated together with other martyrs: Crescens, Julian, Nemesius, Primitivus, Justin, Stracteus and Eugene.

Theneva (Thenew) Thenova, Dwynwen July 18
7th cent. The mother of St Kentigern and patron-saint of Glasgow in Scotland together with him.

July 19

Ambrose Autpertus July 19
+ c 778. Born in France, he went to Italy as an envoy and visited the monastery of St Vincent near Benevento, where he became a monk. Eventually he became abbot.

Arsenius the Great July 19
+ c 449. Surnamed also ‘the Roman’ and ‘the deacon’, being actually a Roman deacon. He was called by Theodosius the Great to Constantinople to become the tutor of Arcadius and Honorius, the Emperor’s sons (c 383). After ten years in that office (c 393) he abandoned the court and retired to the desert of Skete as a hermit. He remained a hermit for the rest of his life, living in various places in Egypt, always weeping over the feebleness of Arcadius and the foolishness of Honorius. He reposed at the rock of Tröe near Memphis.

Aurea (Aura) July 19
+ 856. Born in Cordoba in Spain and a daughter of Muslim parents, in her widowhood she became a Christian and a nun at Cuteclara, where she remained for more than twenty years. She was then denounced as a Christian by her own family and beheaded.

Felix (Felicinus) of Verona July 19
? Bishop of Verona in Italy, venerated from ancient times as a saint.

Jerome of Pavia July 19
+ 787. Bishop of Pavia in Italy 778-787.

Justa and Rufina July 19
+ 287. Two sisters in Seville in Spain, potters by trade, who suffered under Diocletian. They are venerated as the main patron-saints of Seville.

Martin of Trier July 19
+ c 210. Tenth Bishop of Trier in Germany and possibly a martyr.

Symmachus July 19
+ 514. Born in Sardinia, he became Pope of Rome in 498. Energetic and competent, despite the activities and accusations of enemies, he built many churches in Rome.

July 20

Ansegisus July 20
c 770-833. A monk at Fontenelle in France at the age of eighteen, he later restored several monasteries.

Aurelius July 20
+ 429. Bishop of Carthage in North Africa.

Elswith July 20
+ 903. Wife of King Alfred the Great, after his death she became a nun at the convent which she had founded in Winchester.

Paul of St Zoilus July 20
+ 851. A deacon in Cordoba in Spain who belonged to the monastery of St Zoilus and who was very zealous in ministering to Christians imprisoned by the Muslims. He was beheaded for the Orthodox Faith and his relics were enshrined in the church of St Zoilus.

Rheticus (Rheticius, Rhetice) July 20
+ 334. A Gallo-Roman who became Bishop of Autun in France c 310.

Severa July 20
+ c 680. Sister of St Modoald, Bishop of Trier in Germany. First Abbess of St Gemma (later Sainte-Sevère) in Villeneuve near Bourges in France.

Severa July 20
+ c 750. Abbess of the convent of Oehren in Trier in Germany.

Wulmar (Ulmar, Ulmer, Vilmarus, Volmar) July 20
+ 689. Born near Boulogne in the north of France, he became a monk and later founded the monastery of Samer near Boulogne, later called Saint-Vulmaire after him. He also founded a convent at Wierre-aux-Bois.

July 21

Arbogast July 21
+ c 678. Born in Aquitaine in France, he was a hermit in Alsace when King Dagobert II forced him to become Bishop of Strasbourg, where he showed great humility and wisdom. At his own request he was buried in the place set apart for the burial of criminals. A church was soon built over his tomb.

Claudius, Justus, Jucundinus and Companions July 21
+ 273. A group of eight martyrs who suffered with St Julia in Troyes in France under Aurelian. Their relics were enshrined in the convent of Jouarre near Meaux.

Constantine July 21
+ c 560. A disciple and the first successor of St Benedict at Montecassino in Italy.

John and Benignus July 21
+ 707. Twin brothers and monks at Moyenmoutier in France.

Julia of Troyes July 21
+ c 272. Born in Troyes in France, she was seized by soldiers of the Emperor Aurelian after his victory over the usurper Tetricus. Committed to the charge of an officer called Claudius, she converted him to Christ and both were beheaded in Troyes under the same Aurelian.

Praxedes July 21
2nd cent. The daughter of the Roman senator Pudens and sister of St Pudentiana. One of the ancient churches in Rome is dedicated to her.

