Some Orthodox Saints from Ireland, Russia, Norway, Holy Land, France, Egypt, England, Serbia, Asia Minor, Italy, Bulgaria, Spain & Romania – St Catherine’s Vision – PDF

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http://www.saintcatherinesvision.com/assets/files/SCV%20DC%20Saints%20June%202014.pdf

Some Orthodox Saints from Ireland, Russia,

Norway, Holy Land, France, Egypt, England, Serbia, Asia Minor,

Italy, Bulgaria, Spain & Romania

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St Catherine’s Vision

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Saint Begnet of Ireland & her Holy Well in Dalkey Island, Ireland (+7th century) – November 12

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IRELAND OF MY HEART

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Saint Begnet of Ireland and her Holy Well

in Dalkey Island, Ireland (7th century)

Feast day: November 12

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Saint Begnet (also Begneta, Begnete, Begnait or Becnait) is a patron saint of Dalkey, Ireland. The name Begnet is most likely a diminutive form of Beg or Bec. She is noted as a “virgin, not a martyr”. St Begnet was an Irish princess who lived in the 7th century. Her feast day is November 12. Two ruined churches in Dalkey are named for Begnet, one on Dalkey Island, and the other near the 15th-century stone townhouse now serving as Dalkey Castle and Heritage Centre, in the area known as Kilbegnet. A holy well located near the martello tower on the island is also associated with her.

St Begnet’s father was Colman, the son of Aedh in the parish of Kilbegnatan (Kilbegnet or Cill Becnait). Like many other female virgin saints, she is described as beautiful and desirable, but she refused her numerous suitors in favor of religious devotion. Her social status is sometimes given as “Irish princess”, and thus she would have been a valuable bride. She is said variously to have lived as an anchorite or to have served as the first abbess of nuns on a small island off the coast of England.

She gave her name to the two churches in the area and Dalkey town and surrounding area was for many centuries known as Kilbegnet. Perhaps she came from Dalkey, or perhaps she sailed from here to pioneer her religious order. It may also be possible the churches were dedicated to her memory by missionaries, spreading the faith after her death.

As a child, St Begnet was visited by an angel who gave her a bracelet inscribed with a cross as a mark of her vocation.

St Begnet grew up to become a beautiful woman and had many suitors. Her parents arranged her marriage to the son of the King of Norway. But still dedicated to the vows she had taken, Begnet had no wish to take a husband. To avoid marriage, she left home, leaving everything but the bracelet given to her by the Angel. She found passage in a small boat and sailed to Northumbria on the West Coast of England. There she was received into the Church by Bishop Aidan and became the first abbess of nuns. Her convent was constantly plundered by pirates, so after several years Begnet moved inland towards Cumberland.

Her bracelet became an object of veneration after her death.

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Saint Begnet’s Well

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Dalkey Island, Ireland

https://www.google.gr/maps/@53.2748152,-6.0937406,3a,75y,113.8h,72.84t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sj-3Cc5p1Ra7T4VdqSuXEww!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1?hl=el

Dalkey Village, Ireland

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St Begnet’s Church, 9th century

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St Begnet’s Church

The 9th century granite church named after the virgin Saint, St Begnet, probably replaced an earlier wooden church dating back to the Early Christian period. The Nave dates to the 10th century and later the Bellcote and Chancel were added in the 13th century. Inside the Nave on the eastern side of the doorway is a Stoup and there is an Ambry built into the southern wall of the chancel. Scattered throughout the graveyard are a number of decorated headstones and on the northern side of the church is a rare Tau Cross.

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The ruin of the church of St. Begnet on Dalkey Island, Ireland

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Goat Castle, Dalkey Village, Ireland

Dalkey heritage centre

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Rathdown Slab

In the Dalkey heritage centre there is the Rathdown Slab. The slab was found in the graveyard surrounding St Begnet’s Church in 1855. The Rathdown Slabs are usually linked to churches dated to the 11th and 12th century. The first slabs were recorded by Austin Cooper in 1781 and since then the number of viking slabs has risen to around 30. This particular slab is one of the finest examples and standing at about 5 ft tall one of the largest. It is thought the slab may have been decorated originally with viking art such as the cup marks, but that a number of christian symbols such as the large ring with a cross in the centre, may have been added later. Other examples have been recorded at Kilgobbin Church, Rathmichael Church, Whitechurch, Ballyman, Kiltiernan, Tully Church, Killegar and more recently in Dundrum.

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St Begnat’s Church of 9th century

in Dalkey Village

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St Begnet of Dalkey Island, Ireland (+7th ce.)

Sources:

Wikipedia

&

Abel-Tasos Gkiouzelis

http://gkiouzelis.wordpress.com

ORTHODOX HEART SITES

Saint Palladius 1st Bishop of Ireland & Scotland, from France (+450) – July 6

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

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Saint Palladius 1st Bishop of Ireland & Scotland, 

from France (+450)

July 6

Saint Palladius was the first Bishop of the Christians of Ireland, preceding Saint Patrick.

The Palladii were thought to be amongst the most noble families of Gaul, and several of them held high ranks in the Church of Gaul. Saint Palladius was the son of Exuperantius of Poitiers.

Saint Palladius held the (higher) rank of Deacon of Rome.

Saint Palladius was married and had a young daughter. In Rome, he kissed his family goodbye in the manner of the Apostles, and lived as an ascetic in Sicily around 408-409, giving his daughter to a convent on that island. He seems to have been ordained as a priest around 415. He lived in Rome between 418–429, and appears to be the “Deacon Palladius”, responsible for urging Pope Celestine I to send the bishop Germanus to Britain, where he guided the Britons back to the Orthodox faith.

