The 9 Saints nonuplet sisters Virgin-Martyrs of Portugal: Saints Wilgefortis (Liberata) the crusified, Marina, Quiteria, Genibera, Eufemia, Marciana, Germana, Basilia & Victoria the Virgin-Martyrs in Mediterranean (+139) & Saint Ovidius 3rd Bishop of Braga, Portugal (+135)

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The 9 Saints nonuplet sisters Virgin-Martyrs of Portugal:

Saints Wilgefortis (Liberata) the crusified, Marina, Quiteria, Genibera, Eufemia, Marciana, Germana, Basilia & Victoria the Virgin-Martyrs in Mediterranean (+139)

& Saint Ovidius 3rd Bishop of Braga, Portugal (+135)

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

Saint Virgin-Martyr Wilgefortis or Liberata the crusified

in some icons show her with a beard in a memory of Virgin Mary’s miracle

to avoid to marry the pagan king

The names of the 9 Virgin-Martyrs from Portugal:

Saint Wilgefortis or Liberata or Eutropia the crucified, Virgin-Martyr in Aguas Santas, Spain (July 20, +139)

Saint Marina or Margarida, Virgin-Martyr in Aguas Santas, Spain  (January 18, +139)

Saint Quiteria, Virgin-Martyr in Aire-sur-l’Adour, France (May 22, +139)

Saint Eufemia or Eumelia, Virgin-Martyr in Braga, Portugal (September 16, +139)

Saint Marciana or Marica, Virgin-Martyr in Toledo, Spain (January 9, +139)

Saint Germana Virgin-Martyr and the Saints Paul, Gerontius, January, Saturninus, Suxessus, Julius, Katus and Pia, Martyrs in Numidia, North Africa (January 19, +139)

Saint Victoria / Vitoria / Rita, Virgin-Martyr from Braga, Portugal (November 17, +139)

Saint Genibera / Genebra / Gemma, Virgin-Martyr from Braga, Portugal (+139)

Saint Basilia or Basilissa, Virgin-Martyr from Braga, Portugal (July 12, +139)

Feast days: Jan 9, 18 & 19, May 22, June 3, July 12 & 20, Sep 16

 

 

 

The Saints 9 Virgin-Martyrs of Portugal were born in the year 119 A.D. in Braga, Portugal. They were the daughters of pagan Castelius Lucius Severus and Calsia.

Her mother, Calsia was disgusted at the fact that she went through nine childbirths and not one of them was male. She called on her maid Sila to dispose of them by drowning the nine infants. Sila was a follower of Christianity so she ended up giving the babies to a Christian monk to be raised in the Christian community. Their father King Lucio was completely unaware of their birth.

Saint Ovidius the Bishop of Braga in Portugal, took care of the girls, baptized them Christian, and taught them all about Christianity. St Quiteria was the most dedicated out of her sisters when it came to their faith. She was fascinated with the Virgin Mary and the words of Christ. The monk eventually told the girls that their biological parents were the Royal Rulers of the country, but none of them had the desire to live a luxurious life.

St Wilgefortis (Liberata), St Quiteria and their seven other sisters around breaking Christians out of jail. This lasted for a few years until they were caught and brought to the King. Once the King realized who they were he asked them to live in the palace. While the sisters lived there they praised Jesus everyday and eventually turned their room into a prayer hall. When the King realized they were Christians he told them to give it up and marry Roman pagans. They refused and were locked up in jail. In jail they praised and glorified Jesus, and eventually an angel came and told St Quiteria “Happy and fortunate you are, for you deserved to find grace in front of God, so that God has chosen you as his spouse. It is God’s will, that you are to live in solitude in the mount Oria and there you will exercise in oration and contemplation”. The angel released them from jail and they escaped all going in different directions. St Quiteria followed the angel and lived on the top of a mountain, where she was eventually captured. Once she again declined the marriage offer, she was imprisoned. Again she was freed by an angel, and returned to the mountain along with a group of other women whom she converted to Christianity. Along the way she had received the crown of martyrdom, and met Prosen Lastiano the ruler of the city Aufragia. She converted him to Christianity, but then a few days later he gave it up and became a pagan again. Prosen and his soldiers reached the mountain with intentions to kill her, but as the were ascending he fell down suddenly and lost all feeling in his hands and legs. Through the prayer of St Quiteria he regained his senses, and became full of faith. King Lucio was infuriated at the fact that his daughter converted women from his palace and one of his good friends to Christianity. Lucio and his soldiers left the palace so they could hunt her down. When they finally found her at the Aire-sur-l’Adour church in Gascony, France, he again tried to force her into marriage, and she declined because she wanted to remain a virgin for Jesus. Her father then ordered one of his soldiers to behead her, and it was done instantly. They also beheaded all of the other Christian women she was with. Αfter she was beheaded she walked to the Church of the Virgin Mary with her head in her hands.

