Святой Тициан (St Titian) епископ Одерцо, Италия (+632) – день памяти, 16 января ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Russian

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RUSSIA OF

ITALY OF MY HEART

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Святой Тициан (St Titian) епископ Одерцо, Италия (+632)

день памяти, 16 января

Святой Тициан родился в благородной семье в Гераклее (Eraclea), античном городе, расположенном в Венецианской лагуне. Его учителем был Флориан (Floriano), епископ Одерцо (Opitergium), который поставил святого сначала диаконом, потом — священником, и, наконец, назначил экономом епархии.

Благотвориательная деятельность святого Тициана сделала его известным в тех краях, и когда Флориан оставил свою кафедру, дабы удалиться в Равенну или в Пулу, вероятно, по причине так называемого Раскола трёх глав, Тициан был избран на его место ко всеобщей радости, вопреки его собственному нежеланию. Он окормлял тамошнюю паству на протяжении более чем тридцати лет.

Святой Тициан был известен своими набожностью и благочестивостью, даром предвидения, а также крайним неприятием арианства, впоследствии весьма распространённого среди лангобардского населения.

Считается, что святой Тициан отошёл ко Господу в Одерцо 16 января 632 года и был похоронен в городском соборе, не сохранившемся до наших дней. Тело святого было перенесено в собор города Сенеда (Ceneda), пригороде Витторио-Венето

Источник: Wikipedia

Saint Paraskevi the Holy & Glorious Virgin-Martyr of Greece, from Rome (+161) – Patron Saint of the eyes – July 26

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Holy Skull of St. Paraskevi in Petraki Monastery, Athens, Greece

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Saint Paraskevi the Holy & Glorious Virgin-Martyr of Greece, from Rome (+161)

Patron Saint of the eyes

July 26

The holy and glorious Virgin-Martyr Saint Paraskevi (also Paraskeva) was arrested during the reign of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius (r. A.D. 138-161) under the penalty of refusing to worship idols and adhering to the state pagan religion. After enduring many tortures, she was eventually released by the emperor, continuing to profess Christ. She was eventually tortured and beheaded by the Roman governor Tarasius in the year 180. The Church commemorates her on July 26.

Saint Paraskevi, The Parthenomartyr, (July 26th), was born in a village near Rome during the reign of Hadrian (117-138 AD). Her parents were the pious Christians Agathonikos (Agathon) and Politea. Her parents prayed fervently for a child, and God finally blessed their piety. They gave great honor to Friday, the day of Our Lord’s suffering. Being born on this day, her parents named her Paraskevi (“Friday” in Greek, but literally “preparation”).

St Paraskevi obtained an excellent education from both secular and Scriptural instructors. She was also very knowledgeable in the field of philosophy. Bolstered by her Christian upbringing, she often conversed with other women about Christianity, trying to strengthen their faith in this new religion. Many distinguished families wanted this beautiful, educated and rich woman to marry their sons. Her understanding and kindness made her even more desirable. However having a higher goal in life, St Paraskevi rejected any marriage proposals.

When she was 20 years old, both her parents died 1eaving her as the sole heir to the family fortune. St Paraskevi did not use her fortune for herself. Filled with the spirit of Christ and Christian ideals, she sold all her worldly possessions using the money to relieve human suffering. There was a portion retained to a community treasury that supported a home for reverent virgins who stayed in a kenobion, a type of commune like a contemporary monastery. These women prayed and fasted doing charitable works. They preached primarily to Hebrew and idol worshiping women giving them an opportunity to learn about Christian salvation.

She left Rome at the age of 30 and began her holy mission, passing through many cities and villages. St Paraskevi’s activities occurred during a period that the Jews and Romans persecuted the Christian religion with the greatest intensity. Antoninus Pius (138-161) ruled Rome at this time, and he did not execute Christians without a trial. She was not caught immediately or put to death. Instead, Antoninus protected Christians against the blind mania of the Jewish and Roman inhabitants. Christians could only be brought to trial if another citizen lodged a formal complaint against them. Antoninus however had to repeal this law because of the many disasters which had befallen Rome and which were blamed on the Christians.