Victor Alexander, Felician and Longinus July 21
+ c 290. Victor, an army officer in Marseilles in France, suffered martyrdom there with three prison-guards whom he had converted. In the fourth century St John Cassian built a monastery over their tomb which afterwards became the monastery of St Victor.

Wastrada July 21
+ c 760. Mother of St Gregory of Utrecht in Holland, she became a nun at the end of her life.

July 22

Dabius (Davius) July 22
? A priest from Ireland who preached in Scotland, where churches are dedicated to him.

Meneleus (Menele, Mauvier) July 22
+ c 720. Born in Anjou, he became a monk at Carméry in Auvergne in France. After seven years he left to restore the monastery of Ménat near Clermont.

Movean (Biteus) July 22
? A disciple of St Patrick and Abbot of Inis-Coosery in Co. Down in Ireland. He also lived in Perthshire in Scotland where he reposed as a hermit.

Pancharius July 22
+ c 356. Bishop of Besançon in France. He suffered much under the Arian Emperor Constantius.

Wandrille (Wandregisilus, Vandrille) July 22
c 600-668. Born near Verdun, he served in the king’s palace and married. After a pilgrimage to Rome his wife became a nun and he became a monk at Roumain-Moutier. Some ten years later he founded the monastery of Fontenelle in the north of France which came to have over three hundred monks.

July 23

Apollinaris July 23
1st cent. The first Bishop of Ravenna in Italy, he was tortured for the Orthodox Faith and died. The exact date is not known. His shrine is at the monastery of Classe in Ravenna.

Apollonius and Eugene July 23
? Early Roman martyrs, the former was pierced with arrows at the stake, the latter was beheaded.

John Cassian July 23
c 360-433. Probably born in what is now Romania, he became a monk in Egypt and afterwards went to Marseilles in France, where he founded the monastery of St Victor and a convent, ruling both from Lérins. His Conferences and his Institutes are still read throughout the Orthodox world. He was an ardent advocate of the Orthodox teaching on free will and opposed what later became known as Augustianism.

Liborious July 23
+ 390. Bishop of Le Mans in France from 348 to 390. He is the patron saint of Paderborn in Germany where his relics were moved in 836.

Rasyphus and Ravennus July 23
5th cent. Born in Britain, they took refuge in the north of France. They became hermits there and were martyred in Macé. Their relics are enshrined in Bayeux.

Rasyphus July 23
? A martyr venerated in Rome from early times.

Romula, Redempta and Herundo July 23
+ c 580. Three holy virgins who lived as ascetics near the church of St Mary Major in Rome.

Trophimus and Theophilus July 23
+ c 302. Martyrs beheaded in Rome under Diocletian.

Valerian July 23
+ c 460. A monk at Lérins in the south of France who became Bishop of Cimeiz. He attended the Councils of Riez (439) and Vaison (442). Some of his homilies still exist.

Vitalian Jan 27 (In the East July 23)
+ 672. Pope of Rome from 657 to 672. He was much troubled by Monothelitism. He consecrated Theodore of Tarsus as Archbishop of Canterbury in 668.

July 24

Aliprandus (Leuprandus) July 24
8th cent. Abbot of St Augustine’s in Pavia in Italy.

Christiana July 24
7th cent. By tradition she was born in England, but lived a holy life in Flanders. She is the patron saint of Termonde in Belgium.

Christina July 24
? Probably born in Rome, she was a virgin martyred near Lake Bolsena in Tuscany.

Declan July 24
5th cent. A disciple of St Colman who became bishop in the area of Ardmore in Ireland.

Dictinus July 24
+ 420. An adherent of Priscillianism, he was converted by St Ambrose and renounced his errors at the Council of Toledo (400). Soon afterwards he became Bishop of Astorga in Spain.

Godo (Gaon) July 24
+ c 690. Born in Verdun in France, he was a nephew of St Wandrille. He became a monk at Fontenelle and later founded the monastery of Oye near Sezanne-en-Brie.

Lewina July 24
5th cent. A Briton and virgin-martyr venerated in Seaford in Sussex in England.

Menefrida July 24
5th cent. Patron-saint of Tredresick in Cornwall.

Sigolena (Segoulème) July 24
+ c 769. Daughter of a noble in Aquitaine, once widowed she became a nun in the convent of Troclar on the Tarn in the south of France, where she later became abbess.

Ursicinus July 24
+ c 380. Fourth Bishop of Sens in France and an opponent of Arianism.

Victor, Stercatius and Antinogenes July 24
+ 304. By tradition three brothers martyred in Merida in Estremadura in Spain.

Vincent July 24
? A martyr in Rome outside the walls of the city on the road to Tivoli.