 

Saint Marina was condemned to die in an oven. But she was rescued from this fate by St. Peter, who brought her out of the oven and water to cool her off. Later she was beheaded, but her head bounced around three times causing three fountains to spring from the ground.

In the place where she martyred there are:

-The prison of Saint Marina

-The church of Ascension: The oven of torture

-“Piocas”: The pond, where she was refreshed by St. Apostle Peter

-The sacred Fountains of Saint Marina: The places where her head bounced

-Saint Marina’s Oaks: Places with miraculous properties

-Vacariza carving stones

A parallel archaeological excavation and study of the local church has shown that the earliest layer of the present Church was built in the 6th century (AD 502 – 593).

 

Saint Wilgefortis, or Liberata, was martyred after Saint Marina in Aguas Santa in Spain. She was promised by her father to a pagan king. She took a vow of virginity and tried to stave off the wedding through prayer; she hoped to become repulsive and thus undesirable. Her prayers were answered in an odd way. She sprouted a beard.Her father, furious, had her crucified.

Saint Euphemia, or Eumelia, another sister, threw herself from a cliff to avoid capture. When she fell, the rock opened and swallowed her whole; a spring immediately appeared on the spot. This idea of being swallowed by rock and a subsequent spring echoes the Galician legends around St. Jacques and legends around Saint Fris, whose cult is centered in Gascony….where a lot of the 9-sisters action was said to have taken place.

Their sister Saint Marciana arrested in Toledo in Spain, where she was martyred.

Their sister Saint Victoria arrested in Cordoba in Spain, where she was martyred.

Their sister Saint Germana arrested and martyred in Numidia in North Africa, with the Saint Martyr Paul and 17 other Holy Martyrs.

Their sisters Saint Genibera and Saint Basilia arrested and martyred in Mediterranean Sea.

Saint Ovidius, also Saint Auditus, is a Portuguese saint. Saint Ovidius was a Roman citizen of Sicilian origin. Tradition states that he was sent to Braga by Pope Clement I, where he served as the city’s third bishop around 95. He baptized Saint Wilgifortis (Liberata) and her sisters after they were abandoned by their mother.

He was martyred for his Christian faith in 135.

The Portuguese call him Santo Ovídio, and sometimes, by the folkloric São Ouvido (literally “he who is heard” or “ear”), a folk-etymological translation of the Latin name Auditus; this name was then rendered as Ovídio. Because of his name, Saint Auditus or Ovidius was traditionally invoked against auditory diseases.

His feast day is June 3.

Sources:

Wikipedia

&

Abel-Tasos Gkiouzelis

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ORTHODOX HEART SITES

 

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St John Maximovitch: God saves His fallen creature by His own love for him, but man’s love for his Creator is also necessary

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ST JOHN MAXIMOVITCH OF SAN FRANCISCO

ORTHODOX HEART

St John Maximovitch:

God saves His fallen creature by His own love for him,

but man’s love for his Creator is also necessary

Now the Church consists of both her earthly and heavenly parts, for the Son of God came to earth and became man that He might lead man into heaven and make him once again a citizen of Paradise, returning to him his original state of sinlessness and wholeness and uniting him unto Himself.

This is accomplished by the action of Divine grace grated through the Church, but man’s effort is also required. God saves His fallen creature by His own love for him, but man’s love for his Creator is also necessary; without it he cannot by saved. Striving towards God and cleaving unto the Lord by its humble love, the human soul obtains power to cleanse itself from sin and to strengthen itself for the struggle to complete victory over sin.