Strong in faith, learning, and eloquence, Paraskevi spoke persuasively to her fellow Roman citizens, leading them from idolatry to faith in Christ. Eventually, Antoninus heard of St. Paraskevi’s holy mission. Upon her return to Rome, several Jews filed complaints about her and Antoninus summoned her to his palace to question her. Attracted by her beauty and humility he tried with kind words to make her denounce her faith, even promising to marry her and make her an empress. Angered by her refusal he had a steel helmet, lined with nails and compressed on her head with a vice. It had no effect on the Saint and many who witnessed this miracle converted to Christianity. Thrown into prison, Paraskevi asked God to give her the strength to face the terror that awaited her. Antoninus again continued her torture by having her hung by her hair and at the same time burning her hands and arms with torches. The Saint suffered greatly, but had the will not to submit to the pain. Antoninus then prepared a large cauldron of oil and tar, boiled the mixture and then had Paraskevi immersed in it. Miraculously she stood in it as if she being refreshed rather than burned. Angered, Antoninus thought that she was using witchery to keep the contents cooled. Antoninus then approached the cauldron only to be blinded by the hot steam and searing emissions coming from the area. At this moment the mighty emperor asked for the intervention of St Paraskevi to heal him from this affliction to which she responded:

“Emperor, the Christian God is healing you from the blindness that was given to you as a punishment”.

Immediately, he regained his sight. Humbled by the miracle he freed the Saint, allowing her to continue her missionary activity and ended all persecutions against the Christians throughout the Roman Empire.

From this episode it is clear to the Christians that St Paraskevi has the intercessional ability to help people with visual ailments.

Astonished by the miracle, Antoninus released Paraskevi. He also ceased persecuting Christians throughout the Roman Empire.

This period was brief. After Antoninus’ death in 161, a plague broke out throughout the empire. Romans took it as a sign from their gods that that they were angered by the tolerance of Christianity. Under Antoninus’ successor, Marcus Aurelius (161-180), the laws dealing with “non-believers” were cahnged and the persecutions against the Christians resumed.

Despite these dangers, Paraskevi persevered in her missionary endeavors, spreading the Gospel wherever she traveled. By authority of emperor Aurelius the provincial eparchs Asclepius and Tarasios captured St Paraskevi. Having refused Asclepius’ demands to sacrifice to pagan gods, she was thrown into a snake pit. The Saint made the Sign of the Cross over the serpent and the serpent perished. Asclepius had heard of the Saint’s previous miracles, realized that a great and mighty power guarded Paraskevi and decided to set her free while Asclepius and his court were all converted.

Tarasios however was less tolerant. St Paraskevi was tied and beaten and afterwards imprisoned and a huge rock placed on her chest. She prayed to Christ to help her be strong. The next morning Paraskevi was taken willingly to the Temple of Apollo. Everyone praised Tarasios, thinking that he had succeeded in breaking St Paraskevi’s faith. However, upon entering the temple, the Saint raised her hand and made the sign of the cross. Suddenly, a loud noise was heard and all the idols in the temple were destroyed. The priests and idolaters dragged her from the altar, beat her, and pushed her out of the temple. The priests demanded that Tarasios kill Paraskevi. She was convicted and condemned to death by beheading.

It was customary to give the condemned their last wish. She asked to be left alone for a few moments so that she might pray for the last time. Afterwards, the roman soldiers returned and executed the Saint.

Many healing miracles occurred as a result of St Paraskevi’s divine intervention. It is said that that merely coming in contact with he dirt of her grave faithful, crippled could walk, demonized would return to health and that the infertile would bear children. Most importantly St Paraskevi healed the blindness of the roman emperor Antoninus Pius while she was in a heated cauldron. Her merciful disposition to her tormentor has made her an intercessor Saint for the healing of eye ailments.

Her remains were eventually taken to Constantinople, where they are venerated by the faithful to this very day.

Appropriate to your calling, O Champion Paraskevi, you worshipped with the readiness your name bears. For an abode you obtained faith, which is your namesake. Wherefore, you pour forth healing and intercede for our souls.

O most majestic One, we have discovered your temple to be a spiritual clinic wherein all the faithful resoundingly honor you, O famed and venerable martyr Paraskevi.