Wulfhad and Rufinus (Ruffin) July 24
7th century. Two princes of the royal family of Mercia in England, baptised by St Chad and then put to death by their father, unconverted, at Stone in Staffordshire.

July 25

Cucuphas (Cucufate, Cugat, Guinefort, Qoqofas) July 25
+ 304. Born in North Africa, he went to Spain and was martyred near Barcelona where the monastery of St Cugat del Valles was later founded. He is one of the most famous Spanish martyrs.

Ebrulfus (Evroult) July 25
+ c 600. Born in Beauvais in France, he became a hermit and later founded a monastery at Saint-Fuscien-aux-Bois.

Florentius and Felix July 25
+ 235. Two soldiers martyred under Maximinius the Thracian at Furcona near Aquila in the south of Italy. They belong to a group of eighty-three soldiers commemorated on July 24.

Glodesind July 25
+ c 608. She was betrothed to a courtier who was arrested on their wedding day and afterwards executed. She became a nun in Metz in France, where she later became abbess.

James the Greater July 25 (October 9 in the East)
+ 44. The son of Zebedee and brother of St John the Evangelist, he was one of the Twelve and the first to be martyred (Acts 12, 2) under King Herod Agrippa. By tradition he travelled as far as Spain and certainly relics of the Apostle were later enshrined in Compostella. Owing to this apostolic link, it became the most important places of pilgrimage in the West after Rome. St James is the patron-saint of Spain.

Magnericus July 25
+ 596. Bishop of Trier in Germany (c 566). He was a close friend of St Gregory of Tours and one of the most illustrious bishops of his time.

Nissen July 25
5th cent. A convert of St Patrick of Ireland, he became Abbot of Montgarth (Mountgarret) in Wexford.

Theodemir July 25
+ 851. A monk martyred in Cordoba in Spain under Abderrahman II.

July 26

Pastor July 26
+ c 160. A priest in Rome and by tradition the brother of Pope Pius I.

Simeon of Padolirone July 26
+ 1016. An Armenian hermit, he went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem, Rome, Compostella and Tours. He was renowned for the miracles he worked on these journeys. Finally he settled at the monastery of Padolirone near Padua in Italy.

Symphronius, Olympius, Theodulus and Exuperia July 26
+ 257. Symphronius was a Roman slave who brought about the conversion of the tribune Olympius, the latter’s wife Exuperia and their son Theodulus. They were all burnt to death under Valerian.

Valens July 26
+ 531. Bishop of Verona in Italy from 524 to 531.

July 27

Ecclesius July 27
+ 532. Bishop of Ravenna in Italy from 52l till 532. He began building San Vitale, where there is still a mosaic of him.

Etherius July 27
+ 573. Bishop of Auxerre in France.

George, Aurelius and Natalia, Felix and Liliosa July 27
+ c 852. Martyrs in Cordoba in Spain under the Caliph Abderrahman II. Aurelius and Felix, with their wives, Natalia and Liliosa, were Spaniards; but the deacon George was a monk from Palestine, who, though offered pardon as a foreigner, chose martyrdom for Christ with the others.

Maurus, Pantaleimon and Sergius July 27
+ c 117? Three martyrs venerated in Bisceglia on the Adriatic in Italy. Maurus is said to have been born in Bethlehem, sent by the Apostle Peter to be the first Bishop of Bisceglia. They were martyred under Trajan,

July 28

Arduinus (Ardwyne) July 28
7th cent. He is the patron-saint of Trepino in the south of Italy. According to some he was one of four English pilgrims who reposed in this region in the seventh century.

Camelian July 28
+ c 525. Successor of St Lupus as Bishop of Troyes in France from 478 to c 525.

Innocent I July 28
+ 417. Born in Albano near Rome, St Innocent was Pope from 402 till 417. The outstanding event of his life was the sack of Rome by the Goths under Alaric in 410. He also led the condemnation of Pelagianism.

Lucidus July 28
+ ? 938. A monk of St Peter’s near Aquara in the south of Italy.

Lyutius July 28
+ c 1038. A monk at Montecassino who died as a hermit at La Cava in Italy.

Nazarius and Celsus July 28
+ c ? 68. Martyrs in Milan in Italy under Nero.

Peregrinus July 28
2nd cent. (?) A priest near Lyons in France at the time of St Irenaeus and during the persecution under Severus. He lived as a hermit on an island in the River Saône.