+ St. John the Wonderworker of Shanghai and San Francisco, “The Church as the Body of Christ,” Man of God: Saint John of Shanghai & San Francisco

Source:

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com/2015/07/29/st-john-maximovitch-god-saves-his-fallen-creature-by-his-own-love-for-him-but-mans-love-for-his-creator-is-also-necessary/

ORTHODOX CHURCH QUOTES

בלדכילדיס הקדושה ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Eastern Orthodox Christian Church: The Life of Saint Bathildis in Hebrew language

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

FRANCE OF MY HEART

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(+680) St Bathlildis בלדכילדיס הקדושה

בינואר 30

(Saint Bathlildis) בלדכילדיס הקדושה

בלדכילדיס או בלדתילד (Baldechildis וגם Balthild‏, Bathilda‏, Baudour או Bauthieult;‏ נולדה ב-626 לערך – נפטרה ב-30 בינואר 680) הייתה אשתו של כלוביס השני מלך נויסטריה ובורגונדיה.

שתי המסורות מציגות אותה כבת העלית האנגלו סקסית, ייתכן שהייתה קרובת משפחה של ריקברט, מלך ממלכת מזרח אנגליה, המלך הפגאני האחרון שם. אחרי שריקברט הודח מכס השלטון על ידי סיגיברט נמכרה בלדכילדיס לעבדות. היא הגיעה, עדיין כנערה צעירה, למשק הבית של ארכינולד (Erkinoald), שהיה המיורדומוס בנויסטריה, תחת כלוביס השני.

על פי ה-Vita Sanctae Bathildis, בלדכילדיס הייתה נערה יפה, חכמה, צנועה וקשובה לצרכיהם של אחרים. ארכינולד, שאשתו נפטרה, נמשך לשפחה ורצה להנשא לה. בלדכילדיס שלא רצתה להינשא לו התחבאה עד שהוא נישא בשנית. בשלב זה הבחין בה המלך כלוביס עצמו וביקש את ידה בשנת 649. על פי המסופר הייתה בת 19 בהינשאה לכלוביס והוא עצמו היה, לפי הגרסאות השונות, בין גיל 12 ל-16.

לפי המקורות, גם כמלכה נשארה צנועה וחסודה והתפרסמה בזכות תרומותיה הנדיבות ומעשי הצדקה שלה. בין תרומותיה היו מנזר קורבי (וכן מענק קיום שנתי עבורו מתוך המסים שנאספו בעיר פוס) ומנזר של (Chelles). היא תמכה גם בקדוש קלאודיוס ובמנזר שלו.

נולדו לה שלושה בנים שהפכו למלכים: כילדריך, כלותאר ותאודריק.

לאחר שנפטר בעלה, ככל הנראה בין השנים 655 ל-658 (התאריך המדויק אינו ידוע) ירש אותו בנה בן ה-5, כלותאר השלישי והיא הפכה לעוצרת בשמו עד הגיעו לגיל בגרות בשנת 664. כמלכה הייתה מדינאית מיומנת, ביטלה את המנהג של מסחר בעבדים נוצרים ואף ביקשה את שחרורם של ילדים שנמכרו לעבדות. על פי הסיפור, כאשר שלושת בניה הגיעו לגיל מתאים וקיבלו כל אחד נחלה (כלותאר בנויסטריה, כילדריק באוסטרזיה ותיאודוריך כנראה בבורגונדי) ויתרה בלדכילדיס על סמכויות השלטון ועל תוארה והצטרפה (או אולצה להצטרף) למנזר. את שארית חייה הקדישה כדי לשרת את העניים וחולים.

בלדכילדיס נקברה במנזר אותו הקימה, מנזר של מחוץ לפריז. הגיוגרפיה עליה (Vita Baldechildis) נכתבה זמן קצר לאחר מותה, כנראה בקהילת של. בדומה להגוגיורפיות אחרות על קדושים מהשושלת המרובינגית, גם הגיוגרפיה זו מספקת מספר עובדות היסטוריות. פולחן קדושים שלה החל בשנת 833 כאשר שרידיה הועברו מהמנזר הישן לכנסייה חדשה שנבנתה. בלדכילדיס הוכרזה כקדושה כ-200 שנה אחרי מותה על ידי האפיפיור ניקולאס הראשון.