Tomb in Pounta, Greece

According to the tradition of the people of Epirus, Paraskevi was not martyred in Rome as mentioned in her traditional hagiography, but in Thesprotia where the Monastery of Saint Paraskevi of Pounta stands today. According to this tradition, strongly held by the locals, the headless body of the saint was entombed here and her tomb is still venerated today.

It is said that the persecutors of St. Paraskevi dragged her to the edge of the river Acheron to behead her. As the sword was raised over her head, she grabbed a stone pillar that she held so tightly that the print of her hands melted into it leaving an indelible mark. A church was eventually erected here by the faithful in her honor and housed her holy relics. Her skull was eventually placed in the walls of the church, though today it is kept in Moni Petraki in Athens.

According to the author and novelist Spyros Mouselimis, in his article “The Monastery of Pountas and the Feast of Saint Paraskevi” (Ηπειρωτική Εστία, 10, pp. 638-641, 1961), Pountas Monastery was known for its healing waters and numerous miracles. The pilgrims would cut off portions of the stone pillar of St. Paraskevi as a talisman, to the point that in 1960 the size of the stone was half its original size.

The property of the Monastery at one time was very great. According to Lambridis, at the end of the 19th century the annual revenue of the Monastery was 20,000 piastres, from which a boarding school was supported on its premises until 1913. After the population exchange of 1923 the Monastery was abandoned and did not operate again until 1975. Only the eastern side of the original Holy Altar area of the Katholikon survives today, while the rest of the church was restored in 1989 together with the inscription for the tomb of St. Paraskevi.

Today the Monastery operates as a female convent.

Source: Orthodox Wiki

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Saint Telemachus, the Monk Martyr who stopped the gladiatorial fights in Rome (+391) – January 1

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Saint Telemachus,

the Monk Martyr who stopped the gladiatorial fights in Rome (+391)

January 1

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Saint Telemachus (also Almachus or Almachius) was a monk who, according to the Church historian Theodoret, tried to stop a gladiatorial fight in a Roman amphitheatre, and was stoned to death by the crowd. The Christian Emperor Honorius, however, was impressed by the monk’s martyrdom and it spurred him to issue a historic ban on gladiatorial fights. Saint Telemachus martyred on 391. The last known gladiatorial fight in Rome was on 1 January 404 AD.

He is described as being an ascetic who came to Rome from the East. The story is found in the writings of Theodoret, Bishop of Cyrrhus, Syria.

Although the site of Telemachus’ martyrdom is often given as being the Colosseum in Rome, Theodoret does not actually specify where it happened, saying merely that it happened in “the stadium”.

Later retellings of the story have differed from Theodoret’s in a number of details. Foxe’s Book of Martyrs claims that Telemachus was first stabbed to death by a gladiator, but that the sight of his death “turned the hearts of the people”.

There is also an alternate form of the story, in which Telemachus stood up in the amphitheatre and told the assembly to stop worshipping idols and offering sacrifices to the gods. Upon hearing this statement, the prefect of the city is said by this source to have ordered the gladiators to kill Telemachus, and they promptly did so.

Source: Wikipedia

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Saint Lucy the Virgin Martyr of Syracuse in Sicily, Italy (+304)

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Sicily, Italy

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Saint Lucy the Virgin Maryr of Syracuse in Sicily, Italy (+304)

December 13

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

The Holy Relics of Saint Lucy

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St Lucy’s Grave

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GOD IS WONDERFUL IN HIS SAINTS

During Diocletian’s persecutians, the Christian maiden Lucy went with her mother on pilgrimage to the tomb of St Agatha (February 5), to pray for her mother’s healing from an ailment. Saint Agatha appeared to Lucy in a dream and said ‘Lucy, my sister, why do you ask from me what your own faith can obtain? Your mother is healed. You will soon be the glory of Syracuse as I am of Catania.’ Lucy’s mother was healed from that day, and Lucy determined to consecrate herself entirely to God. She broke off an engagement to a nobly-born young man and gave her large dowry of land and jewels to the poor. Her would-be husband angrily denounced her as a Christian to the Governor of Syracuse.