Ireland

In 431, he have been sent as the first bishop to the Christians of Ireland: Palladius, having been ordained by Pope Celestine, is sent as first bishop to the Irish believing in Christ. Palladius landed at Hy-Garchon, where the town of Wicklow now stands.

Irish writers that chronicled the life of St. Patrick state that St. Palladius preached in Ireland before St. Patrick, although he was soon banished by the King of Leinster, and returned to North Britain. According to Muirchu (who lived two centuries later) in the Book of Armagh, God hindered him…and neither did those fierce and cruel men receive his doctrine readily, nor did he himself wish to spend time in a strange land, but returned to him who sent him. Palladius was accompanied by four companions: Sylvester and Solinus, who remained after him in Ireland, and Augustinus and Benedictus, who followed him to Britain but returned to their own country after his death. Palladius is most strongly associated with Leinster, particularly with Clonard, County Meath.

Scotland

According to St. Prosper, Palladius arrived among the Scots in North Britain (in the consulate of Bassus and Antiochus) after he left Ireland in 431. Scottish church tradition holds that he presided over a Christian community there for about 20 years.

 

St Palladius’s Chapel

5th century shrine is among the earliest Christian sites in Scotland.

Fordoun was the site of a chapel founded by the 5th century saint, Palladius, who is said to have preached and died here.

The saint’s relics were preserved in a silver shrine with the chapel that he built at Fordoun.

The chapel – also known as Paldy Kirk – was the mother church for the Mearns region. The ruins of a 13th century chapel built on the site of the original 5th century building can still be seen beside the later church and there is still a well known as St Palladius’s Well in the grounds of the manse.

The ancient ruins were rebuilt in the 16th century and again in 1788. In 1828 the roof collapsed and the chapel was finally abandoned in favour of the new and much grander building we see today. Within the ruined 13th century building is a holy water stoup and an aumbry in the north wall. The three large lancets are a 17th century addition.

The most intriguing feature in the chapel ruins is not above ground however. Protected by a metal grate are stone steps leading down into the earth to a crypt unse the chapel floor.

One plausible theory is that the crypt was where the relics of St Palladius were held, and where pilgrims came to visit his shrine. King Kenneth III was one of those piulgrims; it is said that he was on his way to Fordoun when he died in 994 AD.

In the vestibule of the church is the Fordoun Stone, a beautifully carved Pictish cross slab. This was discovered in 1787 when the pulpit of the chapel was pulled down. The cross may have been hidden here during the Reformation. It shows a marvellously intricate cross and traditional pictish symbols, plus inscriptions in Ogham and a Roman script.

There are several interesting old gravestones near the chapel (some actually leaning agaimst the chapel wall). One stone to William Christison has a rather pointed reminder (literally); a finger points upwards to the heavens above, and a single word is carved – ‘Home’.

Palladius was the first Christian missionery in northern Scotland. He was ordained a priest by Pope Celestine in 430 AD, and is thought to have preached in Ireland before arriving in the Mearns area of Scotland. Presumably he found the natives less than receptive, for his martyrdom occurred not long after his arrival.

The chapel is accessible at any time.

Source:

Wikipedia

Heilige Ia von Irland & Cornwall (+450) ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* German

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

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Heilige Ia von Irland & Cornwall (+450)

#1 – Кад је Енглеска била Православна ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* ORTHODOX ENGLAND – Serbian

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Video: Santes Dilig (St Cenheidlo / St Endelienta) Cymru a Chernyw (+6ed ganrif) ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Welsh

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ORTHODOX HEART SITES

Santes Dilig (St Cenheidlo / St Endelienta)

Cymru a Chernyw (+6ed ganrif)

Saint Indract, St Dominica & their Companions, Martyrs in Shapwick, England, from Ireland (+718) – February 5

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IRELAND OF MY HEART

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Ireland

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Glanstobury Abbey, 7th century

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Holy Icon of Virgin Mary of Glastonbury

with Saints Indract & Dominica

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Saint Indract, St Dominica & their Companions,

Martyrs in Shapwick, England, from Ireland (+718)

February 5

The Irish Saints at Glastonbury c.700

On this day in the Old English Calendar commemorated SS Indractus, Dominica and their Companions. We have to rely on William of Malmsbury for information about these Martyrs, who were venerated at Glastonbury Abbey. Indractus was an Irish chieftain, who had been to Rome on pilgrimage with his wife, Dominica, and nine others, and on their return journey they decided to visit the “Second Rome”, as Glastonbury was called, because of its holy associations.

There is a tradition that both S. Patrick and S. Bridget spent some time at Glastonbury, and there is a district called Beckery, where Bridget is supposed to have founded a Convent at the foot of Weary-all Hill. It was at Mass in the Chapel of St. Mary Magdalene there, according to the History of John of Glastonbury, that King Arthur had the vision of the Cross and Our Lady with the Holy Child, which is commemorated in the Arms of the Abbey. Another Irish Saint claimed as a visitor to Glastonbury is Benignus, locally known as S. Bennings, who was servant and successor to S. Patrick. He settled at Meare three miles to the west, where he died, and his body was translated to the Abbey in 901, some four hundred years later.

These Irish connections may well have been an added attraction to Indractus and his fellow pilgrims, who settled in the district of Shapwick. The local people were heathen and thought the party were wealthy merchants, whereas their scrips only contained parsley and other seeds to be taken back to Ireland, and their pilgrim staves were tipped with brass and not gold. When they had killed them, the natives threw their bodies into a deep pit, but a column of light appeared by night revealing the grave of the Christian martyrs. Their bodies were taken up and buried in the Abbey in the eighth century during the restoration under King Ina.

Source:

http://celticsaints.org

http://celticsaints.org/2016/0205a.html

CELTIC SAINTS

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Glastonbury Abbey, England

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