בחקר היסטורי, למרות שההגיוגרפיה שלה מדגישה את צניעותה כשפחה, בהקשר של תרבות המאה השביעית נראה כי בלדכילדיס הייתה פילגש שהעניק ארכינולד כמתנה לכלוביס.

Source:

Wikipedia

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בלדכילדיס הקדושה

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Saint Bathildis, Queen of France & Nun of Chelles in France, from England (+680) – January 30

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

FRANCE OF MY HEART

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Saint Bathildis,

Queen of France & Nun of Chelles in France, from England (+680)

January 30

Saint Balthild of Ascania (Old English: Bealdhild, ‘bold sword’ or ‘bold spear; around 626 – January 30, 680), also called Bathilda, Baudour, or Bauthieult, was the wife and queen of Clovis II, the king of Burgundy and Neustria (639–658).

Saint Balthild was sold into slavery as a young girl and served in the household of Erchinoald, the mayor of the palace of Neustria to Clovis.

Saint Balthild was born circa 626–627. She was beautiful, intelligent, modest and attentive to the needs of others. Erchinoald, whose wife had died, was attracted to Balthild and wanted to marry her, but she did not want to marry him. She hid herself away and waited until Erchinoald had remarried. Later, possibly because of Erchinoald, Clovis noticed her and asked for her hand in marriage.

Even as queen, Saint Balthild remained humble and modest. She is famous for her charitable service and generous donations. From her donations, the abbeys of Corbie and Chelles were founded: it is likely that others such as Jumièges, Jouarre and Luxeuil were also founded by the queen. She provided support for Saint Claudius of Besançon and his abbey in the Jura Mountains.

Saint Balthild bore Clovis three children, all of whom became kings: Clotaire, Childeric and Theuderic.

When Clovis died (between 655 and 658), his eldest son Clotaire succeeded to the throne, aged five. His mother St Balthild acted as the queen regent. As queen, she was a capable stateswoman. She abolished the practice of trading Christian slaves and strove to free children who had been sold into slavery. This claim is corroborated by Jane Tibbetts Schulenburg, who mentions that St Balthild and Saint Eloi (who was also known as Eligius, according to Dado) “worked together on their favorite charity, the buying and freeing of slaves”. After her three sons reached adulthood and had become established in their respective territories (Clotaire in Neustria, Childeric in Austrasia, and Theuderic in Burgundy), St Balthild withdrew to her favourite Abbey of Chelles near Paris.

Saint Balthild died on January 30, 680, and was buried at the Abbey of Chelles, east of Paris. Saint Balthild was canonised by Pope Nicholas I, around 200 years after her death.

Source:

Wikipedia

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St Bathildis

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Saints of France

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St Balthidis

Saint Gildas the Wise of Wales & France (+570) – January 29

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St Gildas

 

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Holy Wells of St Gildas, France

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Saint Gildas the Wise of Wales & France (+570)

Feast day: January 29

& Holy Relics, June 29

Saint Gildas (c. 500–570) — also known as Gildas the Wise or Gildas Sapiens — was a 6th-century British monk best known for his scathing religious polemic De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, which recounts the history of the Britons before and during the coming of the Saxons. He is one of the best-documented figures of the Christian church in the British Isles during the sub-Roman period, and was renowned for his Biblical knowledge and literary style. In his later life, he emigrated to Brittany where he founded a monastery known as St. Gildas de Rhuys.

Differing versions of the Life of Saint Gildas exist, but both agree that he was born in what is now Scotland on the banks of the River Clyde, and that he was the son of a royal family. These works were written in the eleventh and twelfth centuries and are regarded by scholars as unhistorical. He is now thought to have his origins further south. In his own work, he claims to have been born the same year as the Battle of Mount Badon. He was educated at a monastic center, possibly Cor Tewdws under St. Illtud, where he chose to forsake his royal heritage and embrace monasticism. He became a renowned teacher, converting many to Christianity and founding numerous churches and monasteries throughout Britain and Ireland. He is thought to have made a pilgrimage to Rome before emigrating to Brittany, where he took on the life of a hermit. However, his life of solitude was short-lived, and pupils soon sought him out and begged him to teach them. He eventually founded a monastery for these students at Rhuys, where he wrote De Excidio Britanniae, criticising British rulers and exhorting them to put off their sins and embrace true Christian faith. He is thought to have died at Rhuys, and was buried there.