At the tribunal, Lucy firmly confessed her faith in Christ and refused to make sacrifice to the gods. The Governor ordered that she be placed in a brothel, but his minions were unable to move her from the place where she stood, even when they tied her with ropes and attempted to drag her with oxen. The Governor asked what witchcraft she used, to which she answered ‘I do not use witchcraft — it is the power of God that is with me. Bring ten thousand of your men if you wish; they will not be able to move me unless God wills it.’ The men then lit a fire around her, but it did not harm her. Finally they beheaded her where she stood. With her last words, she predicted the deaths of Maximian and Diocletian, and the coming of peace to the Church.

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Saint Bonosa the Virgin Martyr in Porto Romano, Ostia, Italy (+207)

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Ostia, Italy

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Saint Bonosa of Porto Romano, Ostia, Italy (+207)

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Saint Bonosa the Virgin Martyr,

in Porto Romano, Ostia, Italy (+207)

July 15

Saint Bonosa the Virgin Martyr, martyred at Porto Romano, at the mouth of the Tiber, near Rome & Ostia on 207.

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The Holy Relics of Saint Bonona

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Sainte Artemia de Rome la fille de Dioclétien (+309) & Sainte Alexandra la impératrice et épouse de Dioclétien (+303) – French

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Rome, Ville des Martyrs

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Sainte Artemia de Rome

la fille de Dioclétien (+309)

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Sainte Alexandra de Rome

la impératrice et épouse de Dioclétien (+303)

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SYNAXARION-HAGIOLOGY

Sainte Alexandra de Rome, morte le 21 avril 303, est une martyre de l’Église.

On connaît la vie de sainte Alexandra à travers les hagiographies de saint Georges transmises jusqu’à nous, où elle est nommée comme impératrice et épouse de Dioclétien. Elle reconnaît sa foi au Christ au moment des souffrances de saint Georges et son époux la condamne pour cela à mourir par l’épée.

Elle est souvent représentée dans les icônes de saint Georges.

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Saint Marcel Ier Pape de Rome (+309)

16 janvier

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Saint Marcel Ier, natif de Rome, fut le 30e Pape de l’Église de Rome du 27 mai 308 au 16 janvier 309. Il succédait à Marcellin (296-304) après quatre ans de vacance du siège pontifical, à une époque où les persécutions contre les chrétiens (Persécution de Dioclétien) étaient très importantes.

Saint Marcel Ier dut réorganiser le culte dans des bâtiments provisoires, les églises ayant été saccagées sous Dioclétien, en établissant vingt-cinq presbytéraux à Rome. Il dut aussi gérer le cas des chrétiens apostats, qui avaient renié le Christ depuis la persécution de l’empereur Dèce et aurait exigé d’eux un acte de pénitence.

L’empereur Maxence, irrité contre le franc-parler de saint Marcel, l’aurait réduit à l’état d’esclave et transformé en palefrenier.

Saint Marcel fut surpris en train de célébrer la messe dans la demeure d’une Dame. L’empereur Maximien fit transformer la riche demeure en étable et condamna le pontife à garder les bestiaux.

Saint Marcel Ier est probablement mort le 16 janvier 309 et aurait été enseveli à Rome, dans la catacombe de Priscille où reposent de nombreux martyrs.

Il a été canonisé et est fêté le 16 janvier. Il est le saint patron des grainetiers.

Source:

Wikipedia

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Sainte Alexandra de Rome

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Saint Virgin-Martyr Artemia of Rome the daughter of Emperor Diocletian & Saint Martyr Alexandra of Rome the wife of Emperor Diocletian of Rome (April 21, +303 & June 7, +309) 

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Saint Virgin-Martyr Artemia of Rome (+303)

the daughter of Queen St Alexandra & Emperor Diocletian of Rome

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St Marcellos I Bishop of Rome (+309)

June 7

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Saint Alexandra of Rome (+303)

the mother of St Artemia & wife of Emperor Diocletian of Rome

April 21

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Rome the City of Martyrs

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SYNAXARION-HAGIOLOGY

Saint Virgin-Martyr Artemia of Rome martyred in 309 in Rome, the City of the Martyrs, along with many Christians. Before 6 years martyred her mother Saint Queen Alexandra the wife of  Emperor Diocletian in Nicomedia in Asia Minor (+303).