Samson (Sampson) July 28
c 490-c 565. Born in Wales, he became a disciple of St Illtyd at Llantwit Major and then for a time was monk and abbot of the monastery on Caldey Island. He left Caldey and visited Ireland. Then he went to Cornwall and was consecrated bishop by St Dubricius. Finally he crossed to Brittany and spent the rest of his life enlightening that country, basing himself at Dol. He was one of the greatest missionaries of his century.

Victor I July 28
+ 198. Born in North Africa, he was Pope of Rome for ten years (189-198).

July 29

Faustinus July 29
4th cent. A disciple of St Felix, Bishop of Martano near Spoleto in Italy, he was present at his martyrdom. St Faustinus suffered for Christ before reposing peacefully in Todi in Umbria.

Kilian July 29
7th cent. An abbot of a monastery on the island of Inishcaltra in Ireland and author of a Life of St Brigid.

Lupus of Troyes July 29
384-478. Born in Toul in France, he married the sister of St Hilary. After seven years, husband and wife separated by mutual consent, Lupus becoming a monk at Lérins. In 426 he became Bishop of Troyes. He accompanied St Germanus of Auxerre to Britain to oppose Pelagianism. In 453 he succeeded in saving Troyes from Attila. He reposed at the age of ninety-four.

Olav of Norway (Olaf, Tola) July 29
995-1030. Son of King Harald of Norway. His early youth was spent as a pirate but in 1010 he was baptised in Rouen in France and in 1013 he helped Ethelred of England against the Danes. In 1015 he succeeded to the throne of Norway and at once called missionaries, mainly from England, to enlighten his homeland. He succeeded in part but was driven from his kingdom. In an attempt to recover it, he fell in battle at Stiklestad. In Norway he is regarded as the champion of national independence.

Prosper of Orleans July 29
+ c 453. Bishop of Orleans in France.

Serapia July 29
+ 119. A slave of Syrian descent who was beheaded in Rome under Hadrian.

Silin (Sulian) July 29
6th cent. Born in Brittany, he founded a small monastery in Luxulyan in Cornwall.

Simplicius, Faustinus and Beatrix July 29
+ c 303. By tradition, two brothers and their sister martyred in Rome under Diocletian.

July 30

Abdon and Sennen July 30
3rd or 4th cent. Persian nobles brought to Rome as prisoners, they devoted themselves to looking after imprisoned Christians and burying the relics of the martyrs.

Ermengyth July 30
+ c 680. A sister of St Ermenburgh. She lived as a nun at Minster-in-Thanet in England.

Maxima, Donatilla and Secunda July 30
+ 304. Three holy virgins (Secunda was aged twelve), martyred in Tebourba in North Africa under Diocletian.

Olav of Sweden July 30
+ c 950. King of Sweden, martyred by the heathen for refusing to sacrifice to idols at the spot where Stockholm now stands.

Peter Chrysologus July 30
c 406-c 450. Born in Imola in Italy, he became deacon there, and then archdeacon and Archbishop of Ravenna (c 433). He is famed for his eloquence in preaching, thus the name Chrysologus, ‘Golden Speech’. Many of his sermons still exist.

Rufinus July 30
? A martyr in one of the early persecutions in Assisi in Italy.

Tatwine July 30
+ 734. A monk at Breedon in Mercia in England who was famed for his piety and learning. He succeeded St Brithwald, becoming the tenth Archbishop of Canterbury

Ursus July 30
+ 508. A hermit at the church of St Amator in Auxerre in France, he was made bishop of that city when he was aged seventy-five.

July 31

Calimerius July 31
+ c 190. A Greek who became Bishop of Milan in Italy. He is the Apostle of the Po Valley. He was martyred under Commodus by being thrown into a well. He is buried under the altar of his church in Milan.

Fabius July 31
+ 300. A soldier beheaded in Caesarea in Mauretania in North Africa under Diocletian for refusing to carry a standard bearing idolatrous emblems.

Firmus of Tagaste July 31
? Bishop of Tagaste in North Africa, he was tortured and endured terrible sufferings rather than betray the hiding-place of one of his flock.

Germanus of Auxerre July 31
c 378-448. Born in Auxerre in France, he governed part of Gaul. In 418 he became Bishop of Auxerre. He came to Britain twice (in 429 and 447), where he succeeded in stamping out Pelagianism. He reposed in Ravenna in Italy.

Neot July 31
c 880. According to tradition he was a monk at Glastonbury in England, who became a hermit in Cornwall at the place now called Saint Neot. Some relics were later taken to the town now called St Neots in Cambridgeshire.