There are two different historical versions of the life of Gildas, the first written by an anonymous monk in the 9th century, and the other written by Caradoc of Llancarfan in the middle of the 12th century. Some historians have attempted to explain the differences in the versions by saying that there were two saints named Gildas, but the more general opinion is that there was only one St. Gildas and that the discrepancies between the two versions can be accounted for by the fact that they were written several centuries apart.[6] The 9th century Rhuys Life is generally accepted as being more accurate.

Rhuys Life

The First Life of St. Gildas was written by an unnamed monk at the monastery which Gildas founded in Rhuys, Brittany in the 9th century. According to this tradition, Gildas is the son of Caunus, king of Alt Clut in the Hen Ogledd, the Brythonic-speaking region of northern Britain. He had four brothers; his brother Cuillum ascended to the throne on the death of his father, but the rest became monks in their own right. Gildas was sent as a child to the College of Theodosius (Cor Tewdws) in Glamorgan, under the care of St. Illtud, and was a companion of St. Sampson and St. Paul of Léon. His master St. Illtud loved him tenderly and taught him with special zeal. He was supposed to be educated in liberal arts and divine scripture, but elected to study only holy doctrine, and to forsake his noble birth in favour of a religious life.

After completing his studies under St. Illtud, Gildas went to Ireland where he was ordained as a priest. He returned to his native lands in northern Britain where he acted as a missionary, preaching to the pagan people and converting many of them to Christianity. He was then asked by Ainmericus, high king of Ireland (Ainmuire mac Sétnai, 566–569), to restore order to the church in Ireland, which had altogether lost the Christian faith. Gildas obeyed the king’s summons and travelled all over the island, converting the inhabitants, building churches, and establishing monasteries. He then travelled to Rome and Ravenna where he performed many miracles, including slaying a dragon while in Rome. Intending to return to Britain, he instead settled on the Isle of Houat off Brittany where he led a solitary, austere life. At around this time, he also preached to Nonnita, the mother of Saint David, while she was pregnant with the saint.

He was eventually sought out by those who wished to study under him, and was entreated to establish a monastery in Brittany. He built an oratory on the bank of the River Blavetum (River Blavet), today known as St. Gildas de Rhuys. Fragments of letters that he wrote reveal that he composed a Rule for monastic life that was somewhat less austere than the Rule written by Saint David. Ten years after leaving Britain, he wrote an epistolary book in which he reproved five of the British kings. He died at Rhuys on 29 January 570, and his body was placed on a boat and allowed to drift, according to his wishes. Three months later, on 11 May, men from Rhuys found the ship in a creek with the body of Gildas still intact. They took the body back to Rhuys and buried it there.

Llancarfan Life: Gildas and King Arthur

The second “Life” of St. Gildas was written by Caradoc of Llancarfan, a friend of Geoffrey of Monmouth and his Norman patrons. However, Llancarfan’s work is most probably historically inaccurate, as his hagiographies tend towards the fictitious, rather than the strictly historical. Llancarfan’s “Life” was written in the 12th century, and includes many elements of what have come to be known as mythical pseudo-histories, involving King Arthur, Guinevere, and Glastonbury Abbey, leading to the general opinion that this “life” is less historically accurate than the earlier version. For example, according to the dates in the Annales Cambriae, Gildas would have been a contemporary of King Arthur: however, Gildas’ work never mentions Arthur by name, even though he gives a history of the Britons, and states that he was born in the same year as the Battle of Badon Hill, in which Arthur is supposed to have vanquished the Saxons.