Saint Virgin-Martyr Artemia of Rome (+309) was the daughter of the Emperor Diocletian, and suffered from demonic oppression. Learning that the prisoner St Cyriacus the Deacon could heal infirmities and cast out devils, the emperor summoned him to the sick girl. In gratitude for healing his daughter, the emperor freed Cyriacus, Smaragdus and Largus. Soon the emperor sent St Cyriacus to Persia to heal the daughter of the Persian emperor.

Upon his return to Rome, St Cyriacus was arrested on orders of the emperor Galerius, the son-in-law of Diocletian, who had abdicated and retired as emperor. Galerius was very annoyed at his predecessor because his daughter Artemia had converted to Christianity. He gave orders to drag St Cyriacus behind his chariot stripped, bloodied, and in chains, to be shamed and ridiculed by the crowds.

St Marcellus I Bishop of Rome, denounced the emperor openly before everyone for his cruelty toward innocent Christians. The emperor ordered the holy bishop to be beaten with rods, and dealt severely with him. Sts Cyriacus, Smaragdus, Largus, and another prisoner, Crescentian, died under torture. And at this time the emperor’s daughter Artemia and another twenty-one prisoners were also executed with St Cyriacus the Deacon.

Source:

http://oca.org/saints/lives/2016/06/07/101658-martyr-princess-artemia-of-rome

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Saint Alexandra of Rome (+303)

the mother of St Artemia & wife of Emperor Diocletian of Rome

April 21

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Saint Alexandra of Rome — Christian martyr and saint, known from “Martyrdom of Saint George” as either Emperor Diocletian’s wife.

Saint Alexandra was the wife of the Emperor Diocletian and was secretly converted to Christianity. While Saint George was being tortured, Alexandra went to the arena, bowed before him and professed her faith openly. When she questioned whether she was worthy of paradise and of martyrdom without being baptized, Saint George told her “Do not fear, for your blood will baptize you.” She was denounced a Christian and imprisoned on her husband’s orders in Nicomedia, then sentenced to die.

Her husband was so outraged by her conversion that he is said to have uttered “What! Even thou hast fallen under their spell!” Alexandra quietly accepted her sentence and prayed as the guards walked her to the place of execution. She asked if she could rest for a moment. The guards allowed this. She rested by the place of Saint George’s execution at Nicomedia’s City Wall.

Her three servants Apollo, Isaac and Codratus went to prison with her, the first two died of hunger while the last was beheaded with her on April 21, 303 a.d. Her feast day is usually celebrated on April 23, when she is commemorated at the same time along with the soldier martyrs Anatolios and Protoleon and the 630 others who were martyred for professing faith while witnessing George’s martyrdom.

Source:

Wikipedia

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Holy Icons of Saint Alexandra of Rome (+303)

the mother of St Artemia & wife of Emperor Diocletian of Rome

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Saint Valentine the Priest-Martyr of Rome (+269) an Orthodox Saint, the Mariagge & the Love – Feast days: February 14, January 19 & July 5

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http://orthodoxsaintvalentine.wordpress.com

ORTHODOX SAINT VALENTINE

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The Real Life of Saint Valentine (+269)

Feast days:

February 14, January 19 & July 5

The ancient martyrology of the Church of Rome marks February 14th as the remembrance of “the martyr Valentine, presbyter of Rome” (Valentinus means “vigorous” in Latin).

The Martyrdom of Saint Valentine in Rome

Saint Valentine lived in Rome in the third century and was a priest who helped the martyrs during the persecution of Emperor Claudius II the Goth. The great virtue and catechetical activities of the Saint had become familiar. For this he was arrested and brought before the imperial court.

“Why, Valentine, do you want to be a friend of our enemies and reject our friendship?” asked the emperor.

The Saint replied “My lord, if you knew the gift of God, you would be happy together with your empire and would reject the worship of idols and worship the true God and His Son Jesus Christ.”

One of these judges stopped the Saint and asked him what he thought about Jupiter and Mercury, and Valentine boldly replied, “They are miserable, and spent their lives through corruption and crime!”

The judge furiously shouted, “He blasphemes against the gods and against the empire!”

The emperor, however, continued his questions with curiosity, and found a welcome opportunity to finally learn what was the faith of Christians. Valentine then found the courage to urge him to repent for the blood of the Christians that was shed. “Believe in Jesus Christ, be baptized and you will be saved, and from this time forward the glory of your empire will be ensured as well as the triumph of your armory.”

Claudius became convinced, and said to those who were present: “What a beautiful teaching this man preaches.”

But the mayor of Rome, dissatisfied, began to shout: “See how this Christian mislead our Prince.”

Then Claudius brought the Saint to another judge. He was called Asterios, and he had a little girl who was blind for two years. Listening about Jesus Christ, that He is the Light of the World, he asked Valentine if he could give that light to his child. St. Valentine put his hand on her eyes and prayed: “Lord Jesus Christ, true Light, illuminate this blind child.” Oh the great miracle! The child saw! So the judge with all his family confessed Christ. Having fasted for three days, he destroyed the idols that were in the house and finally received Holy Baptism.

When the emperor heard about all these events, he initially thought not to punish them, thinking that in the eyes of the citizens he will look weak, which forced him to betray his sense of justice. Therefore St. Valentine along with other Christians, after they were tortured, were beheaded on 14 February in the year 268 (or 269).

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3 photos from the Holy Relics of Saint Valentine

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The Relics of Saint Valentine in Athens, Greece

After the martyrdom some Christians salvaged the body of the Saint and put a bit of his blood in a vile. The body of the martyr was moved and buried in the Catacombs of St. Priscilla, a burial place of most of the martyrs. Over the years somehow he was “forgotten” since almost every day there were buried in these catacombs new martyrs for several decades. The memory of Valentine’s martyrdom however remained robust, particularly in the local Church of Rome. Officially the memory of St. Valentine was established in 496 by Pope St. Gelasius.

Roman Catholics were detached from the body of the Church in 1054 AD. So Saint Valentine is a Saint of the Holy, One, Apostolic & Catholic Orthodox Church (Eastern Orthodox Church) because he martyred on 269 AD before the Great Schism.

Fifteen centuries pass and we arrive at 1815, at which time the divine intention was to “disturb” the eternal repose of the Saint. Then the relics were donated by the Pope to a gentle Italian priest (according to the custom of the time). After this the relics are “lost” again until 1907 where we find them in Mytilene (Lesvos Island, Greece) in the Roman Catholic Church of Our Lady. It seems that after the death of the priest that a descendant of his had inherited the relics who had migrated to Mytilene, which was then a thriving community of West-European Catholic Christians. There they remained until 1990 when they were moved to Athens in a Roman Catholic Italian community, where they are today.

Saint Valentine the Greek, 

from Athens, Greece

We should first say that there is not sufficient information on the national origin of the Saint, though there are some other (shades of) evidence that the Saint was of Greek origin. For example, the earliest depiction of the Saint bearing the inscription «O ΑΓΙΟC BAΛΕΝΤΙΝΟC” in Greek, is in the Church of Our Lady the Ancient (Santa Maria Antiqua) of the 6th century which was the parish of Greeks in Rome. The church particularly venerated saints who were Greeks and generally from the East. The decoration and renovation of the church was ordered by the Greek Pope John VII (705-707) and finished by his successors, including the last Greek Pope Zacharias (741-752). But perhaps it is no coincidence that after seventeen centuries, the remains arrived in Greece.

We hope that the Holy Relics of St. Valentine will return soon to his Home, to the Eastern Orthodox Church, as recently miraculously returned the Holy Relics of St. Savvas the Sanctified which they had the Roman Catholics as in 1965.

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Photos: The Holy Relics of St Sabbas the Sanctified

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Video: The miraculous return of the Relics of Saint Sabbas the Sanctified

from Roman Catholics to Eastern Orthodox Church

St. Sabbas the Sanctified during his lifetime told his disciples that his incorrupt body would be removed from his monastery and later would rest in the Lavra, which he founded. He said this return of his relics would come before the end of the world. This prophecy was fulfilled when the holy relics of St. Sabbas were stolen by the crusaders of the First Crusade (1096 – 1099) together with many other relics and brought to Venice, Italy where he was enshrined in a church dedicated to St. Anthony. Nearly nine centuries later his relics were returned to Israel.