In the Llancarfan Life, St. Gildas was the son of Nau, king of Scotia. Nau had 24 sons, all victorious warriors. Gildas studied literature as a youth, before leaving his homeland for Gaul, where he studied for seven years. When he returned, he brought back an extensive library with him, and was sought after as a master teacher. He became the most renowned teacher in all of the three kingdoms of Britain. Gildas was a subject of the mythical King Arthur, whom he loved and desired to obey. However, his 23 brothers were always rising up against their rightful king, and his eldest brother, Hueil, would submit to no rightful high king, not even Arthur. Hueil would often swoop down from Scotland to fight battles and carry off spoils, and during one of these raids, Hueil was pursued and killed by King Arthur. When news of his brother’s murder reached Gildas in Ireland, he was greatly grieved, but was able to forgive Arthur, and pray for the salvation of his soul. Gildas then travelled to Britain, where he met Arthur face to face, and kissed him as he prayed for forgiveness, and Arthur accepted penance for murdering Gildas’ brother.

After this, Gildas taught at the school of St. Cadoc, before retiring to a secret island for seven years. Pirates from the Orkney Islands came and sacked his island, carrying off goods and his friends as slaves. In distress, he left the island, and came to Glastonbury, then ruled by Melvas, King of the ‘Summer Country’ (Gwlad yr Haf, Somerset). Gildas intervened between King Arthur and Melvas, who had abducted and raped Arthur’s wife Guinevere and brought her to his stronghold at Glastonbury. Arthur soon arrived to besiege him, but, the peacemaking saint persuaded Melvas to release Guinevere and the two kings made peace. Then desiring to live a hermit’s life, Gildas built a hermitage devoted to the Trinity on the banks of the river at Glastonbury. He died, and was buried at Glastonbury Abbey, in the floor of St. Mary’s Church.

The Llancarfan Life contains the earliest surviving appearance of the abduction of Guinevere episode, common in later Arthurian literature. Huail’s enmity with Arthur was also apparently a popular subject in medieval Britain: he is mentioned as an enemy of Arthur’s in the Welsh prose tale Culhwch and Olwen, written around 1100. A strongly held tradition in North Wales places the beheading of Gildas’ brother Huail at Ruthin, where what is believed to be the execution stone has been preserved in the town square. Another brother of Gildas, Celyn ap Caw, was based in the north-east corner of Anglesey.

De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae

Gildas is best known for his polemic De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, which recounts the sub-Roman history of Britain, and which is the only substantial source for history of this period written by a near-contemporary.

The work is a sermon in three parts condemning the acts of his contemporaries, both secular and religious. The first part consists of Gildas’ explanation for his work and a brief narrative of Roman Britain from its conquest under the Principate to Gildas’ time. He describes the doings of the Romans and the Groans of the Britons, in which the Britons make one last request for military aid from the departed Roman military. He excoriates his fellow Britons for their sins, while at the same time lauding heroes such as Ambrosius Aurelianus, whom he is the first to describe as a leader of the resistance to the Saxons. He mentions the victory at the Battle of Mons Badonicus, a feat attributed to King Arthur in later texts, though Gildas is unclear as to who led the battle.

Part two consists of a condemnation of five British kings, Constantine, Aurelius Conanus, Vortiporius, Cuneglas, and Maelgwn. As it is the only contemporary information about them, it is of particular interest to scholars of British history. Part three is a similar attack on the clergy of the time.

The works of Gildas, including the Excidio, can be found in volume 69 of the Patrologia Latina.

De Excidio is usually dated to the 540s, but the historian Guy Halsall inclines to an “early Gildas” c. 490. Cambridge historian Karen George offers a date range of c. 510–530 AD.

Veneration

Gildas’ relics were venerated in the abbey which he founded in Rhuys, until the 10th century, when they were removed to Berry. In the 18th century, they were said to be moved to the cathedral at Vannes and then hidden during the French Revolution. The various relics survived the revolution and have all since been returned to Saint-Gildas-de-Rhuys where they are visible at various times of the year at a dedicated “treasury” in the village. The body of Saint Gildas (minus the pieces incorporated into various reliquaries) is buried behind the altar in the church of Saint Gildas de Rhuys.[15]

The gold and silver covered relics of Saint Gildas include:

A reliquary head containing parts of the saints skull
An arm reliquary containing bone pieces, topped with a blessing hand
A reliquary femur and knee
The embroidered mitre supposedly worn by Gildas is also kept with these relics. Gildas is the patron saint of several churches and monasteries in Brittany, and his feast day is celebrated on 29 January.

Further traditions

Gildas is credited with a hymn called the Lorica, or Breastplate, a prayer for deliverance from evil, which contains specimens of Hiberno-Latin. A proverb is also attributed to Gildas mab y Gaw in the Englynion y Clyweid in Llanstephan MS. 27.

In Bonedd y Saint, Gildas is recorded as having three sons and a daughter. Gwynnog ap Gildas and Noethon ap Gildas are named in the earliest tracts, together with their sister Dolgar. Another son, Tydech, is named in a later document. Iolo Morganwg adds Saint Cenydd to the list.

The scholar David Dumville suggests that Gildas was the teacher of Finnian of Moville, who in turn was the teacher of St. Columba of Iona.

Source: Wikipedia

San Deicolo di Irlanda e la Francia (+625) – 18 gennaio ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Italian

http://irelandofmyheart.wordpress.com

IRELAND OF MY HEART

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San Deicolo

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San Deicolo di Irlanda e la Francia (+625)

18 gennaio

San Deicolo, in francese Deisle o Desle, in gaelico Dichuil o Dichul (Leinster, 530 circa – Lure, 18 gennaio 625), fu un monaco irlandese, fondatore ed abate di abbazie in Francia.

Discepolo di Colombano di Bobbio, partì con lui nel 576 dall’Irlanda per la Gallia, dove fondarono la grande abbazia di Luxeuil nei Vosgi. Quando nel 610 San Colombano fu esiliato in Italia da Teodorico II, San Deicolo fondò l’abbazia di Lure, arricchita e dotata di ogni genere di beni ad essa necessari dal re merovingio Clotario II, che aveva riconosciuto la qualità spirituali di Deicolo.

A Lure il monaco irlandese trascorse il resto della sua vita sino alla morte, avvenuta verso l’anno 625.

Deicolo era noto per i numerosi miracoli compiuti in vita ed in morte, attribuitigli da una biografia risalente al X secolo, scritta da un monaco di Lure.

Fonte:

Wikipedia &

http://gkiouzelis.wordpress.com

Orthodox Heart Sites

Saint Desle (Deicola / Deicolus), d’Irlande et de France (+625) – 18 janvier ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* French

http://irelandofmyheart.wordpress.com

IRELAND OF MY HEART

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Saint Deicola / Deicolus

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Saint Desle (Deicola / Deicolus),

d’Irlande et de France (+625)

18 janvier

La vie de saint Desle (Deicola / Deicolus) est connue par un écrit anonyme de la fin du ixe siècle, la Vita Deicola.

Né en Irlande à une date inconnue, il serait le frère de saint Gall. Il entra tout jeune à l’abbaye de Bangor et vécut attaché à la spiritualité de saint Colomban. Il suivit ce dernier au monastère de Luxeuil où il passa sa vie de 590 à 610.

Au début de l’année 610, à l’instigation du roi Thierry et de Brunehilde, les moines de Luxeuil durent s’exiler et prirent le chemin de Besançon. Sur la route, saint Desle, épuisé, dut laisser partir ses compagnons.

La “Vita Deicola” raconte qu’arrivé ainsi dans la forêt de Darney, il fit jaillir une source en frappant la terre de son bâton et rencontra ensuite un berger qui le conduisit vers une chapelle dédiée à saint Martin, près de laquelle il construisit une cabane.

Plus tard, ayant recouvré la santé, saint Desle partit fonder un nouveau monastère, près de Lure, encouragé par Clotaire II qui lui offrit un vaste domaine. Là, il reprit la règle de Luxeuil, en y apportant quelques adoucissements, se rapprochant de la règle de saint Benoît qui commençait à s’étendre en Occident. Saint Desle entreprit alors un voyage vers Rome afin d’aller faire approuver sa règle par le pape. Il mourut en 625.

Saint Desle est considéré comme un saint guérisseur des maladies des petits enfants, mais aussi comme un protecteur du bétail.

Source:

Wikipedia &

http://gkiouzelis.wordpress.com

Orthodox Heart Sites