On 10 October 1965 the relics of St. Savvas were returned by Pope Paul VI to the Patriarchate of Jerusalem. The reception was made, at the direction of Patriarch Benediktos of Jerusalem, by Bishop Vasilios of Jerusalem, Fr. Theodosios the Abbot of Bethany, Fr. Seraphim the Abbot of St. Savvas Lavra, and the Hierodeacon (and future Metropolitan of Nazareth) Kyriakos.

Though it is commonly recorded that this gesture on behalf of the Pope was made merely as an ecumenical gesture, such as that of the skull of St. Andrew in Patras, with regards to the return of the relics of St. Savvas there is more to the story. In fact, it was St. Savvas himself who was urging Pope Paul VI to have his relics returned, appearing first to his predecessor Pope John XXIII in his dreams and causing a scene in his reliquary.

Fr. Seraphim, the Abbot of St. Savvas Lavra, explains everything as follows:

“The Pope did not give us the holy relic because he loved us, but because he [St. Savvas] would constantly appear to him [Pope John XXIII] and would bother him to have his relics returned to his monastery. When the Pope died he did not take the wishes of the Saint into account, so he appeared again to his successor [Pope Paul VI]. Even in the church where his holy relics were treasured in a glass coffin, he would hit the glass and cause trouble, frightening the guards and the Latin monks.”

Patriarch Benediktos had insisted that Fr. Seraphim attend the reception of the relics. He even told the Abbot: “In your days, Fr. Seraphim, Saint Savvas has returned!” Fr. Seraphim responded: “No, in your days, Your Holiness.”

When the Orthodox representatives arrived at the Church of Saint Anthony in Venice they wondered if indeed these were the relics of Saint Savvas. Fr. Seraphim observed every inch of the incorrupt relic to see if he could see a sign of authenticity. He noticed that one of the eyes of St. Savvas was missing. This proved it for him, since in his biography it is said that the Monophysites removed one of his eyes. Moved by this Fr. Seraphim would not leave the side of the relics till they arrived at his monastery. Even when the holy relics arrived in Athens where they were to be venerated by the faithful prior to the return, Fr. Seraphim stood all night guarding the holy relics while everyone else was sleeping. Metropolitan Kyriakos of Nazareth describes the scene as if Fr. Seraphim and St. Savvas were having a conversation that night.

A problem arose when it came time to dress the holy relics in Orthodox vestments, since the Latins had dressed him in Latin vestments. After nine centuries it would be impossible to manoeuvre the body so as to put on the rason, the monastic schema and epitrachelion among other things. To further complicate matters, the hands of St. Savvas were crossed over his chest. Metropolitan Kyriakos of Nazareth describes what then happened as follows: “We then saw Abbot Seraphim kneel before the holy relics and pray for a good amount of time. At one point he arose and did prostrations and lifted the arms of Saint Savvas as one would a living man before the amazed eyes of us all.” They were able to change the vestments without a problem in Venice before the return to Jerusalem.

When the glass coffin arrived at the Piazza San Marco on the pier, there was a gondola that transported it by escort to an area near the airport. In a strange coincidence it was the same pier the sacred relic had disembarked centuries ago. Countless pigeons were gathered there, as if they were there to honor the event. Even many years later, when Fr. Seraphim and Metropolitan Kyriakos would reminisce about those days, they would always talk about the pigeons.

When the holy relics finally arrived in Jerusalem it was first brought to the Church of the Resurrection for many days. Here the women could venerate the holy relics prior to being brought permanently to the all-male monastic Lavra of St. Sabbas. Fr. Seraphim tells of a certain miracle at this time in Jerusalem. An Orthodox nun who was waiting to venerate the holy relics had doubts over whether or not the Latin’s had indeed given the authentic relics to the Orthodox. It was then that she saw the head of St. Savvas lift and turn to her, then it returned again in its place. Her joy removed all doubts.

(Elder Seraphim of Saint Sabba’s Monastery, Publications Migdonia – Greek book)

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Saint Valentine: Patron of married andall that unite them love

and want to marry with Orthodox Christian Marriage.

Apart from the historical data we have for Valentine’s life, there is accompanied various stories, such as from those who say he is the patron Saint of married and all that unite them love and want to marry with Orthodox Christian Marriage.

The Saint had a reputation as a peacemaker, and one day while cultivating some roses from his garden, he heard a couple quarrel very vigorously. This shocked the Saint, who then cut a rose and approached the couple asking them to hear him. Even though they were dispirited, they obeyed the Saint and afterwards were offered a rose that blessed them. Immediately the love returned between them, and later they returned and asked the Saint to bless their marriage. Another tradition says that one of the charges against Valentine was that he did not adhere to the command of the emperor which stated that men who had not fulfilled their military obligations were not allowed to marry; meanwhile the Saint had blessed the marriage of young Christian soldiers with their beloveds.

Besides all this, the likely choice of him as the “saint of lovers” is to be associated with the pagan festival of Lupercalia, a fertility festival, celebrated by the Romans on February 15. Others connect the celebration of this feast with the mating season of birds during this period. Certainly, however, the Saint has nothing to do with the commercialism (marketing) of flowers, gifts and secular centers which trivialize Eros, this great gift of God.

Saint Valentine and Orthodoxy

Many, however, raise the objection that St. Valentine is not mentioned anywhere in the calendar of the Orthodox Church. Indeed on 14 February in the calendar of the Church there are commemorated Saints Auxentios, Maron and the martyrs Nicholas and Damian. The explanation is simple: in ancient times hagiographic directories, biographies and martyrologia were written to be primarily used locally in their own character, and the fame and reputation of a saint locally does not mean that it extended also throughout the Church. So there may be saints honored widely in one region and completely unknown in another, eg, St. Demetrios, who is famous throughout the Eastern Church, yet in the West is not honored at all, and is almost unknown, but this does not mean that he is not a saint. Another example of the modern Church: Many New-Martyrs of Greece (1453-1821) who in Greece is known, yet in Russia is completely unknown, but this does not mean that he is not a saint.

Honor Martyrs – Imitate Martyrs

We honor our saints and St. Valentine when we imitate their courage to proclaim their faith in Christ the Savior, who did so even at the cost of their lives. We honor them when we beseech them to appeal to God to have mercy on us and forgive our many sins. We honor them when they are our models of the life in Christ. We do not honor the saints when we measure their ‘worth’ by worldly amusements and festivities in the best circumstances…

So Orthodox Church have the feast day of Saint Valentine on February 14 (+269) as we see in the Orthodox site ORTHODOX ENGLAND:

http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/stdfeb.htm – ORTHODOX ENGLAND

See also:

http://sthermans.ca/saints-life-of-valentine.asp – ST HERMAN OF ALASKA ORTHODOX SOBOR

Price witness – Mimisis witness!

To imitate and to make the Valentine rejoice for us must live Christian lives near the Sacrament of Holy Confession by Orthodox Christian marriage (for those who wishing Marriage).

Here there are Confession hours to lead safely through Confession in the Orthodox Marriage having from God a blessed family!

ENGLAND:

Father Zacharias

St. John the Baptist Monastery Old Rectory,

Tolleshunt Knights by Maldon, Essex CM9 8EZ

United Kingdom

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GERMANY:

Fr. Bill, Orthodox Church of Saints Paul & Peter

Esslingen, Germany

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ARIZONA, USA:

Fr. Ephraim Filotheitis

 http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/index.php

St Anthony’s Monastery in Arizona, USA

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Source:

Encyclopedia New Advent (www.newadvent.org)

Patron Saints Index (www.catholic-forum.com/saints/indexsnt.htm)

Oxford Dictionary of Saints

Hellenism & Orthodoxy, Publications PSL Livani (Greek book)

Saint Valentine of Athens, Publications Good Type (Greek book)

Elder Seraphim of Saint Sabba’s Monastery, Publications Migdonia (Greek book)

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ABEL-TASOS GKIOUZELIS

http://orthodoxsaintvalentine.wordpress.com

ORTHODOX SAINT VALENTINE

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Saint Valentine:

Patron of married and all that unite them love and want to marry

with Orthodox Christian Marriage